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De Araujo A.L.,Laboratory of Dermatology and Immunodeficiencies | Silva L.C.R.,Laboratory of Dermatology and Immunodeficiencies | Fernandes J.R.,Laboratory of Dermatology and Immunodeficiencies | Benard G.,Laboratory of Dermatology and Immunodeficiencies | Benard G.,University of Sao Paulo
Immunotherapy | Year: 2013

There is now a strong body of evidence demonstrating that aging is accompanied by severe alterations in the immune system, a process known as immunosenescence. Among these changes are alterations in T-cell subpopulation size, cytokine secretion pattern, cell replicative capacity and antibody production, all of which culminate in a proinflammatory state called 'inflammaging' and a diminished capacity to respond to new antigens. These alterations are closely related to the increased mortality and morbidity rates observed in this population. However, the role of exercise on the prevention or treatment of immunosenescence is virtually unknown. Data gathered from the literature regarding the effects of physical activity on immune system aging are still limited and conflicting, with existing reports either advocating benefits or asserting a lack of evidence. Exercise as part of a healthy lifestyle has already been shown to provide long-term benefits with regard to cardiovascular, cognitive, psychosocial and other aspects of the elderly. If positive effects are also observed for immunosenescence, exercise could be a highly cost-effective measure to improve human quality of life compared with other strategies currently being pursued. © 2013 Future Medicine Ltd. Source


Silva L.C.R.,Laboratory of Dermatology and Immunodeficiencies | Ortigosa L.C.M.,Laboratory of Dermatology and Immunodeficiencies | Benard G.,Laboratory of Dermatology and Immunodeficiencies | Benard G.,University of Sao Paulo
Immunotherapy | Year: 2010

TNF-α is a potent inducer of the inflammatory response, a key regulator of innate immunity and plays an important role in the regulation of Th1 immune responses against intracellular bacteria and certain viral infections. However, dysregulated TNF can also contribute to numerous pathological situations. These include immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs) including rheumatoid arthritis, Crohns disease, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, ulcerative colitis and severe chronic plaque psoriasis. Animal and human studies concerning the role of TNF-α in IMIDs have led to the development of a therapy based on TNF blockage. This article focuses first on the potential mechanisms by which the three currently licensed agents, adalimumab, etarnecept and infliximab, decrease the inflammatory activity of patients with different IMIDs. Second, it focuses on the risks, precautions and complications of the use of TNF-α inhibitors in these patients. © 2010 Future Medicine Ltd. Source


de Araujo A.L.,Laboratory of Dermatology and Immunodeficiencies | Silva L.C.R.,Laboratory of Dermatology and Immunodeficiencies | Fernandes J.R.,Laboratory of Dermatology and Immunodeficiencies | Matias M.S.T.,University of Sao Paulo | And 5 more authors.
Age | Year: 2015

We aimed to verify whether different levels of training performed regularly and voluntarily for many years could have an impact on one of the main issues of immunosenescence: the poor response to vaccines. We recruited 61 healthy elderly men (65–85 years old), 23 with a moderate training (MT) lifestyle (for 17.0 ± 3.2 years), 22 with an intense training (IT) lifestyle (for 25.9 ± 3.4 years), and 16 without a training lifestyle (NT). Fitness was evaluated through the IPAQ and VO2max consumption. The participants were evaluated regarding cognitive aspects, nutritional status, depression, and quality of life. Antibody titers were determined by hemagglutination inhibition assay prior to influenza vaccination and at 6 weeks and 6 months post-vaccination. Strains used were B, H3N2, and H1N1. Our groups were matched for most characteristics, except for those directly influenced by their lifestyles, such as BMI, VO2max, and MET. In general, MT and IT elderly men showed significantly higher antibody titers to the three vaccine strains post-vaccination than NT elderly men. There were also higher titers against B and H1N1 strains in the trained groups before vaccination. Additionally, there were higher proportions of seroprotected (titers ≥1:40) individuals in the pooled trained groups both at 6 weeks (B and H3N2, p < 0.05) and 6 months (H1N1, p < 0.05; B, p = 0.07). There were no significant differences between the MT and IT groups. Either a moderate or an intense training is associated with stronger and longstanding antibody responses to the influenza vaccine, resulting in higher percentages of seroprotected individuals. © 2015, American Aging Association. Source

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