Laboratorio Superfici e Interfasi SUPERLAB

Catania, Italy

Laboratorio Superfici e Interfasi SUPERLAB

Catania, Italy

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Scandurra A.,Laboratorio Superfici e Interfasi SUPERLAB | Scandurra A.,Laboratorio Plast ICs | Indelli G.F.,Laboratorio Superfici e Interfasi SUPERLAB | Indelli G.F.,Laboratorio Plast ICs | And 2 more authors.
Surface and Interface Analysis | Year: 2012

Patterned thin film electrodes of platinum and silver have been obtained by printing techniques onto sodium perfluorosulphonate membranes to prepare ionic polymer-metal composite actuators. Metal adhesion has been improved by oxygen plasma activation of perfluorosulphonate. Plasma treatment produces oxygen-containing functional groups at surfaces. Platinum-patterned electrodes have been obtained by two methods: (i) ink-jet printing solution of [Pt(NH 3) 4] ++ 2Cl - followed by chemical reduction and (ii) carbon black complementary mask printing followed by platinum complex adsorption and reduction. Silver-patterned electrodes have been obtained by ink-jet printing of silver-based nanoparticles ink sintered at 150 °C, ambient pressure for 1 h. The typical surface resistivity values of patterned electrodes are 5 ω sq -1 for platinum and 0.5-1 ω sq -1 for sintered silver, respectively. Perfluorosulphonate with platinum- and silver-patterned electrodes shows electrical stimuli responsivity. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


Scandurra A.,Laboratorio Superfici e Interfasi SUPERLAB | Scandurra A.,Laboratorio Plast ICs | Indelli G.F.,Laboratorio Superfici e Interfasi SUPERLAB | Indelli G.F.,Laboratorio Plast ICs | And 9 more authors.
Surface and Interface Analysis | Year: 2010

Silver metal patterns onto plastic substrates have been obtained by inkjet printing with commercial ink based on silver nanoscale particles. Morphological characterization by scanning electron microscopy of spin-coating processed films indicates that a sintering treatment at 250° C for 30 min is enough to sinterize the silver metal nanoparticles. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy characterization of sintered metal films shows that the sinterization is accompanied by a reduction of carbon surface concentration coming from carbon-containing chemical compounds present in the ink formulation. After sintering at 250° C for 30 min, the material shows typical electrical resistivity of 4.6 × 10-6 Ωcm (i.e. about three times the value of bulk silver). Printed test structures show typical resistivity after sintering at 250° C for 30 min in the range of 5-7 × 10-6 Ωcm. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


Libertino S.,CNR Institute for Microelectronics and Microsystems | Conoci S.,STMicroelectronics | Scandurra A.,Laboratorio Superfici e Interfasi SUPERLAB | Spinella C.,CNR Institute for Microelectronics and Microsystems
Sensors and Actuators, B: Chemical | Year: 2013

Feasibility studies and examples of integration of Si-based miniaturized biosensors are discussed. We investigated three main issues: (i) device surface functionalization, (ii) biological molecule functionality after immobilization and (iii) biosensor working principle using electrical transduction mechanism in order to fabricate electrolyte-insulator-semiconductor (EIS) and, in the near future, ion-sensitive field-effect transistor (ISFET) biosensors. We compared a well established method for the immobilization of bio-molecules on Si oxide with a new immobilization protocol, both providing a covalent bonding on SiO 2 surfaces of proteins (metallothioneines) enzymes (glucose oxidase, horse radish peroxidase), or DNA strands. The process steps were characterized by means of contact angle, XPS and TEM measurements. The compatibility with Ultra Large Scale Integration (ULSI) technology of the two protocols was also studied. The results strongly encourage to use the new optimized protocol to accomplish both ULSI compatibility and biological molecules correct functionalization. The electrical characterization of MOS-like capacitors with ssDNA anchored on the SiO2 dielectric, allowed us to conclude that the structures tested are sensitive to DNA immobilization and hybridization, as demonstrated by a positive shift in the VFB of +0.47 ± 0.04 V after ssDNA immobilization and by a further +0.07 ± 0.02 V shift when hybridization occurs. Device working principle was proved in this way. However, our results seem to indicate that bare SiO2 surfaces cannot be used as anchoring sites for DNA in transistor applications. In fact, the immersion in solution causes the migration of H+ ions in the oxide and the formation of defects at the SiO2/Si interface. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


PubMed | CNR Institute for Microelectronics and Microsystems, University of Catania and Laboratorio Superfici e Interfasi SUPERLAB
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Sensors (Basel, Switzerland) | Year: 2016

Silicon dioxide surfaces, both bulk and porous, were used to anchor the enzyme glucose oxidase. The immobilization protocol was optimized and the samples characterized using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, Energy Dispersive X-rays coupled to scanning electron microscopy and enzymatic activity measurements. We show that a uniform layer was obtained by activating the oxide before immobilization. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy measurements carried out on bulk oxide showed that the silicon substrate signal was fully screened after the enzyme deposition showing the absence of uncovered surface regions. The enzyme presence was detected monitoring both the C 1s and N 1s signals. Finally, enzymatic activity measurements confirmed that the glucose oxidase activity was preserved after immobilization and maintained after three months of shelf life if the sample was properly stored. The importance of using porous silicon oxide to maximize the surface area was also evidenced.

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