Laboratory of Medical Microbiology

Belgium

Laboratory of Medical Microbiology

Belgium

Time filter

Source Type

Duterme S.,Laboratory of Medical Microbiology | Vanhoof R.,Laboratory of Medical Microbiology | Vanderpas J.,Laboratory of Medical Microbiology | Pierard D.,University Hospital | Huygen K.,Scientific Institute of Public Health WIV ISP
Acta Clinica Belgica: International Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Medicine | Year: 2016

Objective: Report on the pitfalls of serodiagnosis of pertussis in Belgium for 2013 by the NRC Bordetella. Methods: Determine cases of acute infection using an anti-pertussis toxin (PT) IgG antibody ELISA. Results: A total of 2471 serum samples were received. Clinical information on the duration of cough (at moment of blood sampling) is essential for a reliable interpretation of the results. In order to avoid false negative results, 213 samples for which this information was lacking were not tested. For a total of 2179 patients tested, 520 (23.9%) had antibody levels indicative of an acute infection, 261 (12%) samples were diagnosed as positive (indicative of a pertussis infection or vaccination during the last year), 143 (6.7%) samples were classified as doubtful and 752 (34,5%) (35.5%) were diagnosed as negative. The serodiagnosis of pertussis has limited value for the early diagnosis of the disease and PCR analysis on nasopharyngeal swabs is the method of choice during the first 2 weeks and always for young children <1 year old. For sera collected during the first 2 weeks with anti-PT levels below the threshold for acute infection, a second sample collected 2–3 weeks later is needed a definitive diagnosis. For 503 (23.0%) early samples, a second serum sample was requested but not provided. For 85 patients, for whom a second sample was received, 12.9% were eventually diagnosed as having an acute infection. Conclusion: In order to generate reliable serodiagnostic results for pertussis, serum samples should preferentially be collected 3 weeks after onset of symptoms. © Acta Clinica Belgica 2016.


van der Donk C.F.M.,Maastricht University | van de Bovenkamp J.H.B.,Laboratory of Medical Microbiology | de Brauwer E.I.G.B.,Atrium Medical | de Mol P.,University of Liège | And 6 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2012

We determined the prevalence and spread of antibiotic resistance and the characteristics of ESBL producing and/or multi drug resistant (MDR) Escherichia coli isolates collected from urine samples from urology services in the Euregio Meuse-Rhine, the border region of the Netherlands (n = 176), Belgium (n = 126) and Germay (n = 119). Significant differences in resistance between the three regions were observed. Amoxicillin-clavulanic acid resistance ranged from 24% in the Netherlands to 39% in Belgium (p = 0.018), from 20% to 40% (p<0.004) for the fluoroquinolones and from 20% to 40% (p = 0.018) for the folate antagonists. Resistance to nitrofurantoin was less than 5%. The prevalence of ESBL producing isolates varied from 2% among the Dutch isolates to 8% among the German ones (p = 0.012) and were mainly CTX-M 15. The prevalence of MDR isolates among the Dutch, German and Belgian isolates was 11%, 17% and 27%, respectively (p< = 0.001 for the Belgian compared with the Dutch isolates). The majority of the MDR and ESBL producing isolates belonged to ST131. This study indicates that most antibiotics used as first choice oral empiric treatment for UTIs (amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, fluoroquinolones and folate antagonists) are not appropriate for this purpose and that MDR strains such as CTX-M producing ST131 have spread in the entire Euregion. Our data stress the importance of ward specific surveillance to optimize empiric treatment. Also, prudent use of antibiotics and further research to alternative agents are warranted. © 2012 van der Donk et al.


