Laboratory for Machine Tools and Production Engineering

Aachen, Germany

Laboratory for Machine Tools and Production Engineering

Aachen, Germany
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Leading Manufacturers Are Focusing on Modular Production, Advanced Analytics, Smarter Robots, and Augmented Reality DUSSELDORF, GERMANY--(Marketwired - Dec 6, 2016) - Investments in the factory of the future will pay off, and industrial companies that begin implementation today will save up to 40% of their conversion costs in ten years. To succeed, however, manufacturers have to leverage the potential of modular production concepts and new technologies, as well as optimize their processes. These are the findings of the 2016 Factory of the Future Study, conducted by The Boston Consulting Group (BCG) and the Laboratory for Machine Tools and Production Engineering (WZL) at RWTH Aachen University. "The factory as we know it today will change radically: assembly lines will be replaced by flexible manufacturing islands, and work pieces will communicate even more extensively with production machinery," says Daniel Küpper, a BCG partner and head of the firm's Innovation Center for Operations. More than 750 production managers from leading industrial companies worldwide took part in the study, which focused on the automotive, engineered products, and process industries. Companies in the industrial sector have already recognized the potential of transforming their factories: 74% of respondents said their company had already implemented elements of the factory of the future or planned to do so within the next five years. However, only 25% said they reached their related targets last year. To make the factory of the future a reality, companies have to invest 13% to 19% of one year's revenue across a period of ten years. Future Automotive Production Must Be Highly Flexible Particularly in the automotive industry, flexible plant structures are becoming increasingly significant. In fact, 92% of automotive participants see modular line setups as highly relevant in the factory of the future in 2030. "The growing complexity is the central challenge of production. The factory of the future will have to handle a much larger number of product variations, while at the same time increasing productivity," says Küpper. In addition, 85% of automotive respondents expect smart robots to be highly relevant in 2030, and 72% anticipate the same for big data and analytics. Sixty-five percent of automotive respondents expect augmented reality to be highly relevant, particularly in vehicle assembly. Using smart glasses, for example, employees will be guided through work processes step by step and notified of any assembly errors or safety hazards. Digital plant logistics and 3D production simulations will be key support systems in the factory of the future, enabling leaner production and faster reaction to more complex customer needs. Strategy, IT Infrastructure, and Employee Qualifications Are Key Enablers "The factory of the future belongs on the agenda of the top management. Its implementation is not just a job for production but for all functions in the company if it's to be successful," says Küpper. Most important, the factory of the future needs a powerful and secure IT infrastructure. Additionally, employee qualifications are key to the transformation agenda. However, 38% of automotive respondents see employee skills as a major challenge. Companies Can Experience the Factory of the Future BCG's Innovation Center for Operations (ICO) gives companies the opportunity to experience the factory of the future. In three model factories in Aachen, Kaiserslautern, and Stuttgart, production managers can test on site how augmented reality, human-robot interfaces, and smart logistics wearables can advance production. Learn more about BCG's Innovation Center for Operations here. A copy of the report can be downloaded at www.bcgperspectives.com. To arrange an interview with one of the authors, please contact Eric Gregoire at +1 617 850 3783 or gregoire.eric@bcg.com. About The Boston Consulting Group The Boston Consulting Group (BCG) is a global management consulting firm and the world's leading advisor on business strategy. We partner with clients from the private, public, and not-for-profit sectors in all regions to identify their highest-value opportunities, address their most critical challenges, and transform their enterprises. Our customized approach combines deep insight into the dynamics of companies and markets with close collaboration at all levels of the client organization. This ensures that our clients achieve sustainable competitive advantage, build more capable organizations, and secure lasting results. Founded in 1963, BCG is a private company with 85 offices in 48 countries. For more information, please visit bcg.com. About bcgperspectives.com Bcgperspectives.com features the latest thinking from BCG experts as well as from CEOs, academics, and other leaders. It covers issues at the top of senior management's agenda. It also provides unprecedented access to BCG's extensive archive of thought leadership stretching back 50 years to the days of Bruce Henderson, the firm's founder and one of the architects of modern management consulting. All of our content -- including videos, podcasts, commentaries, and reports -- can be accessed by PC, mobile, iPad, Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn.


