Laboratory of Human Genetic

Laboratory of, Italy

Laboratory of Human Genetic

Laboratory of, Italy
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Stahr K.,University of Duisburg - Essen | Kuechler A.,University of Duisburg - Essen | Gencik M.,Laboratory of Human Genetic | Arnolds J.,University of Duisburg - Essen | And 3 more authors.
Annals of Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology | Year: 2017

Objectives: Whether the origin of severe hearing loss in Refsum's syndrome is caused by cochlear impairment or retrocochlear degeneration remains unclear. This case report aims to investigate hearing performance before and after cochlear implantation to shed light on this question. Also, identification of new mutations causing Refsum's syndrome would be helpful in generating additional means of diagnosis. Methods: A family of 4 individuals was subjected to genetic testing. Two siblings (56 and 61 years old) suffered from severe hearing and vision loss and received bilateral cochlear implants. Genetic analysis, audiological outcome, and clinical examinations were performed. Results: One new mutation in the PHYH gene (c.768del63bp) causing Refsum's disease was found. Preoperative distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPAOEs) were absent. Postoperative speech perception in Freiburger speech test was 100% for bisyllabic words and 85% (patient No. 1) and 65% (patient No. 2), respectively, for monosyllabic words. Five years after implantation, speech perception remained stable for bisyllabic words but showed decreasing capabilities for monosyllabic words. Discussion: A new mutation causing Refsum's disease is presented. Cochlear implantation in case of severe hearing loss leads to an improvement in speech perception and should be recommended for patients with Refsum's disease, especially when the hearing loss is combined with a severe loss of vision. Decrease of speech perception in the long-term follow-up could indicate an additional retrocochlear degeneration. © SAGE Publications.


Romeo A.,Fatebenefratelli e Oftalmico Hospital | Lodi M.,Fatebenefratelli e Oftalmico Hospital | Viri M.,Fatebenefratelli e Oftalmico Hospital | Parente E.,Fatebenefratelli e Oftalmico Hospital | And 4 more authors.
Pediatric Neurology | Year: 2014

Background Hypochondroplasia is a rare skeletal dysplasia characterized by disproportionately short stature, lumbar lordosis, and limited extension of the elbow caused by mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) gene that plays a role in controlling nervous system development. Hypochondroplasia with FGFR3 mutation associated with bilateral medial temporal lobe anomalies and focal epilepsy was previously reported in several patients. Patient We report clinical, electroclinical, and neuroradiological findings of one patient affected by hypochondroplasia. Results Clinical diagnosis was confirmed by molecular analysis of the FGFR3 gene, which showed a N540 K mutation. The patient had normal psychomotor development and showed early-onset focal seizures with left temporal localization on interictal and ictal electroencephalograph. The seizures were well controlled, and the patient has been seizure-free since infancy. Magnetic resonance imaging showed abnormal anteriorly posteriorly infolding in the hippocampus and abnormally oriented parahippocampus sulci, and additional cortical rim dysplasia with gray-white matter junction blurring in the hippocampus. Conclusions The present case of hypochondroplasia and FGFR3 mutation in Asn540Lys associated with characteristic abnormalities involving bilaterally medial temporal lobe structures, probable hippocampal cortex focal dysplasia, and early onset of focal epilepsy underscores the possibility of a rare syndrome. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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