Laboratory Animal Eco Physiology

Sidi Bou Saïd, Tunisia

Laboratory Animal Eco Physiology

Sidi Bou Saïd, Tunisia
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Samout N.,University of Sfax | Samout N.,Laboratory Animal Eco physiology | Ettaya A.,University of Sfax | Ettaya A.,Laboratory Animal Eco physiology | And 6 more authors.
Biomedicine and Pharmacotherapy | Year: 2016

Obesity is a one of the main global public health problems associated with chronic diseases such as coronary heart disease, diabetes and cancer. As a solution to obesity, we suggest Plantago albicans, which is a medicinal plant with several biological effects. This study assesses the possible anti-obesity protective properties of Plantago albicans in high fat diet-fed rats. 28 male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups; a group which received normal diet (C), the second group was fed HDF diet (HDF), the third group was given normal diet supplemented with Plantago albicans (P.AL), and the fourth group received HDF supplemented with Plantago albicans (HDF + P.AL) (30 mg/kg/day) for 7 weeks. Our results showed an increase in body weight of HDF rats by ∼16% as compared to the control group with an increase in the levels of total cholesterol (TC) as well as LDL-cholesterol, triglycerides (TG) in serum. Also, the concentration of TBARS increased in the liver and heart of HDF-fed rats as compared to the control group. The oral gavage of Plantago albicans extract to obese rats induced a reduction in their body weight, lipid accumulation in liver and heart tissue, compared to the high-fat diet control rats. The obtained results proved that the antioxidant potency of Plantago albicans extracts was correlated with their phenolic and flavonoid contents. The antioxidant capacity of the extract was evaluated by DPPH test (as EC50 = 250 ± 2.12 μg/mL) and FRAP tests (as EC50 = 27.77 ± 0.14 μg/mL). These results confirm the phytochemical and antioxidant impact of Plantago albicans extracts. Plantago albicans content was determined using validated HPLC methodology. © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS


Samout N.,University of Sfax | Samout N.,Laboratory Animal Eco Physiology | Bouzenna H.,University of Sfax | Bouzenna H.,Laboratory Animal Eco Physiology | And 6 more authors.
Biomedicine and Pharmacotherapy | Year: 2016

Obesity is the most common nutritional disorder and is associated with significant comorbidities such as dyslipidemia, atherosclerosis and type 2 diabetes. This pathology is changing worldwide and is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. This study, carried out on adult male Wistar rats, evaluates the inhibitory effects of supplementation with apple pectin molecule on obesity. Under our experimental conditions, administration of pectin molecule decreased 1) the total cholesterol (TC), LDL-cholesterol (LDL-ch) and triglycerides (TG) levels as well as ASAT, ALAT, LDH, ALP, UREA and uric acid (UC) levels in blood serum; and 2) increased the creatinine levels (CREA), compared to HFD group. TBARS concentrations decreased in liver, kidney, and serum by 20%, 29% and 19%, respectively, in a group treated with high-fat diet and pectin (HFD + Pec) compared to a HFD-treated group. The same treatment with pectin molecule increased superoxide dismutase, glutathion peroxidase and catalase activities by 39%, 14% and 16% in liver; 5%, 7% and 31% in kidney; and 9%, 32% and 22% in blood serum in the HFD Pec-treated group. The anti-obesity effects of the pectin molecule in several organs are mainly due to the interaction of this molecule with both the polysaccharide and the enzyme system which can be determined by phytochemical analysis. © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS


Rjeibi I.,Research unit of Macromolecular Biochemistry and Genetic | Rjeibi I.,Laboratory Animal Eco Physiology | Ben Saad A.,Research unit of Macromolecular Biochemistry and Genetic | Hfaiedh N.,Laboratory Animal Eco Physiology | Hfaiedh N.,University of Sfax
Biomedicine and Pharmacotherapy | Year: 2016

Objective The liver plays a major role in detoxification and metabolism of toxic compound and xenobiotics like pesticides. Thereby, any type of modification in its function causes hepatotoxicity. So, the aim of this study was designed to assess the antioxidant and hepatoprotective effects of methanol extract Amaranthus spinosus seed (ASS) on liver injury induced by deltamethrin (DLM), a synthetic pyrethroid pesticide. Materials and methods ASS was subjected to different phytochemical analyses including total phenolic and flavonoid content. In vitro, antioxidant activities was determined using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and hydrogen peroxide scavenging assays. In vivo hepatoprotective effect of A. spinosus seeds against DLM induced liver injury in rats was tested in plasma and liver tissue. Results ASS reverses hepatotoxicity in DLM-intoxicated rats: serum liver biomarkers (alkaline phosphatase, lactate dehydrogenase and aminotransferases), hepatic levels of lipid peroxidation (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), reduced glutathione (GSH) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were restored to normal levels. The protective effects of ASS was confirmed by histological studies. Conclusion The hepatoprotective potential of ASS could be explained by its high phenolic content, antioxidant properties and phytochemical contents. © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS


Bouzenna H.,University of Western Brittany | Bouzenna H.,University of Sfax | Bouzenna H.,Laboratory Animal Eco Physiology | Hfaiedh N.,University of Sfax | And 5 more authors.
Archives of Physiology and Biochemistry | Year: 2017

Context: Essential oils from Pinus species have been reported to have various therapeutic properties. Objective: This study was undertaken to identify the chemical composition and cytoprotective effects of the essential oil of Pinus halepensis L. against aspirin-induced damage in cells in vitro. Material and methods: The cytoprotection of the oil against toxicity of aspirin on the small intestine epithelial cells IEC-6 was tested. Results: The obtained results have shown that 35 different compounds were identified. Aspirin induced a decrease in cell viability, and exhibited significant damage to their morphology and an increase in superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities. However, the co-treatment of aspirin with the essential oil of Pinus induced a significant increase in cell viability and a decrease in SOD and CAT activities. Conclusion: Overall, these finding suggest that the essential oil of Pinus halepensis L. has potent cytoprotective effect against aspirin-induced toxicity in IEC-6 cells. © 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group


