Carmel Lady Davis Medical Center

Haifa, Israel

Carmel Lady Davis Medical Center

Haifa, Israel
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Pizov R.,Carmel Lady Davis Medical Center | Eden A.,Carmel Lady Davis Medical Center | Bystritski D.,Carmel Lady Davis Medical Center | Kalina E.,Carmel Lady Davis Medical Center | And 3 more authors.
Anesthesiology | Year: 2010

Background: Respiratory-induced arterial and plethysmographic (pulse oximetry) waveform changes were shown to be good predictors of cardiac output response to increased preload. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability of arterial and plethysmographic waveform variables in patients with mild hypovolemia. Methods: Patients undergoing autologous hemodilution were studied. After anesthesia induction, hemodilution was performed by withdrawing blood in steps of 2% of estimated circulating blood volume (ECBV), up to 20%. The patients who did not develop hypotension (systolic blood pressure < 80 mmHg) were studied. Arterial and plethysmographic waveforms were recorded and analyzed off-line at baseline and after each withdrawal of blood. Variations in arterial systolic and pulse pressure were analyzed using standard methods. Plethysmographic waveform variation and delta pulse oximetry plethysmography were determined by using pulse oximetry recordings. Results: There were 33 study participants. Systolic blood pressure decreased by 11%, and heart rate increased from 73 to 76 beats/min after a 20% reduction of ECBV. Systolic pressure and pulse pressure variations increased (P < 0.005) after a 4% reduction of ECBV. The values of arterial pressure and pulse oximetry waveform variables almost doubled in value after a 20% reduction of ECBV. Systolic pressure variation was the most reliable variable during hypovolemia. Plethysmographic waveform variation increased significantly after a 6% reduction of ECBV and delta pulse oximetry plethysmography after an 8% reduction of ECBV. Conclusions: Arterial and pulse oximetry respiratory-induced changes in waveform variables are reliable indicators of mild hypovolemia in anesthetized patients. The pulse oximetry plethysmographic waveforms accurately reflect arterial waveforms during more progressive hypovolemia. Copyright © 2010, the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.


Pestana D.,Hospital Universitario La Paz | Pestana D.,Hospital Universitario Ramon y Cajal | Espinosa E.,Hospital Universitario Nuestra Senora Of Candelaria | Eden A.,Carmel Lady Davis Medical Center | And 11 more authors.
Anesthesia and Analgesia | Year: 2014

BACKGROUND:: In this study, our objective was to determine whether a perioperative hemodynamic protocol based on noninvasive cardiac output monitoring decreases the incidence of postoperative complications and hospital length of stay in major abdominal surgery patients requiring intensive care unit admission. Secondary objectives were the time to peristalsis recovery and the incidence of wound infection, anastomotic leaks, and mortality. METHODS:: A randomized clinical trial was conducted in 6 tertiary hospitals. One hundred forty-two adult patients scheduled for open colorectal surgery, gastrectomy, or small bowel resection were enrolled. A hemodynamic protocol including fluid administration and vasoactive drugs based on arterial blood pressure, cardiac index, and stroke volume response was compared with standard practice. Patients were followed until hospital discharge (determined by a surgeon blinded to the study) or death. In contrast to previous studies, we designed a pragmatic trial (as opposed to explanatory trials) to mimic real practice and obtain maximal external validity for the study. RESULTS:: Fluid administration was similar except for the number of colloid boluses (2.4 ± 1.8 [treated] vs 1.3 ± 1.4 [control]; P < 0.001) and packed red blood cell units (0.6 ± 1.3 [treated] vs 0.2 ± 0.6 [control]; P = 0.019). Dobutamine was used in 25% (intraoperatively) and 19.4% (postoperatively) of the treated patients versus 1.4% and 0% in the control group (P < 0.001). We have observed a reduction in reoperations in the treated group (5.6% vs 15.7%; P = 0.049). However, no significant differences were observed in overall complications (40% vs 41%; relative risk 0.99 [0.67-1.44]; P = 0.397), length of stay (11.5 [8-15] vs 10.5 [8-16]; P = 0.874), time to first flatus (62 hours [40-76] vs 72 hours [48-96]; P = 0.180), wound infection (7 vs 14; P = 0.085), anastomotic leaks (2 vs 5; P = 0.23), or mortality (4.2% vs 5.7%; P = 0.67). CONCLUSIONS:: The results of our pragmatic study indicate that a perioperative hemodynamic protocol guided by a noninvasive cardiac output monitor was not associated with a decrease in the incidence of overall complications or length of stay in major abdominal surgery. © 2014 International Anesthesia Research Society.


