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Gorskaya Yu.F.,Laboratory of Immunity Regulation | Danilova T.A.,Laboratory of Immunity Regulation | Mezentseva M.V.,Laboratory of Microbiology of Latent Infections | Shapoval I.M.,Laboratory of Microbiology of Latent Infections | And 8 more authors.
Bulletin of Experimental Biology and Medicine

We studied the effect of BMP-2 added to the culture medium on osteogenic and proliferative properties of multipotent stromal cells (MSC) and on the expression of cytokine genes induced by immunization of experimental animals with bacterial antigens. It is shown that the presence of BMP-2 in the culture medium stimulates proliferation of bone marrow MSC and especially spleen MSC (which was seen from enlargement of MSC colonies); improves the efficiency of MSC cloning; increases osteogenic activity of mouse bone marrow MSC; induces osteogenic differentiation of splenic MSC (osteogenesis is normally not observed in the spleen); reduces the number of macrophages in cultures; inhibits synthesis of mRNA for proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α) that typically occurs in cultures of the bone marrow and spleen from animals immunized with S. typhimurium or group A streptococcus antigens. Bearing in mind that proinflammatory cytokines negatively affect osteogenic activity of the bone marrow, we can hypothesize that BMP-2 not only stimulates osteogenesis, but also provides optimal conditions for its realization by suppressing the expression of genes encoding these cytokines. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York. Source

Gorskaya Y.F.,Laboratory of Immunity Regulation | Danilova T.A.,Laboratory of Immunity Regulation | Lebedinskaya O.V.,Perm State Medical Academy | Lunin V.G.,Gamaleya Institute of Epidemiology and Microbiology | And 3 more authors.
Bulletin of Experimental Biology and Medicine

Immunization of CBA mice with killed group A streptococcus (type 5) vaccine changed the counts of stromal precursor cells (CFC-F) in bone marrow transplants at different donorrecipient combinations (normal, N, or immune, I). CFC-F counts in bone marrow transplants from normal mice transplanted to immunized animals decreased 4-6-fold depending on the transplant age in comparison with similar transplants in normal recipients. The percentage of CFC-F colonies with alkaline phosphatase (osteogenesis marker) activity decreased more than 2-fold. Similarly, the count of CFC-F in the transplants was 2-fold lower during delayed (7 months) period after bone marrow transplantation from immunized donors (8-12 days after the end of immunization) to intact recipients, while 2 months after transplantation it was 3-fold lower. The mean optical density of the bone capsule in preparations stained for glycogen and alkaline phosphatase was 1.5-3 times lower in the N→I and I→N experiments in comparison with the control (N→N). On the other hand, CFC-F count in the femoral bone marrow of immunized animals was significantly (3.5-2.5 times) higher during the period from 8 days to 8 months after the end of immunization compared to CFC-F count in the femoral bone marrow of intact mice. These results attest to a significant prolonged effect of streptococcal antigens on the bone marrow stromal tissue. These data also indicate that not all CFC-F, the counts of which increased in response to antigens, are responsible for transplantability of the stromal tissue in heterotopic transplantation. Immunization by streptococcal antigens seemed to suppress transplantability and osteogenic activity of stromal stem cells. The efficiency of CFC-F cloning in mouse bone marrow cultures increased significantly (2-3-fold) in the presence of sera from immune mice. The levels of TNF-α and IFN-γ were low in this serum (2.7 and 6 times lower, respectively) in comparison with normal serum. Presumably, the effects of streptococcal antigens on stromal tissue were mediated through serum cytokines. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. Source

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