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Keller C.M.,Lincoln Laboratory | Whipple G.H.,Laboratory for Telecommunication Sciences at College Park
Conference Record - Asilomar Conference on Signals, Systems and Computers | Year: 2015

Information theoretic upper bounds on the number of distinguishable classes enable assessments of feasibility when applying classification techniques [1][2]. A goal of this paper is to examine the behavior of these upper bounds as the items being classified become more complex in the sense that the number of degrees of freedom increases. We synthesize filters with different numbers of stages to represent items with various levels of complexity. Using a typical distribution for component tolerances, we study whether different instantiations of filters with greater numbers of components (stages) are more distinguishable than filters with fewer components. We examine the behavior of the Fano upper bound for the number of distinguishable classes as a function of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), to make the comparisons. © 2014 IEEE. Source


Georgakopoulos A.,WINGS Inc | Margaris A.,WINGS Inc | Tsagkaris K.,WINGS Inc | Demestichas P.,University of Piraeus | Demestichas P.,Laboratory for Telecommunication Sciences at College Park
IEEE Vehicular Technology Magazine | Year: 2016

Wireless networks have made huge progress over the past three decades. Nevertheless, emerging fifth-generation (5G) networks are under pressure to continue in this direction at an even more rapid pace, at least for the next ten to 20 years. This pressure is exercised by rigid requirements as well as emerging technology trends that are aimed at introducing improvements to the 5G wireless world. © 2016 IEEE. Source


Mailloux L.O.,U.S. Air force | Grimaila M.R.,U.S. Air force | Colombi J.M.,U.S. Air force | Hodson D.D.,U.S. Air force | And 3 more authors.
IEEE Communications Magazine | Year: 2015

Quantum key distribution (QKD) is an innovative technology that exploits the laws of quantum mechanics to generate and distribute a shared cryptographic key for secure communications. The unique nature of QKD ensures that eavesdropping on quantum communications necessarily introduces detectable errors which is desirable for high-security environments. QKD systems have been demonstrated in both freespace and optical fiber configurations, gaining global interest from national laboratories, commercial entities, and the U.S. Department of Defense. However, QKD is a nascent technology where realized systems are constructed from non-ideal components, which can significantly impact system performance and security. In this article, we describe QKD technology as part of a secure communications solution and identify vulnerabilities associated with practical network architectures. In particular, we examine the performance of decoy state enabled QKD systems against a modeled photon number splitting attack and suggest an improvement to the decoy state protocol security condition that does not assume a priori knowledge of the QKD channel efficiency. © 2015 IEEE. Source


Mailloux L.O.,U.S. Air force | Grimaila M.R.,U.S. Air force | Hodson D.D.,U.S. Air force | Baumgartner G.,Laboratory for Telecommunication Sciences at College Park | McLaughlin C.,U.S. Navy
IEEE Security and Privacy | Year: 2015

Quantum key distribution (QKD) exploits the laws of quantum physics to generate shared secret cryptographic keys and can detect eavesdroppers during the key generation process. However, previous QKD research has focused more on theory than practice. © 2015 IEEE. Source


Learned R.E.,Lincoln Laboratory | Pitaro M.,Lincoln Laboratory | Ho M.,Lincoln Laboratory | Kocic M.,Lincoln Laboratory | Whipple G.,Laboratory for Telecommunication Sciences at College Park
Conference Record - Asilomar Conference on Signals, Systems and Computers | Year: 2015

Small cells continue to increase in popularity among 3G and 4G LTE service providers as a solution to provide coverage in dead zones and to offload traffic from the macro base to service more customers without adding more frequency bands. Issues with wide spread deployment of small cells include interference-degraded links and higher dropped call rates. This paper considers HetNets with a dense deployment of closed access femtocells that is likely to be typical for future dense HetNets. We investigate whether a new interference leveraging scheme that relies upon multiuser detection (MUD) can successfully mitigate interference problems arising due to closed access femtocells. A combined Monte Carlo simulation and information theoretical approach is used to compute upper bounds on throughput that can be achieved in the system. The paper compares achievable throughput in HetNets with open access femtocells, closed access femtocells with non-MUD receivers, and closed access femtocells with smart-MUD interference mitigation receivers. Preliminary results shown in this paper indicate that smart-MUD enabled femtocells (HeNBs) can successfully operate in closed access mode and can establish links in occupied bands as well as survive severe interference to already-established small cell and macrocell links. Similarly, preliminary results indicate that smart-MUD enabled UEs can mitigate downlink interference coming from closed access femtocells and significantly improve throughput. © 2014 IEEE. Source

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