Laboratory of Agricultural Ecology

Plant, Japan

Laboratory of Agricultural Ecology

Plant, Japan
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Geng X.M.,Laboratory of Agricultural Ecology | Geng X.M.,Nanjing Forestry University | Li M.,Laboratory of Agricultural Ecology | Li M.,Nanjing Forestry University | And 5 more authors.
Journal of the Faculty of Agriculture, Kyushu University | Year: 2015

With the delay of harvest stage, the carbohydrate content of flower petals and the diameter of flower buds increased, but the vase life was shortened. Effects of abscisic acid (ABA) and sucrose on preservation of cut lilies were related to the harvest stage. Due to the lower level of soluble sugars and other energy source in early harvested cut lilies, the sucrose pretreatment turned to be particularly effective for extending the vase life and increasing the flower fresh weight and bud diameter. For the cut flowers harvested at middle stage, pretreatment with sucrose or ABA separately enhanced the preservation effect, which was not observed when pretreated with the combination of sucrose and ABA. The preservation effect of the harvested flowers at the late development stage was increased by the ABA pretreatments including ABA alone or ABA and sucrose (ABA+Suc). ABA improved sucrose uptake from the pretreatment solution and increased soluble sugar contents in cut flower petals. Combined with sucrose pretreatment, addition of ABA alleviated leaf chlorosis symptom of cut flowers harvested in early period.


Geng X.M.,Laboratory of Agricultural Ecology | Geng X.M.,Nanjing Forestry University | Liu J.,Laboratory of Agricultural Ecology | Liu J.,Nanjing Forestry University | And 5 more authors.
Journal of the Faculty of Agriculture, Kyushu University | Year: 2015

Although it is often considered as a senescence phytohormone, abscisic acid (ABA) at low concentration together with sucrose as pulsing solution displayed preservative effect on cut lily flowers. In order to further clarify the preservation mechanism of ABA, the effects of ABA pretreatment on physiological index and ethylene release were investigated. The addition of 2 mg · L-1 ABA to sucrose increased proline content in petals. This result suggested that ABA application resulted in water stress of the cut flowers to some extent. However the pretreatment of the cut lilies with ABA at 2 mg · L-1 delayed the degradation of soluble proteins, and promoted the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzyme, which decreased the damage to cells induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS). It was also found that the pretreatment with 2mg L-1 ABA inhibited ethylene release.


Tateishi N.,Laboratory of Horticultural Science | Ozaki Y.,Laboratory of Horticultural Science | Ozaki Y.,Laboratory of Agricultural Ecology | Okubo H.,Laboratory of Horticultural Science
Journal of the Faculty of Agriculture, Kyushu University | Year: 2010

Partial cDNA sequences of three anthocyanin biosynthetic genes (F3H, flavanone 3-hydroxylase; DFR, dihydroflavonol 4-reductase; ANS, anthocyanidin synthase) were isolated from the petals of Camellia japonica. Their deduced partial amino acid sequences shared high homologies with those of woody plant species (CjF3Ha, 98.0%, CjF3Hb, 91.2% and CjDFR, 99.0% with Camellia sinensis; CjANS, 90.3% with Rhododendron x pulchrum). Some important amino acid residues for enzymatic activities were also conserved in the isolated clones, suggesting that the genes we identified in this study were the homologues of C. japonica. Gene-specific primer pairs were designed based on each partial cDNA sequence. The application of these primer pairs to RT-PCR analyses was tested.


Xuan B.,Laboratory of Horticultural Science | Xuan B.,Thai Nguyen University | Wakana A.,Laboratory of Horticultural Science | Kim J.H.,Laboratory of Horticultural Science | And 3 more authors.
Journal of the Faculty of Agriculture, Kyushu University | Year: 2010

Self-incompatibility S genotypes of 29 Citrus cultivars were estimated by the observation of pollen tube behavior in the lower one-third of styles with the aid of an epifluorescent microscope 7 or 8 days after controlled pollination with restricted number of pollen grains (about 100) on their stigmas. In eight crosses considered to be fully compatible on the basis of segregation distortion of glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT) isozymes in the progenies of cultivars used for the crosses, the rate of pollen tubes reaching the style base ranged from 7.7% to 24.6% of pollen grains putting on the stigmas, while in twelve crosses considered to be semi-compatible the rate of pollen tubes reaching the style base ranged from 1.6% to 19.3% of pollen grains on the stigmas. The rates were slightly different in different pistillate parents. Twenty cultivars whose genotypes were not determined were pollinated with restricted number of 'Banpeiyu' (S 1S 2) pollen grains and their genotypes were predicted by the pollen tube behaviors. Similarly, 13 controlled crosses were carried out with restricted number of pollen grains and their S genotypes were determined based on the number of pollen tubes reaching the style base. From these results, it became clear that the predicted S genotypes of the cultivars are well correspond with pollen tube behaviors in full or semi compatible crosses and, eventually, it was estimated that 15 cultivars have either S 1 or S 2 allele that 'Banpeiyu' pummelo has.


