Laboratory of Parasitic and Fungal Molecular Biology

Sfax, Tunisia

Laboratory of Parasitic and Fungal Molecular Biology

Sfax, Tunisia
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Amouri I.,Laboratory of Parasitic and Fungal Molecular Biology | Sellami H.,Laboratory of Parasitic and Fungal Molecular Biology | Abbes S.,Laboratory of Parasitic and Fungal Molecular Biology | Sellami A.,Laboratory of Parasitic and Fungal Molecular Biology | And 4 more authors.
Mycoses | Year: 2011

Vulvovaginal candidosis (VVC) is a common infection of the female genital tract affecting 75% women at least once in their lifetime. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence and potential risk factors associated with VVC and recurrent vulvovaginal candidosis (RVVC). A prospective study of women with vaginitis symptoms was conducted over 2years in the regional clinic of population and family education in Sfax. A discriminant analysis was used to evaluate the association between the incidence of Candida vaginitis and potential risk factors. Sporadic and recurrent VVC were documented respectively in 48% and 6.1%. The most frequent factors associated with positive Candida culture were employed women, uncontrolled diabetes, history of genital infection and intrauterine device contraception. Increased episode numbers of VVC and condom/spermicidal contraception were positively associated with recurrences. Candida albicans was the predominantly isolated species (76.3%) followed by Candida glabrata (19.3%). Infection with C. glabrata occurred in 34% and 17.5% of patients with RVVC and VVC respectively. The discriminant investigation had provided further insights into the basis for prevention and control of RVVC. Increased prevalence of C. glabrata in patients with RVVC and observed risk factors should be taken into consideration to achieve success in the management of this infection. © 2010 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.


Sellami A.,Laboratory of Parasitic and Fungal Molecular Biology | Sellami H.,Laboratory of Parasitic and Fungal Molecular Biology | Neji S.,Laboratory of Parasitic and Fungal Molecular Biology | Makni F.,Laboratory of Parasitic and Fungal Molecular Biology | And 8 more authors.
Mycopathologia | Year: 2011

Invasive candidiasis has emerged as an important nosocomial infection, causing significant morbidity and mortality especially among critically ill patients. The aim of our study was to determine specie distribution and resistance profiles of Candida species isolated from blood cultures. Materials and Methods: We conducted a retrospective study of all episodes of candidemia diagnosed in our laboratory from January 2006 to May 2009. The susceptibility to antifungal agents of all Candida isolates was tested by using a Sensititre® YeastOne panel. Results: A total of 130 Candida isolates were recovered from blood cultures. Candida tropicalis was the most frequent specie (37.7%), followed by C. albicans (22.3%), C. glabrata (19.2%), and C. parapsilosis (12.2%). All the isolates were inhibited by ≤1 μg/ml of amphotericin B and ≤2 μg/ml of caspofungin. For fluconazole, 7.3% of clinical isolates were resistant. It was most active against C. parapsilosis (100% susceptible), C. albicans (95.8% susceptible), and C. tropicalis (94% susceptible). All of the fluconazole-susceptible isolates were susceptible to voriconazole, as were 83.3% of the fluconazole-susceptible-dose-dependent isolates. Among fluconazole-resistant isolates, 85.7% were susceptible to voriconazole. Conclusions: In our institution, C. tropicalis was the most frequent specie isolated from the bloodstream. Caspofungin had an excellent in vitro activity against Candida isolates and was the drug of choice among fluconazole-resistant isolates. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.


PubMed | Laboratory of Parasitic and Fungal Molecular Biology
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Mycoses | Year: 2011

Vulvovaginal candidosis (VVC) is a common infection of the female genital tract affecting 75% women at least once in their lifetime. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence and potential risk factors associated with VVC and recurrent vulvovaginal candidosis (RVVC). A prospective study of women with vaginitis symptoms was conducted over 2 years in the regional clinic of population and family education in Sfax. A discriminant analysis was used to evaluate the association between the incidence of Candida vaginitis and potential risk factors. Sporadic and recurrent VVC were documented respectively in 48% and 6.1%. The most frequent factors associated with positive Candida culture were employed women, uncontrolled diabetes, history of genital infection and intrauterine device contraception. Increased episode numbers of VVC and condom/spermicidal contraception were positively associated with recurrences. Candida albicans was the predominantly isolated species (76.3%) followed by Candida glabrata (19.3%). Infection with C. glabrata occurred in 34% and 17.5% of patients with RVVC and VVC respectively. The discriminant investigation had provided further insights into the basis for prevention and control of RVVC. Increased prevalence of C. glabrata in patients with RVVC and observed risk factors should be taken into consideration to achieve success in the management of this infection.


PubMed | Laboratory of Parasitic and Fungal Molecular Biology
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Mycopathologia | Year: 2011

Invasive candidiasis has emerged as an important nosocomial infection, causing significant morbidity and mortality especially among critically ill patients. The aim of our study was to determine specie distribution and resistance profiles of Candida species isolated from blood cultures.We conducted a retrospective study of all episodes of candidemia diagnosed in our laboratory from January 2006 to May 2009. The susceptibility to antifungal agents of all Candida isolates was tested by using a Sensititre() YeastOne panel.A total of 130 Candida isolates were recovered from blood cultures. Candida tropicalis was the most frequent specie (37.7%), followed by C. albicans (22.3%), C. glabrata (19.2%), and C. parapsilosis (12.2%). All the isolates were inhibited by 1 g/ml of amphotericin B and 2 g/ml of caspofungin. For fluconazole, 7.3% of clinical isolates were resistant. It was most active against C. parapsilosis (100% susceptible), C. albicans (95.8% susceptible), and C. tropicalis (94% susceptible). All of the fluconazole-susceptible isolates were susceptible to voriconazole, as were 83.3% of the fluconazole-susceptible-dose-dependent isolates. Among fluconazole-resistant isolates, 85.7% were susceptible to voriconazole.In our institution, C. tropicalis was the most frequent specie isolated from the bloodstream. Caspofungin had an excellent in vitro activity against Candida isolates and was the drug of choice among fluconazole-resistant isolates.

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