Klocke F.,Laboratory for Machine Tools and Production Engineering | Brecher C.,Laboratory for Machine Tools and Production Engineering | Lopenhaus C.,Laboratory for Machine Tools and Production Engineering | Mazak J.,Laboratory for Machine Tools and Production Engineering
Procedia CIRP | Year: 2017

Designing the cutting process of bevel gears poses a considerable challenge. For understanding as well as analyzing the bevel gear cutting process and eventually predicting the effects on wear behavior, knowledge of the chip geometry, its formation and characteristic values is essential. One existing method for simulating bevel gear cutting is based on a two-dimensional penetration calculation. The objective of this paper is to validate the simulation method by means of the derived flank geometry. As a result, a validated and verified flank geometry is obtained which can be applied to a FE-based tooth contact analysis. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.


Brecher C.,Laboratory for Machine Tools and Production Engineering | Lopenhaus C.,Laboratory for Machine Tools and Production Engineering | Schroers M.,Laboratory for Machine Tools and Production Engineering
Procedia CIRP | Year: 2017

In times of engine downsizing and lightweight design, the dynamic and acoustic behavior of multi-stage gearboxes is becoming increasingly important. One parameter is the manufacturing quality of the gears which can be expressed by DIN standard and is influenced among other things by the production process. The presented objective is the analyzation of the dynamic behavior with focusing dynamic interactions of two-stage gearboxes. To achieve this goal, gears with different micro geometries and the interactions between the meshes are investigated mathematically. Therefore, a dynamic multi body simulation model is presented in which gear meshes will be described as force coupling elements. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.


Brecher C.,Laboratory for Machine Tools and Production Engineering | Klocke F.,Laboratory for Machine Tools and Production Engineering | Lopenhaus C.,Laboratory for Machine Tools and Production Engineering | Hubner F.,Laboratory for Machine Tools and Production Engineering
Procedia CIRP | Year: 2017

Determining the cutting forces poses one of the main challenges in generating gear grinding due to their significant influence on the dynamics of the grinding process. Thus, optimizing the cutting forces can lead to an increased quality of ground gears and a minimized wear of the grinding worm. This paper focusses on the analysis of single and multiple abrasive grits during the cutting process. Research focuses are the grinding forces and scratches in the material. With this data, a cutting force model for generating gear grinding can be enhanced ensuring a more precise analysis of the gear grinding process. Beneath the cutting forces, the ground gear topography including surface roughness can be simulated and evaluated according to common standards. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.


News Article | December 9, 2015
Site: www.materialstoday.com

The Fraunhofer Institutes for Production Technology IPT and Laser Technology ILT, and RWTH Aachen University’s Laboratory for Machine Tools and Production Engineering (WZL) have launched the International Center for Turbomachinery Manufacturing (ICTM) in Aachen together with 19 renowned industrial partners. The center will focus on research relating to the repair and manufacturing of turbomachines, and, according to one partner, will be used in part to research 3D printing for turbine manufacture. The industrial partners in the new network include turbine manufacturers as well as corporations and medium-sized companies. Another company is interested in improving the surface quality of aerospace components made of titanium. This story is reprinted from material from Fraunhofer Institute, with editorial changes made by Materials Today. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of Elsevier.


Brecher C.,Laboratory for Machine Tools and Production Engineering | Manoharan D.,Laboratory for Machine Tools and Production Engineering | Ladra U.,Siemens AG | Kopken H.-G.,Siemens AG
Production Engineering | Year: 2010

The productivity of machine tools is often limited due to chatter vibrations caused by relative displacements between the tool and the workpiece. The following article presents the systematic approach of the integration of an active workpiece holder with two high dynamic axes controlled by piezoelectric actuators onto a milling machine. With these additional highly dynamic axes near the tool center point, the active workpiece holder offers possibilities to prevent chatter vibrations. © 2010 German Academic Society for Production Engineering (WGP).