Bouzenna H.,University of Sfax | Bouzenna H.,Laboratory Animal Eco Physiology | Bouzenna H.,University of Western Brittany | Dhibi S.,University of Sfax | And 9 more authors.
Biomedicine and Pharmacotherapy | Year: 2016

Citrus limon is a member of the large Rutaceae family characterized by its therapeutic proprieties and has been widely used in traditional medicine to treat various diseases. This study investigates the protective effect of Citrus limon essential oil against a high dose of aspirin-induced acute liver and kidney damage in female Wistar albino rats. Twenty-eight adult female Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups of 7 each: (1) a control group; (2) a group of rats which was kept untreated for 56 days then treated with aspirin (A) (600 mg/kg) for 4 days; (3) a group fed with essential oil of Citrus limon for 56 days then (A) for 4 days; and (4) a group of rats receiving essential oil of Citrus limon for 56 days, then given NaCl for 4 days. Estimations of biochemical parameters in blood were determined. Lipid peroxidation levels (TBARS), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidas (GPx) activities in liver and kidney was determined. A histopathological study was done. Under our experimental conditions, aspirin induced an increase of serum biochemical parameters and it resulted in an oxidative stress in both liver and kidney. This was evidenced by significant increase in TBARS in liver and kidney by 108% and 55%, respectively, compared to control. On the other hand, a decrease in the activities of SOD by 78% and 53%, CAT by 53% and 78%, and GPx by 78% and 51% in liver and kidney, respectively. Administration of EOC to rats attenuated the induced an effect of the high dose of aspirin induced in the afore mentioned serum biochemical parameters. In conclusion, our data suggest that treatment with essential oil of Citrus limon prevented the liver and kidney damage induced by aspirin. © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS


Bouzenna H.,University of Sfax | Bouzenna H.,Laboratory Animal Eco Physiology | Bouzenna H.,University of Western Brittany | Samout N.,University of Sfax | And 11 more authors.
Journal of Oleo Science | Year: 2016

Aromatic and medicinal plants are sources of natural antioxidants thanks to their secondary metabolites. Administration of Pinus halepensis L. (Pinaceae family) in previous studies was found to alleviate deleterious effects of aspirin-induced damage on liver and kidney. The present study, carried out on female rats, evaluates the effects of P. halepensis L. essential oil (EOP) on aspirin (A)-induced damage to liver and kidney. The animals used in this study were rats (n=28) divided into 4 groups of 7 each: (1) a control group (C); (2) a group given NaCl for 56 days then treated with (A) (600 mg/kg) for 4 days (A); (3) a group fed with (EOP) for 56 days then (A) for 4 days; and a group fed with only (EOP) for 56 days and given NaCl for 4 days. Estimations of biochemical parameters in blood were determined using kit methods (Spinreact). Lipid peroxidation levels (TBARS), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities were determined. Histopathological study was done by immersing pieces of both organs in a fixative solution followed by paraffin embeddeding and hematoxylin-eosin staining. Under our experimental conditions, Aspirin at dose 600 mg/kg body weight induced an increase of serum biochemical parameters as well as an oxidative stress in both organs. An increase occurred in TBARS by 108% and 55%, a decrease in SOD by 78% and 53%, CAT by 53% and 78%, and GPx by 78% and 51% in liver and kidney, respectively, compared to control. Administration of EOP given to rats enabled correction in these parameters. It could be concluded that the treatment with P. halepensis L. essential oil inhibited aspirin-induced liver and kidney damage. © 2016 by Japan Oil Chemists’ Society.


Samout N.,Laboratory of Environmental Physiopathology | Samout N.,Laboratory Animal Eco Physiology | Bouzenna H.,Laboratory of Environmental Physiopathology | Bouzenna H.,Laboratory Animal Eco Physiology | And 5 more authors.
EXCLI Journal | Year: 2015

Dietary cholesterol is known to be one of the main risk factors that accelerate oxidation process leading to hypercholesterolemia and attendant cardiovascular diseases. The purpose of this study, carried out on adult male Wistar rats, was to evaluate the inhibitory effects of supplementation with aqueous of Cleome arabica leaf extract on hypercholesterolemia. After 3 months of treatment, animals were sacrificed by decapitation. Blood serum was obtained by centrifugation. Under our experimental conditions, administration of Cleome arabica leaf extract decreased the total cholesterol (TC), LDL-cholesterol (LDL-chol) and triglycerides (TG) levels by 27 %, 52 %, 37 %, respectively, and reduced SGOT, SGPT, LDH and PAL levels in blood serum compared to untreated hypercholesterolemic rats. TBARS concentrations decreased by 21 % in liver, 22 % in heart and 30 % in kidney in a group of rats treated with cholesterol and Cleome arabica (Chol C.ar) compared to a Chol-treated group. The same treatment with Cleome arabica leaf extract increased superoxide dismutase and enhanced glutathione peroxidase activity. Catalase activity was found to increase in liver, heart and kidney by 17 %, 16 % and 23 %, respectively, in the C.ar Chol-treated group. The protective effect of Cleome arabica on hypercholesterolemia inducing oxidative stress in several organs was mainly attributed to antioxidant properties. The latter were due to the presence of phenolic acids and flavonoids shown by the obtained HPLC profiles. © 2015, Leibniz Research Centre for Working Environment and Human Factors. All rights reserved.

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