Laboratory of Bacteriology Virology

University of Technology of Compiègne, France

Laboratory of Bacteriology Virology

University of Technology of Compiègne, France
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Riabi S.,Laboratory of Transmissible Diseases LR99 ES27 | Riabi S.,Laboratory of Bacteriology Virology | Harrath R.,Laboratory of Transmissible Diseases LR99 ES27 | Harrath R.,Laboratory of Bacteriology Virology | And 7 more authors.
Journal of Biomedical Science | Year: 2014

Background: Decay Accelerating Factor (DAF) and Coxsackievirus-Adenovirus Receptor (CAR) have been identified as cellular receptors for Coxsackie B viruses (CV-B). The aim of this study is to elucidate the different binding properties of CV-B serotypes and to find out if there are any amino acid changes that could be associated to the different phenotypes.Twenty clinical CV-B isolates were tested on CaCo-2 cell line using anti-DAF (BRIC216) and anti-CAR (RmcB) antibodies. CV-B3 Nancy prototype strain and a recombinant strain (Rec, CV-B3/B4) were tested in parallel. The P1 genomic region of 12 CV-B isolates from different serotypes was sequenced and the Trans-Epithelial Electrical Resistance (TEER) along with the virus growth cycle was measured. Results: Infectivity assays revealed clear differences between CV-B isolates with regard to their interactions with DAF and CAR. All tested CV-B isolates showed an absolute requirement for CAR but varied in their binding to DAF. We also reported that for some isolates of CV-B, DAF attachment was not adapted. Genetic analysis of the P1 region detected multiple differences in the deduced amino acid sequences. Conclusion: Within a given serotype, variations exist in the capacity of virus isolates to bind to specific receptors, and variants with different additional ligands may arise during infection in humans as well as in tissue culture. © 2014Riabi et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


PubMed | Laboratory of Bacteriology Virology, University Hospital of Mahdia, University of Monastir and University of Sousse
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Eastern Mediterranean health journal = La revue de sante de la Mediterranee orientale = al-Majallah al-sihhiyah li-sharq al-mutawassit | Year: 2015

Data on the economic burden of rotavirus infection in Tunisia are needed to inform the decision to include rotavirus in routine childhood immunizations. This study aimed to describe the epidemiological profile of rotavirus disease in central-east Tunisia and to estimate its hospital cost. In the first stage - the prospective collection of epidemiological data - we enrolled all patients < 5 years old who were hospitalized for acute diarrhoea at 5 university paediatric departments in central-east Tunisia during the period 2009-2011. Rotavirus was responsible for 65 (23.3%) of the 279 cases enrolled. In the second stage, cost data were collected retrospectively using an activity-based costing method from the medical records of the children who were positively diagnosed with rotavirus. The average cost of care per child was TD 433 (SD 134). This is a significant economic burden in Tunisia, where a safe and effective vaccine is available but not yet introduced to the immunization schedule.


Saba E.S.,InfYnity Biomarkers | Saba E.S.,Laboratory of Bacteriology Virology | Gueyffier L.,InfYnity Biomarkers | Dichtel-Danjoy M.-L.,InfYnity Biomarkers | And 8 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2013

Cross-reactive antibodies are characterized by their recognition of antigens that are different from the trigger immunogen. This happens when the similarity between two different antigenic determinants becomes adequate enough to enable a specific binding with such cross-reactive antibodies. In the present manuscript, we report the presence, at an "abnormal" high frequency, of antibodies in blood samples from French human subjects cross-reacting with a synthetic-peptide antigen derived from a Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) protein sequence. As the vector of T. cruzi is virtually confined to South America, the parasite is unlikely to be the trigger immunogen of the cross-reactive antibodies detected in France. At present, the cross-reactive antibodies are measured by using an in-house ELISA method that employs the T. cruzi -peptide antigen. However, to underline their cross-reactive characteristics, we called these antibodies "Trypanosoma cruzi Cross Reactive Antibodies" or TcCRA. To validate their cross-reactive nature, these antibodies were affinity-purified from plasma of healthy blood donor and were then shown to specifically react with the T. cruzi parasite by immunofluorescence. Seroprevalence of TcCRA was estimated at 45% in serum samples of French blood donors while the same peptide-antigen reacts with about 96% of T. cruzi -infected Brazilian individuals. In addition, we compared the serology of TcCRA to other serologies such as HSV 1/2, EBV, HHV-6, CMV, VZV, adenovirus, parvovirus B19, mumps virus, rubella virus, respiratory syncytial virus, measles and enterovirus. No association was identified to any of the tested viruses. Furthermore, we tested sera from different age groups for TcCRA and found a progressive acquisition starting from early childhood. Our findings show a large seroprevalence of cross-reactive antibodies to a well-defined T. cruzi antigen and suggest they are induced by a widely spread immunogen, acquired from childhood. The etiology of TcCRA and their clinical relevance still need to be investigated. © 2013 Saba et al.


Cross-reactive antibodies are characterized by their recognition of antigens that are different from the trigger immunogen. This happens when the similarity between two different antigenic determinants becomes adequate enough to enable a specific binding with such cross-reactive antibodies. In the present manuscript, we report the presence, at an abnormal high frequency, of antibodies in blood samples from French human subjects cross-reacting with a synthetic-peptide antigen derived from a Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) protein sequence. As the vector of T. cruzi is virtually confined to South America, the parasite is unlikely to be the trigger immunogen of the cross-reactive antibodies detected in France. At present, the cross-reactive antibodies are measured by using an in-house ELISA method that employs the T. cruzi -peptide antigen. However, to underline their cross-reactive characteristics, we called these antibodies Trypanosoma cruzi Cross Reactive Antibodies or TcCRA. To validate their cross-reactive nature, these antibodies were affinity-purified from plasma of healthy blood donor and were then shown to specifically react with the T. cruzi parasite by immunofluorescence. Seroprevalence of TcCRA was estimated at 45% in serum samples of French blood donors while the same peptide-antigen reacts with about 96% of T. cruzi -infected Brazilian individuals. In addition, we compared the serology of TcCRA to other serologies such as HSV 1/2, EBV, HHV-6, CMV, VZV, adenovirus, parvovirus B19, mumps virus, rubella virus, respiratory syncytial virus, measles and enterovirus. No association was identified to any of the tested viruses. Furthermore, we tested sera from different age groups for TcCRA and found a progressive acquisition starting from early childhood. Our findings show a large seroprevalence of cross-reactive antibodies to a well-defined T. cruzi antigen and suggest they are induced by a widely spread immunogen, acquired from childhood. The etiology of TcCRA and their clinical relevance still need to be investigated.

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