Klocke F.,Laboratory for Machine Tools and Production Engineering | Zeis M.,Laboratory for Machine Tools and Production Engineering | Harst S.,Laboratory for Machine Tools and Production Engineering | Klink A.,Laboratory for Machine Tools and Production Engineering | And 2 more authors.
Procedia CIRP | Year: 2013

In order to increase the efficiency of jet engines hard to machine nickel-based and titanium-based alloys are in common use for aero engine components such as blades and blisks (blade integrated disks). Here Electrochemical Machining (ECM) is a promising alternative to milling operations. Due to lack of appropriate process modeling capabilities beforehand still knowledge based and a cost intensive cathode design process is passed through. Therefore this paper presents a multi-physical approach for modeling the ECM material removal process by coupling all relevant conservation equations. The resulting simulation model is validated by the example of a compressor blade. Finally a new approach for an inverted cathode design process is introduced and discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V.


Klocke F.,Laboratory for Machine Tools and Production Engineering | Tonissen S.,Laboratory for Machine Tools and Production Engineering | Wegner H.,Laboratory for Machine Tools and Production Engineering | Roderburg A.,Laboratory for Machine Tools and Production Engineering
Production Engineering | Year: 2011

It is believed that for complex workpieces and small lot sizes complete machining with multi-technology platforms reduces cycle times compared to multiple stand-alone machines and is economically more efficient. However, so far in literature no mathematical model has been applied to compare these alternatives with respect to cost and productivity. This paper introduces a mathematical model for part costs and productivity and examines conditions under which multi-technology platforms are economically efficient. It is concluded that depending on the reduction of reconfiguration and processing times efficient production with multi-technology platforms is not solely limited to small lot sizes. © 2011 German Academic Society for Production Engineering (WGP).


Schuh G.,Laboratory for Machine Tools and Production Engineering | Arnoscht J.,Laboratory for Machine Tools and Production Engineering | Volker M.,Laboratory for Machine Tools and Production Engineering
Procedia CIRP | Year: 2012

The current situation of the manufacturing industry is characterized by permanent development in economics, politics and society. In order to react to those, companies have to be able to adapt the organization to these changes. Therefore a certain degree of changeability is inevitable. Today companies are seeking for the optimal degree of changeability. To determine it and to reduce the necessary changeability, its drivers have to be identified. The main internal factor are the products. Depending on future customer needs and requirements, different products and product designs force companies to change their production systems. Therefore instruments are required which enable companies to reduce the necessary changeability already in the creation process. © 2012 The Authors.


Brecher C.,Laboratory for Machine Tools and Production Engineering | Lopenhaus C.,Laboratory for Machine Tools and Production Engineering | Knecht P.,Laboratory for Machine Tools and Production Engineering
Procedia CIRP | Year: 2016

The transmission error (TE) is a criterion in the design process for gears, as, beside a sufficient load-carrying capacity and good efficiency, noise performance is an important customer demand. For the micro geometry design, the tooth contact analysis (TCA) including the simulation of the manufacturing process for the flank topography is necessary. The objective of this paper is to show potential for the optimization of face-milled bevel gears. Therefore, the FE-based TCA program ZaKo3D was developed. The potential for the acoustic optimization of ground bevel gears in terms of tonality reduction is discussed. Hence, the TCA is performed with a complete tooth hunting, in order to consider all individual flanks of the gear set. Finally, the different topography distributions for a ground design will be discussed in order to understand the optimization potential for a tonality reduction by imitating the lapped topography characteristic. © 2016 The Authors.

Loading Laboratory for Machine Tools and Production Engineering collaborators
Loading Laboratory for Machine Tools and Production Engineering collaborators