Laboratory Of Ecologia

Brasília, Brazil

Laboratory Of Ecologia

Brasília, Brazil
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Cueva del Castillo R.,Laboratory Of Ecologia | Sanabria-Urban S.,Laboratory Of Ecologia | Serrano-Meneses M.A.,Autonomous University of Tlaxcala
Ecology and Evolution | Year: 2015

Trade-offs between life-history traits - such as fecundity and survival - have been demonstrated in several studies. In eusocial insects, the number of organisms and their body sizes can affect the fitness of the colony. Large-than-average body sizes as well as more individuals can improve a colony's thermoregulation, foraging efficiency, and fecundity. However, in bumblebees, large colonies and large body sizes depend largely on high temperatures and a large amount of food resources. Bumblebee taxa can be found in temperate and tropical regions of the world and differ markedly in their colony sizes and body sizes. Variation in colony size and body size may be explained by the costs and benefits associated with the evolutionary history of each species in a particular environment. In this study, we explored the effect of temperature and precipitation (the latter was used as an indirect indicator of food availability) on the colony and body size of twenty-one bumblebee taxa. A comparative analysis controlling for phylogenetic effects as well as for the body size of queens, workers, and males in bumblebee taxa from temperate and tropical regions indicated that both temperature and precipitation affect colony and body size. We found a negative association between colony size and the rainiest trimester, and a positive association between the colony size and the warmest month of the year. In addition, male bumblebees tend to evolve larger body sizes in places where the rain occurs mostly in the summer and the overall temperature is warmer. Moreover, we found a negative relationship between colony size and body sizes of queens, workers, and males, suggesting potential trade-offs in the evolution of bumblebee colony and body size. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.


Velez-Arellano N.,Laboratory Of Histologia Prol Of Carpio Esq | Mendoza-Santana L.E.,Laboratory Of Histologia Prol Of Carpio Esq | Ortiz-Ordonez E.,Laboratory Of Histologia Prol Of Carpio Esq | Guzman Del Proo S.A.,Laboratory Of Ecologia
Hidrobiologica | Year: 2011

The histological gonadal cycle of Tegula aureotincta was determined at Bahia Asuncion Baja California Sur. Monthly samples of 25 to 30 organisms were collected from January to December 2006. They were processed by histological technique, embedded in paraffin, sections 7-μm thick were stained with hematoxylin-eosin. The sex ratio was 1:1. Both sexes presented gametogenesis and maturity stages the year through. Two major spawning events were identified in autumn-winter and spring. The maturity and spawning times have close relations with the seasonal change of sea water temperature.


Ramirez-Delgado V.H.,Laboratory Of Ecologia | Sanabria-Urban S.,Laboratory Of Ecologia | Serrano-Meneses M.A.,Autonomous University of Tlaxcala | Cueva del Castillo R.,Laboratory Of Ecologia
Ecology and Evolution | Year: 2016

Two patterns commonly emerge when animal body size is analyzed as a function of latitudinal distribution. First, body size increases with latitude, a temperature effect known as Bergmann's rule, and second, the converse to Bergmann's rule, a pattern in which body size decreases with latitude. However, other geographic patterns can emerge when the mechanisms that generate Bergmann's and the converse to Bergmann's clines operate together. Here, we use phylogenetic comparative analysis in order to control for phylogenetic inertia, and we show that bumblebees exhibit the converse to Bergmann's rule. Bumblebee taxa are distributed worldwide in temperate and tropical regions. The largest species are found in places with high water availability during the driest time of the year. Nonetheless, large body size is constrained by extreme temperatures. Bumblebees’ body size could be related to a higher extent to the size of food rewards to be harvested than to the energetic advantages of thermoregulation. Moreover, we found that the body size of eusocial and cuckoo species responded in the same way to environmental variables, suggesting that they have not diverged due to different selective pressures. © 2016 The Authors. Ecology and Evolution published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.


Pimenta M.,Laboratory Of Ecologia | De Marco P.,Federal University of Goais
Neotropical Entomology | Year: 2015

In landscape mosaics, species may use different vegetation types or be restricted to a single vegetation type or land-use feature highlighting the importance of the interaction of species requirements and environmental heterogeneity. In these systems, the determination of the overall pattern of β-diversity can indicate the importance of the environmental heterogeneity on diversity patterns. Here, we evaluate leaf beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) as habitat quality bioindicators in a system with varying intensities of human impacts and different phyto-physiognomies (from open field to forests). We collected 1117 leaf beetles belonging to 245 species, of which 12 species and 5 genus were considered possible bioindicators based on IndVal measures. Higher species richness was observed in forests and regenerating fields, and habitats with lower species richness included pastures, mines, and veredas. Natural fields, regenerating fields, natural cerrado, and forest had higher values of β-diversity. Bioindicator systems that include not only species richness and abundance but also assemblage composition are needed to allow for a better understanding of Chrysomelidae response to environmental disturbance. © 2015, Sociedade Entomológica do Brasil.


PubMed | Laboratory Of Ecologia
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Neotropical entomology | Year: 2015

In landscape mosaics, species may use different vegetation types or be restricted to a single vegetation type or land-use feature highlighting the importance of the interaction of species requirements and environmental heterogeneity. In these systems, the determination of the overall pattern of -diversity can indicate the importance of the environmental heterogeneity on diversity patterns. Here, we evaluate leaf beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) as habitat quality bioindicators in a system with varying intensities of human impacts and different phyto-physiognomies (from open field to forests). We collected 1117 leaf beetles belonging to 245 species, of which 12 species and 5 genus were considered possible bioindicators based on IndVal measures. Higher species richness was observed in forests and regenerating fields, and habitats with lower species richness included pastures, mines, and veredas. Natural fields, regenerating fields, natural cerrado, and forest had higher values of -diversity. Bioindicator systems that include not only species richness and abundance but also assemblage composition are needed to allow for a better understanding of Chrysomelidae response to environmental disturbance.

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