Zur M.,Lin and Carmel Lady Davis Medical Centers | Shai A.,Galilee Medical Center | Shai A.,Bar - Ilan University | Leviov M.,Lin and Carmel Lady Davis Medical Centers | And 6 more authors.
Journal of Surgical Oncology | Year: 2016

Introduction IORT is becoming an accepted radiotherapy technique for treatment of early breast cancer. Data regarding the early complications of breast IORT are lacking. Objectives Assess the nature and risk factors for early complications of breast conserving surgery (BCS) and intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) with INTRABEAM®. Methods IORT with INTRABEAM® was administered to breast cancer patients in Carmel Medical Center as part of an institutional clinical registry project. Three hundred and ninety five patients treated during 2006-2013 were included. Clinical and treatment data and data regarding complications documented within 1 year of surgery were collected. The association between clinical and treatment variables and risk of complications was assessed. Results Complications were documented in 108 (27.3%) of patients. Grade III or IV complications were found in 5% of patients. Infections were diagnosed in 43 (10.8%) patients, seroma in 40 (10.1%), wound dehiscence in 32 (8.1%), and bleeding and hematomas in 11(2.8%). Two patients had a small size skin necrosis. Sixteen patients with a seroma had a secondary complication. All complications resolved. Diabetes mellitus and use of anticoagulants were associated with an increased risk of wound dehiscence and bleeding, respectively. Conclusions IORT for breast cancer is safe in appropriately selected patients. Careful surgical technique and postoperative care is prudent. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


PubMed | Bar - Ilan University, Gynecology Oncology Unit, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology and Carmel Lady Davis Medical Center
Type: | Journal: European journal of obstetrics, gynecology, and reproductive biology | Year: 2016

Diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased risk of recurrence in patients with ovarian cancer. Retrospective studies suggested that the use of statins, metformin and beta blockers is associated with improved prognosis in these patients. Patients with diabetes often suffer from hypertension and are usually treated concomitantly by several classes of drugs. Our aim was to assess the independent contribution of diabetes mellitus and hypertension and of the use of aspirin, statins, metformin and beta blockers on the risk of ovarian cancer recurrence and mortality.Files of ovarian cancer patients treated between 2000 and 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Data regarding disease characteristics, presence of diabetes mellitus and hypertension, recurrence and death were extracted. The use of drugs was assessed using the Clalit Health Services (CHS) pharmacy records.143 patients treated by debulking surgery and platinum based chemotherapy were included. Median age was 62.5, 22 (15.4%) had diabetes mellitus, 61 (42.7%) had chronic hypertension. Statins were used by 43 (30%) patients, 31 (21.7%) used aspirin, 25 (17.5%) used beta blockers and 12 (8.4%) used metformin. In multivariate analysis diabetes mellitus was associated with a shorter recurrence free survival (RFS) and the use of aspirin and metformin was associated with a prolonged RFS in this cohort. Overall survival (OS) was longer in patients using aspirin and shorter in patients with hypertension.Our data suggests that metabolic comorbidities and commonly used drugs are associated with the prognosis of patients with ovarian cancer. Additional trials are needed to confirm these observations and test therapeutic interventions.


Perel A.,Tel Aviv University | Pizov R.,Carmel Lady Davis Medical Center | Cotev S.,Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Intensive Care Medicine | Year: 2014

Optimal fluid management is one of the main challenges in the care of the critically ill. However, the physiological parameters that are commonly monitored and used to guide fluid management are often inadequate and even misleading. From 1987 to 1989 we published four experimental studies which described a method for predicting the response of the cardiac output to fluid administration during mechanical ventilation. The method is based on the analysis of the variations in the arterial pressure in response to a mechanical breath, which serves as a repetitive hemodynamic challenge. Our studies showed that the systolic pressure variation and its components are able to reflect even small changes in the circulating blood volume. Moreover, these dynamic parameters provide information about the slope of the left ventricular function curve, and therefore predict the response to fluid administration better than static preload parameters. Many new dynamic parameters have been introduced since then, including the pulse pressure (PPV) and stroke volume (SVV) variations, and various echocardiographic and other parameters. Though seemingly different, all these parameters are based on measuring the response to a predefined preload-modifying maneuver. The clinical usefulness of these 'dynamic' parameters is limited by many confounding factors, the recognition of which is absolutely necessary for their proper use. With more than 20 years of hindsight we believe that our early studies helped pave the way for the recognition that fluid administration should ideally be preceded by the assessment of ''fluid responsiveness''. The introduction of dynamic parameters into clinical practice can therefore be viewed as a significant step towards a more rational approach to fluid management. © 2014 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg and ESICM.


Pizov R.,Carmel Lady Davis Medical Center | Eden A.,Carmel Lady Davis Medical Center | Bystritski D.,Carmel Lady Davis Medical Center | Kalina E.,Carmel Lady Davis Medical Center | And 2 more authors.
British Journal of Anaesthesia | Year: 2012