Van Der Donk C.,Maastricht University | Van De Bovenkamp J.,Laboratory of Medical Microbiology | Bamelis H.,Limburgs Gezondheids Overleg | Driessen C.,Maastricht University | And 4 more authors.
Future Microbiology | Year: 2013

Aim: To investigate the prevalence and genetic background of Escherichia coli collected from different patient populations in the Euroregion Meuse-Rhine. Materials & methods: Susceptibility testing was performed on 1651 E. coli isolates with broth microdilution. Their genetic background was determined using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing. Results: The prevalence of resistance varied significantly between the populations. Approximately 10% of the E. coli isolates were multidrug-resistant and/or a β-lactamase producer. The most prevalent extended-spectrum β-lactamase type was CTX-M-15 and ST131 was the most prevalent multilocus sequence typing type. Results from pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of the ST131 isolates indicate the spread of these isolates in the Euroregion. Conclusion: E. coli ST131 was the most prevalent sequence type in our Euroregional study. It is essential to control the spread of these resistant strains (e.g., with infection-control policies, antibiotic stewardship programs and antibiotic resistance surveillance). In this way we could observe shifts in the prevalence of resistance of the E. coli population and act accordingly. © 2013 Future Medicine Ltd.


Dalla Gasperina D.,University of Insubria | Tozzi M.,University of Insubria | Astuti N.,University of Insubria | Balsamo M.L.,University of Insubria | And 4 more authors.
Transplantation Proceedings | Year: 2011

Tuberculosis (TB) is a serious infection in immunocompromised patients, such as solid organ transplant recipients and HIV-infected patients. The diagnosis and treatment in this population present several challenges because of the aspecific clinical manifestations, the difficulty in diagnosis, and the choice of the most appropriate therapeutic regimen. Therapeutic challenges arise from drug-related toxicities, interactions between immunosuppressive, antiretroviral, and antituberculous drugs. We present a case of primary TB infection that occurred 3 years after transplantation in a HIV-and hepatitis C virus-coinfected kidney-pancreas recipient. The infection was successfully treated with no hepatotoxicity or rejection with a non-rifampin-containing regimen. © 2011 by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


Nenoff P.,Laboratory of Medical Microbiology | Grunewald S.,University of Leipzig | Paasch U.,University of Leipzig
JDDG - Journal of the German Society of Dermatology | Year: 2014

Since 2010 the FDA has approved laser systems as capable of producing a "temporary increase in clear nails" in patients with onychomycosis. Fungal eradication is probably mediated by heat in infrared laser systems; their efficacy has been confirmed thermographically, histologically and in electron microscopy. Another approach to decontaminate the nail organ is to disrupt fungi and spores by q-switched pulse applications. Recently specific combinations of wavelengths have been tested for their ability to disrupt the mitochondrial transmembrane potential at physiological temperatures by generating ATP and ROS. While clinically extremely high clearance rates of approximately 87.5-95.8 % have been reported, in-vitro investigations have failed to confirm the clearance. The variety of systems and advised parameters hampers a systematic evaluation. Recommendations for safe and practical treatment protocols, informed consent items, and combination with conventional treatment options are all areas of active work. Currently there is a lack of data concerning the long-term efficacy of laser therapy of onychomycosis; certified treatment protocols are needed. © 2014 Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft (DDG). Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.


Nijhuis R.H.T.,Laboratory for Medical Microbiology and Immunology | Severs T.T.,University Utrecht | van der Vegt D.S.J.M.,Laboratory for Medical Microbiology and Immunology | van der Vegt D.S.J.M.,Laboratory of Medical Microbiology | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy | Year: 2015

Objectives: Mycoplasma genitalium is a sexually transmitted pathogen, and infection with it is usually treated with macrolides. Unfortunately, emerging resistance to the macrolides has been associated with mutations in region V of the 23S rRNA gene. The aim of this retrospective study was to describe the incidence of macrolide resistance-associated mutations in M. genitalium from patients in the Netherlands. Methods: All urogenital samples obtained from patients visiting a general practitioner or hospital in the east of the Netherlands that tested positive using the routine M. genitalium real-time PCR (February 2012-November 2014) were included. Following a PCR targeting the 23S rRNA gene, sequencing of the PCR fragments was performed to identify possible macrolide resistance-associated mutations. Results: Forty-eight of the 153 samples (31.4%) included in this study contained a mutation in the 23S rRNA gene. This was reduced to 44/146 (30.1%) if only samples from unique patients were included. The predominant mutations identified were A2058G (16/44; 36.3%), A2059G (14/44; 31.8%) and a unique high proportion of A2058T (12/44; 27.3%). Treatment failure was observed in four patients initially infected with M. genitalium containing macrolide resistance-associated mutations, while in one of these patients subsequent treatment with moxifloxacin resulted in a microbiological cure. Conclusions: This study shows that macrolide resistance-associated mutations in M. genitalium occur with a high frequency. In contrast to studies from other regions, Dutch M. genitalium isolates carry the A2058T mutation at high frequency. Our data confirm the need for prospective detection of macrolide resistance-associated mutations prior to treating patients. © The Author 2015.


