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Kampf C.,Uppsala University | Bergman J.,Uppsala University | Oksvold P.,KTH Royal Institute of Technology | Asplund A.,Uppsala University | And 5 more authors.
BMC Medicine | Year: 2012

The complexity of tissue and the alterations that distinguish normal from cancer remain a challenge for translating results from tumor biological studies into clinical medicine. This has generated an unmet need to exploit the findings from studies based on cell lines and model organisms to develop, validate and clinically apply novel diagnostic, prognostic and treatment predictive markers. As one step to meet this challenge, the Human Protein Atlas project has been set up to produce antibodies towards human protein targets corresponding to all human protein coding genes and to map protein expression in normal human tissues, cancer and cells. Here, we present a dictionary based on microscopy images created as an amendment to the Human Protein Atlas. The aim of the dictionary is to facilitate the interpretation and use of the image-based data available in the Human Protein Atlas, but also to serve as a tool for training and understanding tissue histology, pathology and cell biology. The dictionary contains three main parts, normal tissues, cancer tissues and cells, and is based on high-resolution images at different magnifications of full tissue sections stained with H & E. The cell atlas is centered on immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy images, using different color channels to highlight the organelle structure of a cell. Here, we explain how this dictionary can be used as a tool to aid clinicians and scientists in understanding the use of tissue histology and cancer pathology in diagnostics and biomarker studies. © 2012 Kampf et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Fagerberg L.,KTH Royal Institute of Technology | Oksvold P.,KTH Royal Institute of Technology | Skogs M.,KTH Royal Institute of Technology | Algenas C.,Albanova University Center | And 29 more authors.
Journal of Proteome Research | Year: 2013

A gene-centric Human Proteome Project has been proposed to characterize the human protein-coding genes in a chromosome-centered manner to understand human biology and disease. Here, we report on the protein evidence for all genes predicted from the genome sequence based on manual annotation from literature (UniProt), antibody-based profiling in cells, tissues and organs and analysis of the transcript profiles using next generation sequencing in human cell lines of different origins. We estimate that there is good evidence for protein existence for 69% (n = 13985) of the human protein-coding genes, while 23% have only evidence on the RNA level and 7% still lack experimental evidence. Analysis of the expression patterns shows few tissue-specific proteins and approximately half of the genes expressed in all the analyzed cells. The status for each gene with regards to protein evidence is visualized in a chromosome-centric manner as part of a new version of the Human Protein Atlas (www.proteinatlas.org). © 2012 American Chemical Society.


Uhlen M.,KTH Royal Institute of Technology | Uhlen M.,Chalmers University of Technology | Uhlen M.,TU Dortmund | Uhlen M.,Laboratory Surgpath | And 3 more authors.
Science (New York, N.Y.) | Year: 2015

Resolving the molecular details of proteome variation in the different tissues and organs of the human body will greatly increase our knowledge of human biology and disease. Here, we present a map of the human tissue proteome based on an integrated omics approach that involves quantitative transcriptomics at the tissue and organ level, combined with tissue microarray-based immunohistochemistry, to achieve spatial localization of proteins down to the single-cell level. Our tissue-based analysis detected more than 90% of the putative protein-coding genes. We used this approach to explore the human secretome, the membrane proteome, the druggable proteome, the cancer proteome, and the metabolic functions in 32 different tissues and organs. All the data are integrated in an interactive Web-based database that allows exploration of individual proteins, as well as navigation of global expression patterns, in all major tissues and organs in the human body. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.


Sahasrabuddhe N.A.,Institute of Bioinformatics | Barbhuiya M.A.,Jiwaji University | Bhunia S.,Jiwaji University | Subbannayya T.,Institute of Bioinformatics | And 14 more authors.
Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications | Year: 2014

Gallbladder cancer is an uncommon but lethal malignancy with particularly high incidence in Chile, India, Japan and China there is a paucity of unbiased large-scale studies investigating molecular basis of gallbladder cancer. To systematically identify differentially regulated proteins in gallbladder cancer, iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics of gallbladder cancer was carried out using Fourier transform high resolution mass spectrometry. Of the 2575 proteins identified, proteins upregulated in gallbladder cancer included several lysosomal proteins such as prosaposin, cathepsin Z and cathepsin H. Downregulated proteins included serine protease HTRA1 and transgelin, which have been reported to be downregulated in several other cancers. Novel biomarker candidates including prosaposin and transgelin were validated to be upregulated and downregulated, respectively, in gallbladder cancer using tissue microarrays. Our study provides the first large scale proteomic characterization of gallbladder cancer which will serve as a resource for future discovery of biomarkers for gallbladder cancer. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


