Laboratory for the Research and Investigation of Veterinary Drugs and Disinfectants

Saint-André-de-la-Marche, France

Laboratory for the Research and Investigation of Veterinary Drugs and Disinfectants

Saint-André-de-la-Marche, France

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Kesteman A.-S.,National Veterinary School of Toulouse | Kesteman A.-S.,Laboratory for the Research and Investigation of Veterinary Drugs and Disinfectants | Perrin-Guyomard A.,Laboratory for the Research and Investigation of Veterinary Drugs and Disinfectants | Laurentie M.,Laboratory for the Research and Investigation of Veterinary Drugs and Disinfectants | And 3 more authors.
Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy | Year: 2010

Antibiotic treatment of lung infections may lead to the emergence of resistance in the gut flora. Appropriate dosing regimens could mitigate this adverse effect. In gnotobiotic rats harboring intestinal Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecium populations, a lung infection by Klebsiella pneumoniae was instigated with two different sizes of inoculum to represent an early or a late initiation of antibiotic treatment. The rats were treated with marbofloxacin, an expanded-spectrum fluoroquinolone, by a single-shot administration or a fractionated regimen over 4 days. Intestinal bacterial populations were monitored during and after treatment. At the infection site, bacterial cure without any selection of resistance was observed. Whatever the dosage regimen, fluoroquinolone treatment had a transient negative impact on the E. coli gut population but not on that of E. faecium. The intestinal flora was colonized by the pathogenic lung bacteria, and there was the emergence of intestine-resistant K. pneumoniae, occurring more often in animals treated with a single marbofloxacin dose than with the fractionated dose. Bacterial cure without resistance selection at the infection site with fluoroquinolone treatment can be linked to colonization of the digestive tract by targeted pulmonary bacteria, followed by the emergence of resistance. Copyright © 2010, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.


Faure S.,Laboratory for the Research and Investigation of Veterinary Drugs and Disinfectants | Perrin-Guyomard A.,Laboratory for the Research and Investigation of Veterinary Drugs and Disinfectants | Delmas J.M.,Laboratory for the Research and Investigation of Veterinary Drugs and Disinfectants | Chatre P.,Bacteriology Unit | Laurentie M.,Laboratory for the Research and Investigation of Veterinary Drugs and Disinfectants
Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy | Year: 2010

Food animals are a potential source of CTX-M resistance genes for humans. We evaluated the transfer of the blaCTX-M-9 gene from an animal strain of Salmonella enterica serotype Virchow to Enterobacteriaceae of the human intestinal flora by using human flora-associated (HFA) rats with and without cefixime treatment. In the absence of antibiotic, no transconjugant enterobacteria were found in the feces of HFA rats. However, the transfer rate was high if Escherichia coli J5 recipient strains were coinoculated orally with Salmonella. S. enterica serotype Virchow persisted in the rat fecal flora both during and after treatment with therapeutic doses of cefixime. The drug did not increase the transfer rate, and E. coli J5 transconjugants were eliminated from the flora before the end of cefixime treatment. No cefixime was recovered in the rat feces. In the presence of recipient strains, the blaCTX-M-9 resistance gene was transferred from a strain of animal origin to the human intestinal flora, although transconjugant colonization was transient. Antibiotic use enhanced the persistence of donor strains, increasing the resistance gene pool and the risk of its spread. Copyright © 2010, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

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