Laboratory Affiliated with a CHA BIO F and C

Seoul, South Korea

Laboratory Affiliated with a CHA BIO F and C

Seoul, South Korea
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Yoo J.-K.,Laboratory Affiliated with a CHA BIO F and C | Lee J.-H.,Laboratory Affiliated with a CHA BIO F and C | Cho H.-Y.,Laboratory Affiliated with a CHA BIO F and C | Kim J.-G.,Laboratory Affiliated with a CHA BIO F and C
Journal of the Korean Society of Food Science and Nutrition | Year: 2013

This study was performed to assess the antioxidant activities and whitening effects of protopectinase enzymes and mechanical maceration from soybeans on melanin synthesis. The whitening effects of enzyme treatment and mechanical maceration were examined by an in vitro mushroom tyrosinase assay and by assessing markers in B16BL6 melanoma cells. We assessed inhibitory effects on the expression of melanogenic enzymes, including tyrosinase, tyrosinase-related protein 1 (TRP-1), and tyrosinase-related protein 2 (TRP-2) in B16BL6 cells. Inhibitory effects on free radical generation were determined by measuring DPPH and hydroxyl radical scavenging activities. In DPPH radical scavenging activity, enzyme treatment and mechanical maceration had a potent anti-oxidant activity in a dose-dependent manner and significantly inhibited tyrosinase activity in vitro and in B16BL6 melanoma cells. There was also an inhibition in the expression of tyrosinase, TRP-1, and TRP-2 in B16BL6 melanoma cells. Our results show that soybean protopectinase treatment inhibits melanogenesis, with the underlying mechanism possibly due to the inhibition of tyrosinase activity and tyrosinase, TRP-1, and TRP-2 expression. We suggest that soybean protopectinase should be contained as natural active ingredients for antioxidant and whitening cosmetics.


Yoo J.-K.,Laboratory Affiliated with a CHA BIO F and C | Lee J.-H.,Laboratory Affiliated with a CHA BIO F and C | Cho H.-Y.,Laboratory Affiliated with a CHA BIO F and C | Kim J.-G.,Laboratory Affiliated with a CHA BIO F and C
Journal of the Korean Society of Food Science and Nutrition | Year: 2013

The purpose of this research is to minimize the loss of nutrients in carrots (Daucus carota var. sativa). A protopectinase was used to enzymatically macerated and separate cells without damage. The enzyme modification group's collection rate was 81% (residue rate 19%), while the grinding process group's collection rate was 56% (residue rate 44%)-an over 20% of collection rate difference. Thus we predicted a big difference in transference number after the process and wastage. In comparing ingredient changes in the enzyme modification group versus the grinding process group, the content of β-carotene (the carrot's main ingredient) showed a change in pro-tection factor (PF) (2.2±0.2 PF, 1.4±0.4 PF, respectively), total polyphenol content (89±3.42 μg/g, 64±4.16 μg/g, respectively), and total flavonoid content (68±2.73 μg/g, 41±3.26 μg/g, respectively). Thus we confirmed that nutrient destruction, due to cell membrane preservation, occurred less often in the enzyme modification process than the mechanical grinding process group. We also measured DPPH radical scavenging activity, hy-droxyl radical scavenging activity, and nitrite scavenging activity. DPPH radical scavenging activity was 87±0.29% and 74±1.56% in the enzymatic modification group compared to the mechanical grinding process group, respectively. Hydroxyl radical scavenging activity was 44±0.49% and 32±0.48% in the enzymatic mod-ification group compared to the mechanical grinding process group, respectively. Nitrite scavenging activity was 59±0.53% and 46±0.62% in the enzymatic modification group compared to the mechanical grinding process group, respectively. Our results show that cell membrane preservation, via the protopectinase enzyme process, decreases the loss of nutrients and still preserves inherent antioxidants.

Loading Laboratory Affiliated with a CHA BIO F and C collaborators
Loading Laboratory Affiliated with a CHA BIO F and C collaborators