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Laboratory of, Hong Kong

Li M.,Laboratory of Innovative Medicine | Ng S.C.,Laboratory of Innovative Medicine
Current Pharmaceutical Design | Year: 2014

This article reviews the current progresses in application of both exogenous and endogenous progenitor cells/stem cells for cardiac repair, and the current understanding of the naturally-occurring process for physiological myocyte turnover and possibly cardiac repair. In particular the development of methods for potentiating the naturally-occurring mechanism for substantial repair of pathologically damaged cardiac tissues is discussed. In the last decade, tremendous efforts to identify both exogenous and endogenous progenitor cells/stem cells possessing capacities of differentiating into cardiac lineages have been made for potential cardiac repair. Although many impressive progresses have been made in the application of differently sourced progenitor cells/stem cells, such as embryonic stem cells (ESCs), induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS), bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), skeletal myoblasts (SMs), umbilical cord blood cells (UCBs), residential cardiac stem cells (CSCs), cardiac resident fibroblasts (CRFs), or adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs) for repair of damaged heart, however, inevitable controversies exist concerning: (i) the immune compatibility of the exogenous donor progenitors/stem cells, (ii) the tumorigenicity with ESCs and iPS, and (iii) the efficiency of these exogenous or endogenous progenitors/stem cells to acquire cardiac lineages to reconstitute the lost cardiac tissues. The recent recognition of some active small molecules that can induce myocardial regeneration to repair damaged heart tissues through enhancing the naturally-occurring cardiac-repair mechanism has offered the hope for clinical translation of the technology. Potentiating the naturally-occurring process for cardiac repair by administration of such small molecules has provided a promising strategy for reconstruction of damaged cardiac tissues after heart infarction. Therefore, this article is in favor of the notion that such small molecules with the activity of manipulating gene expressions in such a way of inducing endogenous stem cells to commit cardiac lineage differentiation and consequently myocardial regeneration may fulfill the dream of substantial repair of damaged heart. © 2014 Bentham Science Publishers. Source


Feng Z.,Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine | Li Z.,CAS Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics | Li S.,St. Francis College | Tang M.,Laboratory of Innovative Medicine | And 9 more authors.
Journal of Clinical and Experimental Cardiology | Year: 2014

Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) is the single largest killer out of all diseases in Europe and in the US. Pathologic cardiac ischemia in CHD triggers a succession of events leading to massive destruction and loss of cardiac tissues. Thus, replacement of the damaged cardiac tissues by newly regenerated myocardium would be a therapeutic ideal for pathology modifying treatment of CHD. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of an active fraction isolated from Chinese herb Rosa laevigata Michx (aFRLM) in therapeutic cardiomyogenesis through promoting substantial regeneration of cardiac tissues in a Myocardial Infarction (MI) animal model. Our results demonstrated that oral administration of aFRLM to MI animals could significantly improve cardiac functional performance and induce myocardial regeneration replacing the necrosed cardiac tissues in a sub-clinical MI animal model. The property of the aFRLM appears to be entirely novel and may provide a potential therapeutic alternative for MI treatment. © 2014 Feng Z, et al. Source


Qu H.,Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine | Feng Z.,Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine | Li Z.,CAS Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics | Li C.,Queen Mary, University of London | And 6 more authors.
BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine | Year: 2015

Background: The replacement of lost cardiac tissues by regenerated myocardium would be a therapeutic ideal for myocardial infarction. The objective of this study was therefore to evaluate the ability of an active fraction that was isolated from Rosa laevigata Michx in therapeutic cardiomyogenesis in a myocardial infarction rat model. Methods: The myocardial infarction animal model was induced by the permanent ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery in rats. The active fraction, which improves the survival rate and prevents ischemic reperfusion damage, was used to test the therapeutic effect of this fraction on myocardial infarction. Results: The oral administration of the active fraction for 4weeks could progressively restore the decreased cardiac function due to myocardial infarction. The significantly improved cardiac function was probably attributed to the active fraction-induced myocardial regeneration, which replaced the lost cardiac tissues in the myocardial infarction animals. Conclusions: The property of this active fraction appears to be entirely novel and may provide a potential therapeutic alternative for myocardial infarction. © 2015 Qu et al. Source

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