Laboratory of Forest Resources Management

Sasaguri, Japan

Laboratory of Forest Resources Management

Sasaguri, Japan

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Back C.-G.,Laboratory of Forest Resources Management | Back C.-G.,Kyungpook National University | Lee S.-Y.,Laboratory of Forest Resources Management | Lee S.-Y.,Kyungpook National University | And 7 more authors.
Journal of the Faculty of Agriculture, Kyushu University | Year: 2015

Symptoms similar to the cobweb disease were observed on beech mushrooms (Hypsizygus marmoreus') growing in Cheongdo-gun, Gyeongbuk Province, Korea, in May 2013. The causal agent was collected and cultured on potato dextrose agar media at different temperatures (5-30°C). The growth of the isolated fungus, characterized by the production of numerous sclerotia and red pigments, was temperature dependent, with minimum growth at 5°C and maximum growth at 25°C. A pathogenicity test revealed that the isolated fungus causes cobweb disease in the host mushroom H. marmoreus (white) as well as in three other mushrooms-H. marmoreus (brown), Flammulina velutipes, and Pleurotus eryngii-with massive mycelia and few conidia. Phylogenetic analysis of four genes (ITS, RPB1, RPB2, and TEF) showed that this isolate has a unique lineage and is distantly related to other species of Cladobotryum that cause the cobweb disease. The results showed that the isolated fungus is a new species, herein named Cladobotryum hypsigum, which causes cobweb disease in H. marmoreus in Korea.


Lee K.-H.,Laboratory of Forest Resources Management | Lee K.-H.,Chonnam National University | Luong T.-H.,Laboratory of Forest Resources Management | Luong T.-H.,Chonnam National University | And 7 more authors.
Journal of the Faculty of Agriculture, Kyushu University | Year: 2015

Annual tree rings may have information to help investigate the effects of environmental change caused by temperature, air pollution, and acid rain on tree growth. Annual tree ring growth in relation to environmental changes was studied by analysing the chemistry of tree rings of Larix leptolepis (L. leptolepis) and Cryptomeria japonica (C. japonica) in southern Korea. Tree ring growth (diameter, annual increments of ring area) and tree ring chemistry (δ13C, δ; 15N, N) concentration, and Ca/Al ratios of both species were analysed. Regression analysis was conducted between tree ring data and environmental variables. Annual tree ring growth significantly differed between the two species and increased over time (p<0.01). The growth rate of L. leptolepis (ring width and ring area) was lower than that of C. japonica. Temperature, CO2, NO2, and SO2 affected (p<0.05) the tree ring area increment of C. japonica, and SO, affected (p<0.05) the tree ring area increment of L. leptolepis. The relationships of temperature, SO2, and NO2 concentrations with tree ring δ 13C of both species (p<0.05) increased C isotope discrimination (Δ) and affected tree ring growth. There was a negative correlation between annual ring area and A in tree rings of L. leptolepis (p<0.01). For C. japonica, Δ was positively correlated (p<0.01) with annual ring area. The correlation of precipitation pH with tree ring δ 13C, δ 15N, and N concentration of the two species (p<0.01) could provide information on N deposition due to the H+ input from acid rain. Tree ring δ 15N and N concentration may be useful as indicators for precipitation pH. Tree ring growth was influenced by climate change, atmosphere pollutants and precipitation pH. The effects of increased temperature, atmosphere pollutants, and acid precipitation on radial growth may reflect N deposition from fossil fuel combustion. Acid deposition at the study site affected tree ring growth and both species may be at risk from the long-term effects of acid deposition over time.


Park G.-S.,Laboratory of Forest Resources Management | Park G.-S.,Chungnam National University | Rang G.-N.,Laboratory of Forest Resources Management | Rang G.-N.,Korea forest Research Institute | And 9 more authors.
Journal of the Faculty of Agriculture, Kyushu University | Year: 2010

This study was carried out to estimate annual carbon production by fine root in Pinus densiflora, Pinus koraiensis, Larix leptolepis and Quercus acutissima stands of Gongju region, Korea. Soil samples were taken at 0-30 cm, 30-60 cm, and 60-90 cm soil depths from April to November (monthly increment method) in 2007 using soil sampler. Fine root carbon biomass was higher at 0-30 cm soil depth than in the other soil depths. Total fine root carbon biomass at 0-90 cm soil depth was highest in Larix leptolespis stand among the four study stands. Net fine root carbon production (kg ha -1 yr -1) in Pinus densiflora, Pinus koraiensis, Larix leptolepis and Quercus acutissima stands were 889 kg, 2,266 kg, 851 kg, and 1,121 kg at 0-30 cm soil depth, respectively. Total net fine root carbon production (kg ha -1 yr -1) was highest in Pinus koraiensis stand among the four study stands. Fine root turnover rates in the four stands were ranged from 0.59 to 2.63 at 0-30 cm, 30-60 cm, and 60-90 cm soil depth.