Maurissen I.,GZA St. Augustinus | Jeurissen A.,Laboratory of Medical Microbiology | Strauven T.,GZA St. Augustinus | Sprengers D.,GZA St. Augustinus | De Schepper B.,GZA St. Augustinus
Infection | Year: 2012

A 51-year-old previously healthy woman presented with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and elevated liver enzymes. Further diagnostic investigations showed the presence of an acute hepatitis E infection associated with anti-ganglioside GM1 antibodies. After treatment with intravenous immunoglobulins, the patient made a rapid recovery. Here, we report the first case of GBS due to acute hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection associated with the presence of anti-ganglioside GM1 antibodies. We also review available literature on the association between acute HEV infection and GBS. © Springer-Verlag 2011.


Tilburg J.J.H.C.,Canisius Wilhelmina Hospital | Rossen J.W.A.,St Elisabeth Hospital | Van Hannen E.J.,St Antonius Hospital | Melchers W.J.G.,Radboud University Nijmegen | And 8 more authors.
Journal of Clinical Microbiology | Year: 2012

The genotypic diversity of Coxiella burnetii in clinical samples obtained from the Dutch Q fever outbreak episodes of 2007-2010 was determined by using a 6-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis panel. The results are consistent with the introduction of one founder genotype that is gradually diversifying over time while spreading throughout The Netherlands. Copyright © 2012, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.


PubMed | Laboratory of Medical Microbiology
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Euro surveillance : bulletin Europeen sur les maladies transmissibles = European communicable disease bulletin | Year: 2016

We identified a novel plasmid-mediated colistin-resistance gene in porcine and bovine colistin-resistant Escherichia coli that did not contain mcr-1. The gene, termed mcr-2, a 1,617 bp phosphoethanolamine transferase harboured on an IncX4 plasmid, has 76.7% nucleotide identity to mcr-1. Prevalence of mcr-2 in porcine colistin-resistant E. coli (11/53) in Belgium was higher than that of mcr-1 (7/53). These data call for an immediate introduction of mcr-2 screening in ongoing molecular epidemiological surveillance of colistin-resistant Gram-negative pathogens.


PubMed | Laboratory of Medical Microbiology
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal der Deutschen Dermatologischen Gesellschaft = Journal of the German Society of Dermatology : JDDG | Year: 2014

Since 2010 the FDA has approved laser systems as capable of producing a temporary increase in clear nails in patients with onychomycosis. Fungal eradication is probably mediated by heat in infrared laser systems; their efficacy has been confirmed thermographically, histologically and in electron microscopy. Another approach to decontaminate the nail organ is to disrupt fungi and spores by q-switched pulse applications. Recently specific combinations of wavelengths have been tested for their ability to disrupt the mitochondrial transmembrane potential at physiological temperatures by generating ATP and ROS. While clinically extremely high clearance rates of approximately 87.5-95.8 % have been reported, in-vitro investigations have failed to confirm the clearance. The variety of systems and advised parameters hampers a systematic evaluation. Recommendations for safe and practical treatment protocols, informed consent items, and combination with conventional treatment options are all areas of active work. Currently there is a lack of data concerning the long-term efficacy of laser therapy of onychomycosis; certified treatment protocols are needed.

Loading Laboratory of Medical Microbiology collaborators
Loading Laboratory of Medical Microbiology collaborators