Laboratory for Immunogenomics

Laboratory for, Japan

Laboratory for Immunogenomics

Laboratory for, Japan

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Kitamura H.,Nagoya City University | Kimura S.,Laboratory of Histology and Cytology | Shimamoto Y.,Kitasato University | Okabe J.,Monash University | And 16 more authors.
FASEB Journal | Year: 2013

Macrophages play a critical role in chronic inflammation and metabolic diseases. We identified a longer splice variant of ubiquitin specific protease (USP) 2-69 as a novel molecule that modulates pathways implicated in metabolic disorders. Expression levels of aP2/ FABP4 and PAI-1/SERPINE1 genes were increased by 4- and 1.8-fold, respectively, after short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown (KD) of the USP2 gene, and such expression was alleviated by overexpression of USP2-69 in human myeloid cell lines. Supernatants derived from USP2-KD cells induced IL6 (6-fold) and SAA3 (15-fold) in 3T3-L1 adipocytes to suggest the anti-inflammatory properties of USP2. In addition, we observed a 30% decrease in the number of macrophages in mesenteric adipose tissue derived from USP2-69 transgenic mice fed a high-fat diet for 14 wk compared with that in their C57BL/6 littermates (P<0.01), which was consistent with a 40% decrease in transcription of aP2 and PAI-1. The aP2 locus exhibited elevated chromatin accessibility (>2.1-fold), methylation of histone H3 lysine 4 (>4.5- fold), and acetylation of histone H4 (>2.5-fold) in USP2-KD cells. Transfection of isopeptidase-mutated USP2-69 did not alter chromatin conformation on the aP2 locus in USP2-KD cells. Our results suggest that USP2-69 suppresses meta-inflammatory molecules involved in the development of type-2 diabetes.-Kitamura, H., Kimura, S., Shimamoto, Y., Okabe, J., Ito, M., Miyamoto, T., Naoe, Y., Kikuguchi, C., Meek, B., Toda, C., Okamoto, S., Kanehira, K., Hase, K., Watarai, H., Ishizuka, M., El-Osta, A., Ohara, O., Miyoshi, I. Ubiquitin-specific protease 2-69 in macrophages potentially modulates metainflammation. © FASEB.


Okita K.,Chiba University | Okita K.,Yamaguchi University | Motohashi S.,Chiba University | Shinnakasu R.,Chiba University | And 12 more authors.
International Journal of Psychoanalysis | Year: 2010

Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells possess potent antitumor effects after activation with a specific glycolipid antigen, α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer). A phase I-II clinical study of αGalCer-pulsed dendritic cells (DC) to activate endogenous iNKT cells was previously performed in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In this clinical trial, the patients with increased interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production (>two-fold) in PBMC after the DC treatment (good responder group) experienced a prolonged overall survival time in comparison with the poor responder group. We extended the previous study and performed a microarray-based gene expression analysis using peripheral blood CD56+ cells and CD56-CD3+ T cells from patients enrolled in the above-mentioned clinical study. We sought to identify any biomarkers associated with the immune responses in this immunotherapy trial. Six patient samples corresponding to three subjects in the good responder group and three subjects in the poor responder group were included in the microarray analysis. Genes differentially expressed between pre-treatment and post-treatment samples were selected for analysis. Subsequently, genes that were only expressed in the good responder group or poor responder group were chosen. After these procedures, four selected genes were quantified by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction in another eight patient samples, and two genes, LTB4DH and DPYSL3, were confirmed to be candidate genes for the predictor of a good immune response. The expression profile of these two genes may be associated with the responsiveness of IFN-γ production after αGalCer-pulsed DC treatment. (Cancer Sci 2010; 101: 2333-2340) © 2010 Japanese Cancer Association.

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