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Lee S.-Y.,Laboratory of Forest Resources Management | Lee S.-Y.,Kangwon National University | Chae H.-M.,Laboratory of Forest Resources Management | Chae H.-M.,Korea Climate Change Countermeasure Research Center | And 3 more authors.
Journal of the Faculty of Agriculture, Kyushu University | Year: 2010

We investigated Japanese red pine (Pinus densiflora Siebold et Zuccarini) mortality that resulted from a 17,097 ha forest fire that occurred in eastern Korea in April of 2000. We developed a logistic regression model that relates the probability of tree mortality to diameter at breast height (DBH) and height of stem blackening (HSB) and found the probability of tree mortality increased as the HSB increased and DBH decreased. We compare those results with stem mortality models developed for Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) in Sweden and Eastern white pine (Pinus strobes, L.) in Canada and discuss the need for methodologies that can be used to develop comparable models. Source


Cha J.Y.,Laboratory of Forest Resources Management | Cha J.Y.,Hokkaido University | Lee S.Y.,Laboratory of Forest Resources Management | Lee S.Y.,Kangwon National University | And 3 more authors.
Journal of the Faculty of Agriculture, Kyushu University | Year: 2010

This report provides the first record of Mycena overholtsii from Japan, and macro-and microscopic features are described and illustrated. This species was found growing in clusters on conifer logs and stumps near melting snowbanks. It was named "yukitsutsumikunugitake' in Japanese. Source


Jun K.-W.,Laboratory of Forest Resources Management | Jun K.-W.,Korea University | Oh C.-Y.,Laboratory of Forest Resources Management | Oh C.-Y.,Korea University | And 5 more authors.
Journal of the Faculty of Agriculture, Kyushu University | Year: 2015

Extreme climate phenomena are occurring around the world caused by global climate change, and Korea is no exception. Heavy rains continue to occur in Korea, which exceed the previous highest rainfall records. In particular, as flash floods generate heavy rainfall on the mountains over a relatively a short period of time, the likelihood of landslides increases. Therefore, it is necessary to scientifically analyze landslide risk areas to minimize damage in the event of a landslide, and to collect and analyze a variety of spatial information. This study constructs a spatial information database using GIS and integrating geography, hydrology, geology, and forestry, which is required for a complete analysis of landslide risk areas. We also carried out a case study of Injegun, Gangwondo, which suffered from serious landslides and flash floods in 2006 after Typhoon Ewiniar, by overlaying site monitoring data with airborne images. Furthermore, this study evaluates slope stability of the affected areas using SINMAP (Stability Index Mapping), analyzes spatial data that have high correlation with selected landslide areas using Likelihood Ratio, and prepares landslide prediction of the mountainous areas that are vulnerable to disasters. Source


Lee K.-H.,Laboratory of Forest Resources Management | Lee K.-H.,Chonnam National University | Luong T.-H.,Laboratory of Forest Resources Management | Luong T.-H.,Chonnam National University | And 7 more authors.
Journal of the Faculty of Agriculture, Kyushu University | Year: 2015

Annual tree rings may have information to help investigate the effects of environmental change caused by temperature, air pollution, and acid rain on tree growth. Annual tree ring growth in relation to environmental changes was studied by analysing the chemistry of tree rings of Larix leptolepis (L. leptolepis) and Cryptomeria japonica (C. japonica) in southern Korea. Tree ring growth (diameter, annual increments of ring area) and tree ring chemistry (δ13C, δ; 15N, N) concentration, and Ca/Al ratios of both species were analysed. Regression analysis was conducted between tree ring data and environmental variables. Annual tree ring growth significantly differed between the two species and increased over time (p<0.01). The growth rate of L. leptolepis (ring width and ring area) was lower than that of C. japonica. Temperature, CO2, NO2, and SO2 affected (p<0.05) the tree ring area increment of C. japonica, and SO, affected (p<0.05) the tree ring area increment of L. leptolepis. The relationships of temperature, SO2, and NO2 concentrations with tree ring δ 13C of both species (p<0.05) increased C isotope discrimination (Δ) and affected tree ring growth. There was a negative correlation between annual ring area and A in tree rings of L. leptolepis (p<0.01). For C. japonica, Δ was positively correlated (p<0.01) with annual ring area. The correlation of precipitation pH with tree ring δ 13C, δ 15N, and N concentration of the two species (p<0.01) could provide information on N deposition due to the H+ input from acid rain. Tree ring δ 15N and N concentration may be useful as indicators for precipitation pH. Tree ring growth was influenced by climate change, atmosphere pollutants and precipitation pH. The effects of increased temperature, atmosphere pollutants, and acid precipitation on radial growth may reflect N deposition from fossil fuel combustion. Acid deposition at the study site affected tree ring growth and both species may be at risk from the long-term effects of acid deposition over time. Source


Park G.-S.,Laboratory of Forest Resources Management | Park G.-S.,Chungnam National University | Rang G.-N.,Laboratory of Forest Resources Management | Rang G.-N.,Korea forest Research Institute | And 9 more authors.
Journal of the Faculty of Agriculture, Kyushu University | Year: 2010

This study was carried out to estimate annual carbon production by fine root in Pinus densiflora, Pinus koraiensis, Larix leptolepis and Quercus acutissima stands of Gongju region, Korea. Soil samples were taken at 0-30 cm, 30-60 cm, and 60-90 cm soil depths from April to November (monthly increment method) in 2007 using soil sampler. Fine root carbon biomass was higher at 0-30 cm soil depth than in the other soil depths. Total fine root carbon biomass at 0-90 cm soil depth was highest in Larix leptolespis stand among the four study stands. Net fine root carbon production (kg ha -1 yr -1) in Pinus densiflora, Pinus koraiensis, Larix leptolepis and Quercus acutissima stands were 889 kg, 2,266 kg, 851 kg, and 1,121 kg at 0-30 cm soil depth, respectively. Total net fine root carbon production (kg ha -1 yr -1) was highest in Pinus koraiensis stand among the four study stands. Fine root turnover rates in the four stands were ranged from 0.59 to 2.63 at 0-30 cm, 30-60 cm, and 60-90 cm soil depth. Source

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