Laboratory of Surgical Research

Ribeirão Preto, Brazil

Laboratory of Surgical Research

Ribeirão Preto, Brazil

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Mostefa-Kara M.,University of Paris Descartes | Mostefa-Kara M.,University Paris - Sud | Bonnet D.,University of Paris Descartes | Belli E.,University Paris - Sud | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery | Year: 2015

Objective The study objective was to analyze the anatomy of the ventricular septal defect found in various phenotypes of outflow tract defects. Methods We reviewed 277 heart specimens with isolated outlet ventricular septal defect without subpulmonary stenosis (isolated outlet ventricular septal defect, 19); tetralogy of Fallot (71); tetralogy of Fallot with pulmonary atresia (51); common arterial trunk (54); double outlet right ventricle (65) with subaortic, doubly committed, or subpulmonary ventricular septal defect; and interrupted aortic arch type B (17). Special attention was paid to the rims of the ventricular septal defect viewed from the right ventricular side and the relationships between the tricuspid and aortic valves. Results The ventricular septal defect was always located in the outlet of the right ventricle, between the 2 limbs of the septal band. There was a fibrous continuity between the tricuspid and aortic valves in 74% of specimens with isolated outlet ventricular septal defect, 66% of specimens with tetralogy of Fallot, 39% of specimens with tetralogy of Fallot with pulmonary atresia, 4.6% of specimens with double outlet right ventricle, 1.8% of specimens with common arterial trunk, and zero of specimens with interrupted aortic arch type B (P <.005). When present, this continuity always involved the anterior tricuspid leaflet. Conclusions The ventricular septal defect in outflow tract defects is always an outlet ventricular septal defect, cradled between the 2 limbs of the septal band. However, there are some differences regarding the posteroinferior and superior rims of the ventricular septal defect. These differences suggest an anatomic continuum from the isolated outlet ventricular septal defect to the interrupted aortic arch type B rather than distinct physiologic phenotypes, related to various degrees of abnormal rotation of the outflow tract during heart development: minimal in isolated outlet ventricular septal defect; incomplete in tetralogy of Fallot, tetralogy of Fallot with pulmonary atresia, and double outlet right ventricle; absent in common arterial trunk; and excessive in interrupted aortic arch type B. © 2015 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery.


PubMed | Laboratory of Surgical Research, Paris-Sorbonne University and University Paris - Sud
Type: Comparative Study | Journal: The Journal of thoracic and cardiovascular surgery | Year: 2015

The study objective was to analyze the anatomy of the ventricular septal defect found in various phenotypes of outflow tract defects.We reviewed 277 heart specimens with isolated outlet ventricular septal defect without subpulmonary stenosis (isolated outlet ventricular septal defect, 19); tetralogy of Fallot (71); tetralogy of Fallot with pulmonary atresia (51); common arterial trunk (54); double outlet right ventricle (65) with subaortic, doubly committed, or subpulmonary ventricular septal defect; and interrupted aortic arch type B (17). Special attention was paid to the rims of the ventricular septal defect viewed from the right ventricular side and the relationships between the tricuspid and aortic valves.The ventricular septal defect was always located in the outlet of the right ventricle, between the 2 limbs of the septal band. There was a fibrous continuity between the tricuspid and aortic valves in 74% of specimens with isolated outlet ventricular septal defect, 66% of specimens with tetralogy of Fallot, 39% of specimens with tetralogy of Fallot with pulmonary atresia, 4.6% of specimens with double outlet right ventricle, 1.8% of specimens with common arterial trunk, and zero of specimens with interrupted aortic arch type B (P < .005). When present, this continuity always involved the anterior tricuspid leaflet.The ventricular septal defect in outflow tract defects is always an outlet ventricular septal defect, cradled between the 2 limbs of the septal band. However, there are some differences regarding the posteroinferior and superior rims of the ventricular septal defect. These differences suggest an anatomic continuum from the isolated outlet ventricular septal defect to the interrupted aortic arch type B rather than distinct physiologic phenotypes, related to various degrees of abnormal rotation of the outflow tract during heart development: minimal in isolated outlet ventricular septal defect; incomplete in tetralogy of Fallot, tetralogy of Fallot with pulmonary atresia, and double outlet right ventricle; absent in common arterial trunk; and excessive in interrupted aortic arch type B.


Sader A.A.,Laboratory of Surgical Research | Dantas R.O.,University of Sao Paulo | Campos A.D.,Laboratory of Surgical Research | Evora P.R.B.,Laboratory of Surgical Research
Diseases of the Esophagus | Year: 2016

This report deals with the preparation of a 'true' artificial phrenoesophageal ligament aimed at restoring effective anchoring of the esophagus to the diaphragm, keeping the esophagogastric sphincter in the abdomen. A total of 24 mongrel dogs were assigned to four groups: (i) Group I (n = 4): the esophageal diaphragm hiatus left wide open; (ii) Group II (n = 8): the anterolateral esophagus walls were attached to the diaphragm by the artificial ligament and the esophageal hiatus was left wide opened; (iii) Group III (n = 5): in addition to the use of the artificial ligament, the esophageal hiatus was narrowed with two retroesophageal stitches; (iv) Group IV (n = 7): the only procedure was the esophageal hiatus narrowing with two retroesophageal stitches. The phrenoesophagogastric connections were released, sparing the vagus nerves. Five animals of groups III and IV, which did not develop hiatal hernia, were submitted to esophageal manometry immediately before and 15 days after surgery. In group I, all animals developed huge sliding hiatal hernias. In group II, two dogs (25%) had a paraesophageal hernia between the two parts of the artificial ligament. In group III, neither sliding hiatal hernia nor paraesophageal hernia occurred. In group IV, two animals (28.6%) developed sliding esophageal hiatus hernia. Regarding esophageal manometry, postoperative significant difference between groups III and IV (P = 0.008) was observed. Thus, the artificial phrenoesophageal ligament maintained the esophagus firmly attached to the diaphragm in all animals and the esophagogastric sphincter pressure was significantly higher in this group. © 2016 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.


PubMed | Laboratory of Surgical Research and University of Sao Paulo
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Diseases of the esophagus : official journal of the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus | Year: 2016

This report deals with the preparation of a true artificial phrenoesophageal ligament aimed at restoring effective anchoring of the esophagus to the diaphragm, keeping the esophagogastric sphincter in the abdomen. A total of 24 mongrel dogs were assigned to four groups: (i) Group I (n = 4): the esophageal diaphragm hiatus left wide open; (ii) Group II (n = 8): the anterolateral esophagus walls were attached to the diaphragm by the artificial ligament and the esophageal hiatus was left wide opened; (iii) Group III (n = 5): in addition to the use of the artificial ligament, the esophageal hiatus was narrowed with two retroesophageal stitches; (iv) Group IV (n = 7): the only procedure was the esophageal hiatus narrowing with two retroesophageal stitches. The phrenoesophagogastric connections were released, sparing the vagus nerves. Five animals of groups III and IV, which did not develop hiatal hernia, were submitted to esophageal manometry immediately before and 15 days after surgery. In group I, all animals developed huge sliding hiatal hernias. In group II, two dogs (25%) had a paraesophageal hernia between the two parts of the artificial ligament. In group III, neither sliding hiatal hernia nor paraesophageal hernia occurred. In group IV, two animals (28.6%) developed sliding esophageal hiatus hernia. Regarding esophageal manometry, postoperative significant difference between groups III and IV (P = 0.008) was observed. Thus, the artificial phrenoesophageal ligament maintained the esophagus firmly attached to the diaphragm in all animals and the esophagogastric sphincter pressure was significantly higher in this group.

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