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Bettini A.,Laboratorio Subterraneo Of Canfranc | Bettini A.,University of Padua
European Physical Journal Plus | Year: 2012

The Canfranc Underground Laboratory, presently the second largest in Europe, is located under the Mount Tobazo in the central Spanish Pyrenees, in the province of Huesca in Aragón. After recalling a few historical elements, I shall describe the LSC infrastructures and services both underground and the support ones on the surface. I shall then report the characterisation measurements done so far. A summary of the approved experiments and projects for the future will complete the article. © 2012, Società Italiana di Fisica and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Source


Bettini A.,University of Padua | Bettini A.,Laboratorio Subterraneo Of Canfranc
European Physical Journal Plus | Year: 2012

This paper is an introduction to a series of coordinated articles of an EPJ Plus Focus Point on underground physics laboratories, written by the directors of the larger ones and by the coordinators of the principal new projects. The paper is largely based on the text of my lecture Perspectives of underground physics, given at the Enrico Fermi Varenna International School, Course CLXXXII (2011), Neutrino physics and astrophysics, reproduced here by permission of the Italian Physical Society. Underground laboratories provide the low radioactive background environment necessary to explore the highest energy scales that cannot be reached with accelerators, by searching for extremely rare phenomena. Experiments range from the direct search of the dark-matter particles that constitute the largest fraction of matter in the Universe, to the exploration of the properties of the neutrinos, the most elusive of the known particles and which might be particle and antiparticle at the same time, to the investigation on why our universe contains only matter and almost no antimatter, and much more. © 2012, Società Italiana di Fisica and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Source


Cebrian S.,University of Zaragoza | Cebrian S.,Laboratorio Subterraneo Of Canfranc
AIP Conference Proceedings | Year: 2013

The production of radioactive isotopes in materials due to exposure to cosmic rays can become an hazard for experiments demanding ultra-low background conditions. Generation of long-lived products by cosmic nucleons at sea level has been studied for detector materials like germanium and tellurium and for other materials commonly used like copper; the main results will be summarized, considering both measurements and calculations. The isotope production cross sections and the cosmic ray spectrum are the two main ingredients when calculating this cosmogenic activation; the different alternatives for implementing them will be discussed. But cosmogenic activation can take place also deep underground due to cosmic muons, being relevant in this case the short-lived products. Studies carried out to evaluate the underground activation mainly for liquid scintillator materials will be commented too. © 2013 AIP Publishing LLC. Source


Bettini A.,Laboratorio Subterraneo Of Canfranc | Bettini A.,University of Padua | Bettini A.,National Institute of Nuclear Physics, Italy
Physics of the Dark Universe | Year: 2014

Deep underground laboratories provide the low radioactive background environment necessary to explore the highest energy scales that cannot be reached with accelerators, by searching for extremely rare phenomena. In addition, these laboratories provide unique opportunities to sectors of other fields: geodynamics, rock mechanics, hydrology and the study of life under extreme conditions. Underground laboratories of different size and depth exist in all the regions. This article is focussed on future perspectives, reviewing the newer facilities, those still under project and the space becoming available at the older laboratories. We shall not discuss the existing or proposed facilities dedicated to detectors of long base line experiment with reactor or accelerator beams. © 2014. Source


Amare J.,Laboratorio Subterraneo Of Canfranc | Borjabad S.,Laboratorio Subterraneo Of Canfranc | Cebrian S.,University of Zaragoza | Cuesta C.,Laboratorio Subterraneo Of Canfranc | And 14 more authors.
Optical Materials | Year: 2014

Samples from different materials typically used as optical windows or light guides in scintillation detectors were studied in a very low background environment, at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory, searching for scintillation. A positive result can be confirmed for natural quartz: two distinct scintillation components have been identified, not being excited by an external gamma source. Although similar effect has not been observed neither for synthetic quartz nor for methacrylate, a fast light emission excited by intense gamma flux is evidenced for all the samples in our measurements. These results could affect the use of these materials in low energy applications of scintillation detectors requiring low radioactive background conditions, as they entail a source of background. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Source

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