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Arcia P.L.,Institute Agroquimica Y Tecnologia Of Alimentos Csic | Arcia P.L.,Laboratorio Tecnologico del Uruguay | Navarro S.,Institute Agroquimica Y Tecnologia Of Alimentos Csic | Costell E.,Institute Agroquimica Y Tecnologia Of Alimentos Csic | Tarrega A.,Institute Agroquimica Y Tecnologia Of Alimentos Csic
Food Biophysics | Year: 2011

Long-chain inulin in the presence of water forms a particulate gel of inulin crystals that can not only improve the consistency of low-fat products, but can also be responsible for a rough sensation. The objective of this work was to study the rheological properties and microstructure of inulin-enriched desserts when using seeding to control inulin particle size. Dairy desserts were prepared with 2.5%, 5% and 7.5% of long-chain inulin, and during cooling, they were seeded with a small amount of powdered inulin. After 1, 4 and 7 days of refrigerated storage, the rheological properties and microstructure of samples were studied and compared with control (unseeded) samples. Results indicated that seeding had a significant effect on both rheological properties and microstructure of desserts. For all inulin concentrations, the seeding technique favoured a faster formation of a greater amount and more regular sized inulin particles. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. Source


Blanca Gomez G.,Laboratorio Tecnologico del Uruguay | Blanca Gomez G.,Canadian Grain Commission | Blanca Gomez G.,University of Manitoba | Edney M.J.,Canadian Grain Commission | Edney M.J.,University of Manitoba
Journal of the American Society of Brewing Chemists | Year: 2011

Brewery fermentations require sufficient yeast growth during fermentation to achieve the timelines and beer quality expected. It is only possible to obtain the necessary growth when yeast are provided with an adequate supply of all nutrients, including amino acids, minerals, and fermentable sugars. However, a broth made from 100% high-maltose syrup (HMS), and thus containing no micronutrients, showed excellent fermentability under standard laboratory conditions (Congress wort specific gravity, high pitching rates, and continuous stirring), indicating no requirement for micronu-trients under these conditions. The aim of this study was to develop a lab-scale fermentation test, based on reduced pitching rates and use of adjunct sugars, that would indicate the need for micronutrients during fermentation. Malts from three barley varieties and of varying quality were used to investigate the effectiveness of the test. Amino acid levels in worts and fermented worts were measured using ultra-performance liquid chromatog-raphy. Effects of amino acids on fermentability were most apparent when a pitching rate of 0.45 g of compressed yeast per 100 mL of broth and a broth with a 40:60 ratio of HMS to Congress wort were used. At least 1,000 mg of amino acids per L was necessary to completely ferment an 8.5°P broth. Individual amino acids were absorbed in the order expected, with the exception of glutamine, a type A amino acid, which was absorbed at a slower rate than the type B amino acids histidine and methionine. The broth method also found that proline was absorbed even under standard fermentation conditions once other amino acids had been depleted. Source


Arcia P.L.,CSIC - Institute of Agricultural Chemistry and Food Technology | Arcia P.L.,Laboratorio Tecnologico del Uruguay | Costell E.,CSIC - Institute of Agricultural Chemistry and Food Technology | Tarrega A.,CSIC - Institute of Agricultural Chemistry and Food Technology
Journal of Dairy Science | Year: 2011

The purpose of this work was to optimize the formulation of a prebiotic dairy dessert with low fat content (<0.1. g/100. g) using a mixture of short- and long-chain inulin. Response surface methodology was applied to obtain the experimental design and data analysis. Nineteen formulations of dairy dessert were prepared, varying inulin concentration (3 to 9. g/100. g), sucrose concentration (4 to 16. g/100. g), and lemon flavor concentration (25 to 225. mg/kg). Sample acceptability evaluated by 100 consumers varied mainly in terms of inulin and sucrose concentrations and, to a lesser extent, of lemon flavor content. An interaction effect among inulin and sucrose concentration was also found. According to the model obtained, the formulation with 5.5. g/100. g inulin, 10. g/100. g sucrose and 60. mg/kg of lemon flavor was selected. Finally, this sample was compared sensorially with the regular fat content (2.8. g/100. g) sample previously optimized in terms of lemon flavor (146. mg/kg) and sucrose (11.4. g/100. g). No significant difference in acceptability was found between them but the low-fat sample with inulin possessed stronger lemon flavor and greater thickness and creaminess. © 2011 American Dairy Science Association. Source


Arcia P.L.,CSIC - Institute of Agricultural Chemistry and Food Technology | Arcia P.L.,Laboratorio Tecnologico del Uruguay | Navarro S.,CSIC - Institute of Agricultural Chemistry and Food Technology | Costell E.,CSIC - Institute of Agricultural Chemistry and Food Technology | Tarrega A.,CSIC - Institute of Agricultural Chemistry and Food Technology
Food Biophysics | Year: 2011

Long-chain inulin in the presence of water forms a particulate gel of inulin crystals that can not only improve the consistency of low-fat products, but can also be responsible for a rough sensation. The objective of this work was to study the rheological properties and microstructure of inulin-enriched desserts when using seeding to control inulin particle size. Dairy desserts were prepared with 2. 5%, 5% and 7. 5% of long-chain inulin, and during cooling, they were seeded with a small amount of powdered inulin. After 1, 4 and 7 days of refrigerated storage, the rheological properties and microstructure of samples were studied and compared with control (unseeded) samples. Results indicated that seeding had a significant effect on both rheological properties and microstructure of desserts. For all inulin concentrations, the seeding technique favoured a faster formation of a greater amount and more regular sized inulin particles. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. Source


Arcia P.L.,CSIC - Institute of Agricultural Chemistry and Food Technology | Arcia P.L.,Laboratorio Tecnologico del Uruguay | Costell E.,CSIC - Institute of Agricultural Chemistry and Food Technology | Tarrega A.,CSIC - Institute of Agricultural Chemistry and Food Technology
Food Research International | Year: 2010

In food product development it is important to know to what extent changes in formulation modifies the product, affecting its sensory properties and acceptability. Addition of polysaccharides like inulin can affect product structure in particular, modifying both rheological behaviour and perceived texture. The aim of this work was to assess to what extent rheological properties can explain the acceptability of thickness perceived by consumers in starch-based desserts. Low-fat dairy desserts were prepared varying the concentration of sucrose, flavor aroma and the fat replacer with prebiotic properties (inulin) but with fixed amounts of skimmed milk and starch. The rheological behavior was characterized and the level of sample thickness suitability was evaluated by a total of 100 consumers using a 5-point JAR scale (1 = too weak, 3 = just about right; 5 = too strong). Results indicated that flow and viscoelastic parameters varied among samples depending on inulin and sucrose concentration. According to sensory results, thickness suitability varied greatly between samples. The relationships between instrumental and sensory results are studied and discussed. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. Source

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