BackgroundVariation in arterial pressure and plethysmographic waveforms has been shown to be predictors of cardiac output response to fluid challenge. The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of arterial and plethysmographic waveform variables to predict hypotension during blood loss.MethodsPatients undergoing autologous haemodilution were studied. After anaesthesia induction, blood was withdrawn in steps of 2 of estimated circulating blood volume (ECBV). Arterial and plethysmographic waveforms were recorded and analysed offline at each step of blood withdrawal.ResultsThirty- four (29) out of 118 studied patients tolerated 20 ECBV withdrawal without hypotension. Patients who tolerated 20 ECBV withdrawal were younger than those who did not [mean (sd): 53.8 (11.1) vs 62.7 (10.7); P<0.0001]. Patients with hypertension developed hypotension earlier than healthier patients did. There were no differences at the baseline in arterial and plethysmographic waveform variables between those who did and those who did not tolerate 20 of ECBV withdrawal. All values of variables increased significantly from the baseline after the withdrawal of 4 of ECBV (P<0.005). There were no changes in heart rate (HR), 73 (12) at the baseline and 76 (13) after 20 of ECBV withdrawal (P0.4).ConclusionsArterial and plethysmographic waveform variables were augmented with increasing blood loss in all patients. Older patients, patients who received anti-hypertensive drugs, or both developed hypotension earlier than others. Baseline values were weak predictors of hypotension during stepwise blood withdrawal. No clinically significant increase in HR was observed, regardless of tolerance of arterial pressure to blood withdrawal. © 2012 The Author [2012].


PubMed | Carmel Lady Davis Medical Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Anesthesiology | Year: 2010

Respiratory-induced arterial and plethysmographic (pulse oximetry) waveform changes were shown to be good predictors of cardiac output response to increased preload. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability of arterial and plethysmographic waveform variables in patients with mild hypovolemia.Patients undergoing autologous hemodilution were studied. After anesthesia induction, hemodilution was performed by withdrawing blood in steps of 2% of estimated circulating blood volume (ECBV), up to 20%. The patients who did not develop hypotension (systolic blood pressure < 80 mmHg) were studied. Arterial and plethysmographic waveforms were recorded and analyzed off-line at baseline and after each withdrawal of blood. Variations in arterial systolic and pulse pressure were analyzed using standard methods. Plethysmographic waveform variation and delta pulse oximetry plethysmography were determined by using pulse oximetry recordings.There were 33 study participants. Systolic blood pressure decreased by 11%, and heart rate increased from 73 to 76 beats/min after a 20% reduction of ECBV. Systolic pressure and pulse pressure variations increased (P < 0.005) after a 4% reduction of ECBV. The values of arterial pressure and pulse oximetry waveform variables almost doubled in value after a 20% reduction of ECBV. Systolic pressure variation was the most reliable variable during hypovolemia. Plethysmographic waveform variation increased significantly after a 6% reduction of ECBV and delta pulse oximetry plethysmography after an 8% reduction of ECBV.Arterial and pulse oximetry respiratory-induced changes in waveform variables are reliable indicators of mild hypovolemia in anesthetized patients. The pulse oximetry plethysmographic waveforms accurately reflect arterial waveforms during more progressive hypovolemia.


PubMed | Carmel Lady Davis Medical Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: British journal of anaesthesia | Year: 2012

Variation in arterial pressure and plethysmographic waveforms has been shown to be predictors of cardiac output response to fluid challenge. The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of arterial and plethysmographic waveform variables to predict hypotension during blood loss.Patients undergoing autologous haemodilution were studied. After anaesthesia induction, blood was withdrawn in steps of 2% of estimated circulating blood volume (ECBV). Arterial and plethysmographic waveforms were recorded and analysed offline at each step of blood withdrawal.Thirty-four (29%) out of 118 studied patients tolerated 20% ECBV withdrawal without hypotension. Patients who tolerated 20% ECBV withdrawal were younger than those who did not [mean (sd): 53.8 (11.1) vs 62.7 (10.7); P<0.0001]. Patients with hypertension developed hypotension earlier than healthier patients did. There were no differences at the baseline in arterial and plethysmographic waveform variables between those who did and those who did not tolerate 20% of ECBV withdrawal. All values of variables increased significantly from the baseline after the withdrawal of 4% of ECBV (P<0.005). There were no changes in heart rate (HR), 73 (12) at the baseline and 76 (13) after 20% of ECBV withdrawal (P=0.4).Arterial and plethysmographic waveform variables were augmented with increasing blood loss in all patients. Older patients, patients who received anti-hypertensive drugs, or both developed hypotension earlier than others. Baseline values were weak predictors of hypotension during stepwise blood withdrawal. No clinically significant increase in HR was observed, regardless of tolerance of arterial pressure to blood withdrawal.


PubMed | Carmel Lady Davis Medical Center and University of Pittsburgh
Type: Journal Article | Journal: The American journal of occupational therapy : official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association | Year: 2015

Surgical arthroplasty of thumb carpometacarpal (CMC) joint osteoarthritis is commonly performed. Postoperative therapeutic protocols aim to improve range of motion and function of the revised thumb. We describe a case in which the thumb CMC joint had been chronically dislocated before surgery, with shortening of the soft-tissue dynamic and static stabilizers of the joint. The postoperative protocol addressed the soft tissues using splinting and exercises aimed at lengthening and strengthening these structures, with good results. It may be beneficial to evaluate soft-tissue tension and the pattern of thumb use after surgery for thumb CMC joint osteoarthritis to improve postoperative functional results.

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