Laboratory for Clinical Chemistry and Hematology

Breda, Netherlands

Laboratory for Clinical Chemistry and Hematology

Breda, Netherlands
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

van Holten T.C.,Laboratory for Clinical Chemistry and Hematology | Waanders L.F.,Philips | de Groot P.G.,Laboratory for Clinical Chemistry and Hematology | Hoefer I.E.,UMC Utrecht | And 3 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2013

Background:Cardiovascular disease is one of the major causes of death worldwide.Assessing the risk for cardiovascular disease is an important aspect in clinical decision making and setting a therapeutic strategy, and the use of serological biomarkers may improve this. Despite an overwhelming number of studies and meta-analyses on biomarkers and cardiovascular disease, there are no comprehensive studies comparing the relevance of each biomarker. We performed a systematic review of meta-analyses on levels of serological biomarkers for atherothrombosis to compare the relevance of the most commonly studied biomarkers.Methods and Findings:Medline and Embase were screened on search terms that were related to "arterial ischemic events" and "meta-analyses". The meta-analyses were sorted by patient groups without pre-existing cardiovascular disease, with cardiovascular disease and heterogeneous groups concerning general populations, groups with and without cardiovascular disease, or miscellaneous. These were subsequently sorted by end-point for cardiovascular disease or stroke and summarized in tables. We have identified 85 relevant full text articles, with 214 meta-analyses. Markers for primary cardiovascular events include, from high to low result: C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, cholesterol, apolipoprotein B, the apolipoprotein A/apolipoprotein B ratio, high density lipoprotein, and vitamin D. Markers for secondary cardiovascular events include, from high to low result: cardiac troponins I and T, C-reactive protein, serum creatinine, and cystatin C. For primary stroke, fibrinogen and serum uric acid are strong risk markers. Limitations reside in that there is no acknowledged search strategy for prognostic studies or meta-analyses.Conclusions:For primary cardiovascular events, markers with strong predictive potential are mainly associated with lipids. For secondary cardiovascular events, markers are more associated with ischemia. Fibrinogen is a strong predictor for primary stroke. © 2013 van Holten et al.


Uzun S.,Amphia Hospital | Djamin R.S.,Amphia Hospital | Van'T Veer N.E.,Hospital Pharmacy | Ermens A.A.M.,Laboratory for Clinical Chemistry and Hematology | And 3 more authors.
Clinical Pulmonary Medicine | Year: 2014

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the major health problems in the world. Long-term treatment with macrolide antibiotics is a recent development that has been reported to have beneficial effects on exacerbation frequency. These effects are not only attributed to the antimicrobial effect but also to the immune modulatory effect. Six randomized trials and 1 retrospective study have been performed to investigate the efficacy of macrolides in the prevention of acute exacerbations of COPD. Besides the beneficial effects on the occurrence of exacerbations of COPD, this treatment also seems to improve quality of life and is well tolerated. Antimicrobial resistance is one of the future issues to consider before implementing this therapy. Copyright © 2014 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.


Van Den Berg S.A.A.,Laboratory for Clinical Chemistry and Hematology | Verwer P.E.,Amphia Ziekenhuis | Idema R.N.,Laboratory for Clinical Chemistry and Hematology | Van Guldener C.,Amphia Ziekenhuis
BMJ Case Reports | Year: 2014

A 29-year-old patient presented with an appendicular infiltrate, initially treated with intravenous antibiotics, but later requiring percutaneous drainage. Both prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) were prolonged on 3 days of antibiotic treatment and unresponsive to vitamin K or prothrombin complex concentrate. Laboratory investigation ultimately showed reduced factor V activity and factor V antibodies. In contrast to previously described cases of factor V antibodies, PT and aPTT were only mildly prolonged and residual factor V activity was still >20%. Draining of the abscess did not induce signi ficant bleeding. Afterwards, no haemostatic medication was required. The patient was discharged from the hospital without complications. One week after cessation of the antibiotic treatment, PT and aPTT were within normal range again, with a factor V activity level of 36%. In conclusion, we present a patient with transient factor V antibodies, induced by antibiotics, without clinical bleeding tendency. Copyright 2014 BMJ Publishing Group. All rights reserved.


Uzun S.,Amphia Ziekenhuis | Djamin R.S.,Amphia Ziekenhuis | Kluytmans J.,Amphia Ziekenhuis | Van't Veer N.E.,Hospital Pharmacy | And 6 more authors.
Trials | Year: 2012

Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterised by progressive development of airflow limitation that is poorly reversible. Because of a poor understanding of COPD pathogenesis, treatment is mostly symptomatic and new therapeutic strategies are limited. There is a direct relationship between the severity of the disease and the intensity of the inflammatory response. Besides smoking, one of the hypotheses for the persistent airway inflammation is the presence of recurrent infections. Macrolide antibiotics have bacteriostatic as well as anti-inflammatory properties in patients with cystic fibrosis and other inflammatory pulmonary diseases. There is consistent evidence that macrolide therapy reduces infectious exacerbations, decreases the requirement for additional antibiotics and improves nutritional measures. Because of these positive effects we hypothesised that maintenance macrolide therapy may also have beneficial effects in patients with COPD who have recurrent exacerbations. The effects on development of bacterial resistance to macrolides due to this long-term treatment are unknown. Until now, studies investigating macrolide therapy in COPD are limited. The objective of this study is to assess whether maintenance treatment with macrolide antibiotics in COPD patients with three or more exacerbations in the previous year decreases the exacerbation rate in the year of treatment and to establish microbial resistance due to the long-term treatment.Methods/design: The study is set up as a prospective randomised double-blind placebo-controlled single-centre trial. A total of 92 patients with COPD who have had at least three exacerbations of COPD in the previous year will be included. Subjects will be randomised to receive either azithromycin 500 mg three times a week or placebo. Our primary endpoint is the reduction in the number of exacerbations of COPD in the year of treatment.Discussion: We investigate whether long-term therapy with macrolide antibiotics can prevent exacerbations in patients with COPD. Additionally, our study aims to assess the effect of long-term use of macrolide on the development of antimicrobial resistance and on inflammatory parameters related to COPD. We believe this study will provide more data on the effects of macrolide treatment in patients in COPD and will add more knowledge on its working mechanisms.Trial registration: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT00985244. © 2012 Uzun et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


PubMed | Amphia Ziekenhuis and Laboratory for Clinical Chemistry and Hematology
Type: | Journal: BMJ case reports | Year: 2014

A 29-year-old patient presented with an appendicular infiltrate, initially treated with intravenous antibiotics, but later requiring percutaneous drainage. Both prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) were prolonged on 3days of antibiotic treatment and unresponsive to vitamin K or prothrombin complex concentrate. Laboratory investigation ultimately showed reduced factor V activity and factor V antibodies. In contrast to previously described cases of factor V antibodies, PT and aPTT were only mildly prolonged and residual factor V activity was still >20%. Draining of the abscess did not induce significant bleeding. Afterwards, no haemostatic medication was required. The patient was discharged from the hospital without complications. One week after cessation of the antibiotic treatment, PT and aPTT were within normal range again, with a factor V activity level of 36%. In conclusion, we present a patient with transient factor V antibodies, induced by antibiotics, without clinical bleeding tendency.

Loading Laboratory for Clinical Chemistry and Hematology collaborators
Loading Laboratory for Clinical Chemistry and Hematology collaborators