Oh T.-K.,Kyushu University | Nakaji K.,Kyushu University | Nakaji K.,Laboratory of Agricultural Ecology | Chikushi J.,Kyushu University | Park S.-G.,Kyushu University
Journal of the Faculty of Agriculture, Kyushu University | Year: 2010

The effectiveness of the application of water treatment sludge (WTS) to soils for cultivating a vegetable was examined Initially, properties of original WTS, decomposed granite (DG) soil and volcanic ash (VA) soils were investigated, including physical properties of water content, porosity, dry density, saturated hydraulic conductivity, and texture and chemical properties of pH, EC, organic matter content, CEC, phosphate adsorption coefficient, and C, N, and H contents. Lettuce (Lactuca satuva L.) was grown in a phytotron room at a temperature of 20 °C using pots filled with DG soil and VA soil mixed with WTS at rates of 0 (N-P-K standard fertilizer application), 0,4.5, and 9.0 Mg ha -1. The yields of lettuce grown for the treatments of 4.5, and 9.0 Mg ha -1 sludge addition in VA soil were lower by 38% and 7% compared with the treatment of 0Mg ha -1 sludge addition, respectively. However, the yield in DG soil was significantly higher by 72% (4.5 Mg ha -1 WTS addition) and 71% (9.0 Mg ha -1 WTS addition) compared with 0 Mg ha -1 sludge addition, respectively. These results suggest that land application of WTS may act positively to organic matterdeficient soils like DG soil, but negatively to fertile soil like VA soil.


Yamaguchi Y.,Laboratory of Agricultural Ecology | Yamaguchi Y.,University of León | Maldonado A.I.L.,Laboratory of Agricultural Ecology | Nakaji K.,Laboratory of Agricultural Ecology
Journal of the Faculty of Agriculture, Kyushu University | Year: 2010

The predator (Golden apple snail)-prey (rice or weeds) model developed in a previous research (Luna et al., 2008c) and the Simulink model constructed for image processing analysis were improved in order to observe and measure the activity of snails by calculating of speed of them using the AVI (Audio Video Interleave) files reported in earlier paper (Yamaguchi et al., 2008). The improved Predator -Prey Model are thought to be more realistic and the improved Simulink model is able to calculate the speed of two snails at the same time. By introducing these models into the intelligent robot, it will be able to calculate the activity of snails in paddy and determine the more appropriate time of picking up the snails and control the ecosystem of paddy field.


Win K.T.,Laboratory of Agricultural Ecology | Win K.T.,Laboratory of Plant Breeding | Mochizuki T.,Laboratory of Agricultural Ecology
Journal of the Faculty of Agriculture, Kyushu University | Year: 2010

Rice genotypes with improved N-use efficiency are becoming a prerequisite for optimizing grain yield, reducing production cost, and developing environmentally friendly cropping systems. The physiological efficiency of grain (PE-grain) and biomass (PE-biomass), photosynthetic N-use efficiency (PNUE), and in vivo carboxylation efficiency of Rubisco (Pn/Rubisco) under varying N nutrition conditions were investigated in two Myanmar varieties (Bawgyi and Sawbwa), an indica variety (IR24), and a japonica control variety (Nipponbare). Nipponbare and IR24 had significantly higher grain yield and PE-grain at both soil N and standard N supply, Bawgyi exhibited moderately high grain yield and PE-grain, and Sawbwa had a low grain yield and PE-grain at both N levels. Nipponbare and IR24 had significantly higher PE-biomass at all N levels; while Bawgyi had lower PE-biomass than Nipponbare and IR24 at all N levels, its PE-biomass was significantly higher than that of Sawbwa at the low N level. Net photosynthesis (Pn) of Bawgyi was not significantly different from that of Nipponbare and IR24, but was higher than that of Sawbwa, even with no significant difference in leaf N content. Nipponbare, IR24, and Bawgyi showed no significant difference in PNUE, but had significantly higher PNUE than Sawbwa, especially at low and standard N levels. There was no significant difference in Pn/Rubisco among Bawgyi, Nipponbare, and IR24, but Pn/Rubisco was significantly higher in these varieties than in Sawbwa at low and standard N levels. PE-biomass corresponded well to PE-grain and showed significant positive correlations with PNUE and Pn/Rubisco, indicating that rice genotypes with high physiological efficiency have high Pn with low leaf N and low Rubisco content with high Rubisco efficiency. These results suggest that, of the two Myanmar rice varieties, Bawgyi is the more desirable genotype, with considerably higher physiological efficiency and high photosynthetic activity through the highly efficient use of Rubisco.

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