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Vamvaka E.,University of Lleida | Twyman R.M.,TRM Ltd | Murad A.M.,Laboratory of Synthetic Biology | Melnik S.,University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna | And 8 more authors.
Plant Biotechnology Journal | Year: 2016

Protein microbicides against HIV can help to prevent infection but they are required in large, repetitive doses. This makes current fermenter-based production systems prohibitively expensive. Plants are advantageous as production platforms because they offer a safe, economical and scalable alternative, and cereals such as rice are particularly attractive because they could allow pharmaceutical proteins to be produced economically and on a large scale in developing countries. Pharmaceutical proteins can also be stored as unprocessed seed, circumventing the need for a cold chain. Here, we report the development of transgenic rice plants expressing the HIV-neutralizing antibody 2G12 in the endosperm. Surprisingly for an antibody expressed in plants, the heavy chain was predominantly aglycosylated. Nevertheless, the heavy and light chains assembled into functional antibodies with more potent HIV-neutralizing activity than other plant-derived forms of 2G12 bearing typical high-mannose or plant complex-type glycans. Immunolocalization experiments showed that the assembled antibody accumulated predominantly in protein storage vacuoles but also induced the formation of novel, spherical storage compartments surrounded by ribosomes indicating that they originated from the endoplasmic reticulum. The comparison of wild-type and transgenic plants at the transcriptomic and proteomic levels indicated that endogenous genes related to starch biosynthesis were down-regulated in the endosperm of the transgenic plants, whereas genes encoding prolamin and glutaredoxin-C8 were up-regulated. Our data provide insight into factors that affect the functional efficacy of neutralizing antibodies in plants and the impact of recombinant proteins on endogenous gene expression. © 2016 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.


PubMed | University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, TRM Ltd, St George's, University of London, Laboratory of Synthetic Biology and 2 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Plant biotechnology journal | Year: 2016

Protein microbicides against HIV can help to prevent infection but they are required in large, repetitive doses. This makes current fermenter-based production systems prohibitively expensive. Plants are advantageous as production platforms because they offer a safe, economical and scalable alternative, and cereals such as rice are particularly attractive because they could allow pharmaceutical proteins to be produced economically and on a large scale in developing countries. Pharmaceutical proteins can also be stored as unprocessed seed, circumventing the need for a cold chain. Here, we report the development of transgenic rice plants expressing the HIV-neutralizing antibody 2G12 in the endosperm. Surprisingly for an antibody expressed in plants, the heavy chain was predominantly aglycosylated. Nevertheless, the heavy and light chains assembled into functional antibodies with more potent HIV-neutralizing activity than other plant-derived forms of 2G12 bearing typical high-mannose or plant complex-type glycans. Immunolocalization experiments showed that the assembled antibody accumulated predominantly in protein storage vacuoles but also induced the formation of novel, spherical storage compartments surrounded by ribosomes indicating that they originated from the endoplasmic reticulum. The comparison of wild-type and transgenic plants at the transcriptomic and proteomic levels indicated that endogenous genes related to starch biosynthesis were down-regulated in the endosperm of the transgenic plants, whereas genes encoding prolamin and glutaredoxin-C8 were up-regulated. Our data provide insight into factors that affect the functional efficacy of neutralizing antibodies in plants and the impact of recombinant proteins on endogenous gene expression.


Murad A.M.,Laboratory of Synthetic Biology | Vianna G.R.,Laboratory of Synthetic Biology | Machado A.M.,Laboratory of Synthetic Biology | Da Cunha N.B.,Laboratory of Synthetic Biology | And 4 more authors.
Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry | Year: 2014

Improving the quality and performance of soybean oil as biodiesel depends on the chemical composition of its fatty acids and requires an increase in monounsaturated acids and a reduction in polyunsaturated acids. Despite its current use as a source of biofuel, soybean oil contains an average of 25 % oleic acid and 13 % palmitic acid, which negatively impacts its oxidative stability and freezing point, causing a high rate of nitrogen oxide emission. Gas chromatography and ion mobility mass spectrometry were conducted on soybean fatty acids from metabolically engineered seed extracts to determine the nature of the structural oleic and palmitic acids. The soybean genes FAD2-1 and FatB were placed under the control of the 35SCaMV constitutive promoter, introduced to soybean embryonic axes by particle bombardment and downregulated using RNA interference technology. Results indicate that the metabolically engineered plants exhibited a significant increase in oleic acid (up to 94.58 %) and a reduction in palmitic acid (to <3 %) in their seed oil content. No structural differences were observed between the fatty acids of the transgenic and non-transgenic oil extracts.


PubMed | Laboratory of Synthetic Biology, Embrapa Agroenergy and University of Brasilia
Type: | Journal: Enzyme and microbial technology | Year: 2016

The main goal of the present study was a complete proteomic characterization of total proteins eluted from residual substrate-bound proteins (RSBP), and cellulosomes secreted by Clostridium thermocellum B8 during growth in the presence of microcrystalline cellulose as a carbon source. The second goal was to evaluate their potential use as enzymatic blends for hydrolyzing agro-industrial residues to produce fermentable sugars. Protein identification through LC-MS/MS mass spectrometry showed that the RSBP sample, in addition to cellulosomal proteins, contains a wide variety of proteins, including those without a well-characterized role in plant cell wall degradation. The RSBP subsample defined as purified cellulosomes (PC) consists mainly of glycoside hydrolases grouped in families 5, 8, 9, 10 and 48. Dynamic light scattering, DLS, analysis of PC resulted in two protein peaks (pi1 and pi2) presenting molecular masses in agreement with those previously described for cellulosomes and polycellulosomes. These peaks werent detected after PC treatment with 1.0% Tween. PC and RSBP presented maximal activities at temperatures ranging from 60 to 70C and at pH 5.0. RSBP retained almost all of its activity after incubation at 50, 60 and 70C and PC showed remarkable thermostability at 50 and 60C. RSBP holocellullolytic activities were inhibited by phenolic compounds, while PC showed either increasing activity or a lesser degree of inhibition. RSBP and PC hydrolyze sugar cane straw, cotton waste and microcrystalline cellulose, liberating a diversity of saccharides; however, the highest concentration of released sugar was obtained for assays carried out using PC as an enzymatic blend and after ten days at 50C.

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