Fagerberg L.,KTH Royal Institute of Technology | Hallstrom B.M.,KTH Royal Institute of Technology | Oksvold P.,KTH Royal Institute of Technology | Kampf C.,Uppsala University | And 32 more authors.
Molecular and Cellular Proteomics | Year: 2014

Global classification of the human proteins with regards to spatial expression patterns across organs and tissues is important for studies of human biology and disease. Here, we used a quantitative transcriptomics analysis (RNA-Seq) to classify the tissue-specific expression of genes across a representative set of all major human organs and tissues and combined this analysis with antibody- based profiling of the same tissues. To present the data, we launch a new version of the Human Protein Atlas that integrates RNA and protein expression data corresponding to 80% of the human protein-coding genes with access to the primary data for both the RNA and the protein analysis on an individual gene level. We present a classification of all human protein-coding genes with regards to tissue-specificity and spatial expression pattern. The integrative human expression map can be used as a starting point to explore the molecular constituents of the human body. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.


PubMed | University of Edinburgh, Laboratory Surgpath, Atlas Antibodies AB, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and 2 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: BMC cancer | Year: 2017

There is an unmet clinical need for better prognostic and diagnostic tools for renal cell carcinoma (RCC).Human Protein Atlas data resources, including the transcriptomes and proteomes of normal and malignant human tissues, were searched for RCC-specific proteins and cubilin (CUBN) identified as a candidate. Patient tissue representing various cancer types was constructed into a tissue microarray (n=940) and immunohistochemistry used to investigate the specificity of CUBN expression in RCC as compared to other cancers. Two independent RCC cohorts (n=181; n=114) were analyzed to further establish the sensitivity of CUBN as RCC-specific marker and to explore if the fraction of RCCs lacking CUBN expression could predict differences in patient survival.CUBN was identified as highly RCC-specific protein with 58% of all primary RCCs staining positive for CUBN using immunohistochemistry. In venous tumor thrombi and metastatic lesions, the frequency of CUBN expression was increasingly lost. Clear cell RCC (ccRCC) patients with CUBN positive tumors had a significantly better prognosis compared to patients with CUBN negative tumors, independent of T-stage, Fuhrman grade and nodal status (HR 0.382, CI 0.203-0.719, P=0.003).CUBN expression is highly specific to RCC and loss of the protein is significantly and independently associated with poor prognosis. CUBN expression in ccRCC provides a promising positive prognostic indicator for patients with ccRCC. The high specificity of CUBN expression in RCC also suggests a role as a new diagnostic marker in clinical cancer differential diagnostics to confirm or rule out RCC.


PubMed | University of Santiago de Chile, Amrita University, Laboratory Surgpath, Johns Hopkins University and 4 more.
Type: | Journal: BMC cancer | Year: 2015

Poor prognosis in gallbladder cancer is due to late presentation of the disease, lack of reliable biomarkers for early diagnosis and limited targeted therapies. Early diagnostic markers and novel therapeutic targets can significantly improve clinical management of gallbladder cancer.Proteomic analysis of four gallbladder cancer cell lines based on the invasive property (non-invasive to highly invasive) was carried out using the isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation labeling-based quantitative proteomic approach. The expression of macrophage migration inhibitory factor was analysed in gallbladder adenocarcinoma tissues using immunohistochemistry. In vitro cellular assays were carried out in a panel of gallbladder cancer cell lines using MIF inhibitors, ISO-1 and 4-IPP or its specific siRNA.The quantitative proteomic experiment led to the identification of 3,653 proteins, among which 654 were found to be overexpressed and 387 were downregulated in the invasive cell lines (OCUG-1, NOZ and GB-d1) compared to the non-invasive cell line, TGBC24TKB. Among these, macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) was observed to be highly overexpressed in two of the invasive cell lines. MIF is a pleiotropic proinflammatory cytokine that plays a causative role in multiple diseases, including cancer. MIF has been reported to play a central role in tumor cell proliferation and invasion in several cancers. Immunohistochemical labeling of tumor tissue microarrays for MIF expression revealed that it was overexpressed in 21 of 29 gallbladder adenocarcinoma cases. Silencing/inhibition of MIF using siRNA and/or MIF antagonists resulted in a significant decrease in cell viability, colony forming ability and invasive property of the gallbladder cancer cells.Our findings support the role of MIF in tumor aggressiveness and suggest its potential application as a therapeutic target for gallbladder cancer.

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