Lee S.-Y.,Laboratory of Forest Resources Management | Lee S.-Y.,Kangwon National University | Chae H.-M.,Laboratory of Forest Resources Management | Chae H.-M.,Korea Climate Change Countermeasure Research Center | And 3 more authors.
Journal of the Faculty of Agriculture, Kyushu University | Year: 2010

We investigated Japanese red pine (Pinus densiflora Siebold et Zuccarini) mortality that resulted from a 17,097 ha forest fire that occurred in eastern Korea in April of 2000. We developed a logistic regression model that relates the probability of tree mortality to diameter at breast height (DBH) and height of stem blackening (HSB) and found the probability of tree mortality increased as the HSB increased and DBH decreased. We compare those results with stem mortality models developed for Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) in Sweden and Eastern white pine (Pinus strobes, L.) in Canada and discuss the need for methodologies that can be used to develop comparable models.


Jun K.-W.,Laboratory of Forest Resources Management | Jun K.-W.,Korea University | Oh C.-Y.,Laboratory of Forest Resources Management | Oh C.-Y.,Korea University | And 5 more authors.
Journal of the Faculty of Agriculture, Kyushu University | Year: 2015

Extreme climate phenomena are occurring around the world caused by global climate change, and Korea is no exception. Heavy rains continue to occur in Korea, which exceed the previous highest rainfall records. In particular, as flash floods generate heavy rainfall on the mountains over a relatively a short period of time, the likelihood of landslides increases. Therefore, it is necessary to scientifically analyze landslide risk areas to minimize damage in the event of a landslide, and to collect and analyze a variety of spatial information. This study constructs a spatial information database using GIS and integrating geography, hydrology, geology, and forestry, which is required for a complete analysis of landslide risk areas. We also carried out a case study of Injegun, Gangwondo, which suffered from serious landslides and flash floods in 2006 after Typhoon Ewiniar, by overlaying site monitoring data with airborne images. Furthermore, this study evaluates slope stability of the affected areas using SINMAP (Stability Index Mapping), analyzes spatial data that have high correlation with selected landslide areas using Likelihood Ratio, and prepares landslide prediction of the mountainous areas that are vulnerable to disasters.


Cha J.Y.,Laboratory of Forest Resources Management | Cha J.Y.,Hokkaido University | Wirawan I.G.P.,Laboratory of Forest Resources Management | Wirawan I.G.P.,Udayana University | And 7 more authors.
Journal of the Faculty of Agriculture, Kyushu University | Year: 2010

In this study, we analyzed fungus gardens of Odontotermes feae (Wasmann), which are associated with Termitomyces eurhizus (Berk.) R. Heim, and of Ancistrotermes pakistanicus Ahmad, which are associated with T. striatus (Beeli) R. Heim, to examine the ecological effects of termite use on primordium and fruiting-body formation Our results indicate that the symbiotic termites strictly managed those fungus gardens that developed fruiting bodies We also found that the termites prevented fruiting-body formation in fungus gardens of O. feae associated with T. eurhizus by eating the blackish tips of the primordia just prior to fruiting-body development Ancistrotermes pakistanicus, however, did not eat the growing primordia of T. striatus. Instead, the primordia became fruiting bodies, the pseudorhizae of which were used along with the fungus garden as food for the termites Moreover, our results revealed that Termitomyces developed fruiting bodies in the fungus gardens after the termites had deserted the nest. In conclusion, although the behavior between O. feae and A pakistanicus toward fungus combs differs, their common goal is to maintain mycelial masses, including woody debris as a food resource.


Cha J.Y.,Laboratory of Forest Resources Management | Cha J.Y.,Hokkaido University | Fukui T.,Laboratory of Forest Resources Management | Fukui T.,Hokkaido University | And 7 more authors.
Journal of the Faculty of Agriculture, Kyushu University | Year: 2010

We experimentally examined the artificial cultivation of Pholiota nameko, a hardwood-rotting and excellent edible mushroom, on beds of logs from thinned Cryptomeria japonica and Chamaecyparis obtusa. The water content of logs was 62.43% for Cr. japonica and 51.11% for Ch. obtusa. The sapwood, bark, and hardwood water contents were similar in the two species. Both tree species were suitable for P. nameko cultivation, but the numbers and fresh weight of fruiting bodies were higher on Ch. obtusa than on Cr. japonica. The number of pores drilled into logs for inoculation with fungal mycelia influences mushroom production. The number of inoculated pores per log did not affect mushroom production in Ch. obtusa, but more pores were required to produce more mushrooms in Cr. japonica. Hence, logs of Ch. obtusa are more suitable than logs of Cr. japonica to produce this mushroom because the fruiting bodies form on both the cross-sectional surfaces of Ch. obtusa, as well as on the bark.


Cha J.Y.,Laboratory of Forest Resources Management | Cha J.Y.,Hokkaido University | Lee S.Y.,Laboratory of Forest Resources Management | Lee S.Y.,Kangwon National University | And 3 more authors.
Journal of the Faculty of Agriculture, Kyushu University | Year: 2010

This report provides the first record of Mycena overholtsii from Japan, and macro-and microscopic features are described and illustrated. This species was found growing in clusters on conifer logs and stumps near melting snowbanks. It was named "yukitsutsumikunugitake' in Japanese.

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