Laboratorio RAMSES

Bologna, Italy

Laboratorio RAMSES

Bologna, Italy
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Torreggiani E.,University of Ferrara | Lisignoli G.,Instituto Ortopedico Rizzoli | Lisignoli G.,Laboratorio RAMSES | Manferdini C.,Instituto Ortopedico Rizzoli | And 12 more authors.
Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine | Year: 2012

The pathways that control mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiation are not well understood, and although some of the involved transcription factors (TFs) have been characterized, the role of others remains unclear. We used human MSCs from tibial plateau (TP) trabecular bone, iliac crest (IC) bone marrow and Wharton's jelly (WJ) umbilical cord demonstrating a variability in their mineral matrix deposition, and in the expression levels of TFs including Runx2, Sox9, Sox5, Sox6, STAT1 and Slug, all involved in the control of osteochondroprogenitors differentiation program. Because we reasoned that the basal expression level of some TFs with crucial role in the control of MSC fate may be correlated with osteogenic potential, we considered the possibility to affect the hMSCs behaviour by using gene silencing approach without exposing cells to induction media. In this study we found that Slug-silenced cells changed in morphology, decreased in their migration ability, increased Sox9 and Sox5 and decreased Sox6 and STAT1 expression. On the contrary, the effect of Slug depletion on Runx2 was influenced by cell type. Interestingly, we demonstrated a direct in vivo regulatory action of Slug by chromatin immunoprecipitation, showing a specific recruitment of this TF in the promoter of Runx2 and Sox9 genes. As a whole, our findings have important potential implication on bone tissue engineering applications, reinforcing the concept that manipulation of specific TF expression levels may elucidate MSC biology and the molecular mechanisms, which promote osteogenic differentiation. © 2011 The Authors Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine © 2011 Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.


Maumus M.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | Maumus M.,Montpellier University | Manferdini C.,Laboratorio Of Immunoreumatologia E Rigenerazione Tissutale | Manferdini C.,Laboratorio RAMSES | And 15 more authors.
Stem Cell Research | Year: 2013

Our work aimed at evaluating the role of adipose stem cells (ASC) on chondrocytes from osteoarthritic (OA) patients and identifying the mediators involved. We used primary chondrocytes, ASCs from different sources and bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) from OA donors. ASCs or MSCs were co-cultured with chondrocytes in a minimal medium and using cell culture inserts. Under these conditions, ASCs did not affect the proliferation of chondrocytes but significantly decreased camptothecin-induced apoptosis. Both MSCs and ASCs from different sources allowed chondrocytes in the cocultures maintaining a stable expression of markers specific for a mature phenotype, while expression of hypertrophic and fibrotic markers was decreased. A number of factors known to regulate the chondrocyte phenotype (IL-1β, IL-1RA, TNF-α) and matrix remodeling (TIMP-1 and -2, MMP-1 and -9, TSP-1) were not affected. However, a significant decrease of TGF-β1 secretion by chondrocytes and induction of HGF secretion by ASCs was observed. Addition of a neutralizing anti-HGF antibody reversed the anti-fibrotic effect of ASCs whereas hypertrophic markers were not modulated. In summary, ASCs are an interesting source of stem cells for efficiently reducing hypertrophy and dedifferentiation of chondrocytes, at least partly via the secretion of HGF. This supports the interest of using these cells in therapies for osteo-articular diseases. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.


PubMed | Instituto Ortopedico Rizzoli and Laboratorio RAMSES
Type: | Journal: Journal of cellular physiology | Year: 2017

Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are key players in the repair or regeneration of the damaged bone tissue. However, heterogeneity exists between MSCs derived from different donors in their bone formation ability both in vitro and in vivo. The identification of markers defining MSCs with different functional phenotypes is fundamental to maximize their clinical potential. In our previous in vivo study, impaired expression in MSCs of cystathionine--synthase (CBS) and cystathionine--lyase (CSE), the two key enzymes in the catabolic pathway of homocysteine, was associated to decreased bone formation and to the onset of osteoporosis in mice. Here, we investigated whether osteogenic differentiation of human MSCs (hMSCs) modulates the expression of CBS and CSE. The expression of CBS and CSE was also assessed during chondrogenesis to confirm the specificity of their expression during osteogenesis. hMSCs displayed a heterogeneous mineralizing capacity between donors (70% of the samples mineralized, while 30% did not mineralize). Inducible expression of CBS and CSE was found to be associated with a mineralizing phenotype in hMSCs. In particular, up-regulation of CSE was restricted to hMSCs undergoing mineralization. During chondrogenesis, CBS was significantly up-regulated while CSE expression was not affected. Ex-vivo findings confirmed that mature h-osteoblasts (hOBs) show consistently higher expression of CBS and CSE than hMSCs. Our data provide the first evidence that the expression of CBS and CSE in hMSCs closely correlates with the transition of hMSCs towards the osteoblastic phenotype and that CSE may constitute a novel marker of osteogenic differentiation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.


Piva R.,University of Ferrara | Lambertini E.,University of Ferrara | Manferdini C.,Laboratorio Of Immunoreumatologia E Rigenerazione Tissutale | Manferdini C.,Laboratorio RAMSES | And 9 more authors.
Osteoarthritis and Cartilage | Year: 2015

To contribute to clarify molecular mechanisms supporting senescence and de-differentiation of chondrocytes in chondrocyte pathologies such as osteoarthritis (OA). Specifically, we investigated the relationship between the nuclear lamina protein Lamin B1 and the negative regulator of chondrogenesis Slug transcription factor in osteoarthritic chondrocytes. Methods: Lamin B1 and Slug proteins were analyzed in cartilage explants from normal subjects and OA patients by immunohistochemical technique. Their expression was confirmed on isolated chondrocytes both at passage 0 and passage 2 (de-differentiated chondrocytes) by immunofluorescence and western blot. Subsequently, we explored the ". in vivo" binding of Slug on LMNB1 promoter by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay (ChIP). Results: In this study we demonstrated that nuclear lamina protein Lamin B1 and anti-chondrogenic Slug transcription factor are upregulated in cartilage and OA chondrocytes. Furthermore, we found that Slug is ". in vivo" recruited by LMNB1 gene promoter mostly when chondrocytes undergo de-differentiation or OA degeneration. Conclusions: We described for the first time a potential regulatory role of Slug on the LMNB1 gene expression in OA chondrocytes. These findings may have important implications for the study of premature senescence, and degeneration of cartilage, and may contribute to develop effective therapeutic strategies against signals supporting cartilage damage in different subsets of patients. © 2015 Osteoarthritis Research Society International.


PubMed | University of Bologna, University of Ferrara, CNR Institute of Molecular Genetics and Laboratorio RAMSES
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Osteoarthritis and cartilage | Year: 2015

To contribute to clarify molecular mechanisms supporting senescence and de-differentiation of chondrocytes in chondrocyte pathologies such as osteoarthritis (OA). Specifically, we investigated the relationship between the nuclear lamina protein Lamin B1 and the negative regulator of chondrogenesis Slug transcription factor in osteoarthritic chondrocytes.Lamin B1 and Slug proteins were analyzed in cartilage explants from normal subjects and OA patients by immunohistochemical technique. Their expression was confirmed on isolated chondrocytes both at passage 0 and passage 2 (de-differentiated chondrocytes) by immunofluorescence and western blot. Subsequently, we explored the invivo binding of Slug on LMNB1 promoter by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay (ChIP).In this study we demonstrated that nuclear lamina protein Lamin B1 and anti-chondrogenic Slug transcription factor are upregulated in cartilage and OA chondrocytes. Furthermore, we found that Slug is invivo recruited by LMNB1 gene promoter mostly when chondrocytes undergo de-differentiation or OA degeneration.We described for the first time a potential regulatory role of Slug on the LMNB1 gene expression in OA chondrocytes. These findings may have important implications for the study of premature senescence, and degeneration of cartilage, and may contribute to develop effective therapeutic strategies against signals supporting cartilage damage in different subsets of patients.

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