Laboratorio Of Paleontologia Y Geobiologia

Gustavo A. Madero, Mexico

Laboratorio Of Paleontologia Y Geobiologia

Gustavo A. Madero, Mexico

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Woolrich-Pina G.A.,Laboratorio Of Paleontologia Y Geobiologia | Smith G.R.,Denison University | Lemos-Espinal J.A.,Laboratorio Of Ecologia | Ramirez-Silva J.P.,Autonomous University of Nayarit
Phyllomedusa | Year: 2015

Observations on sexual dimorphism, sex ratio, and reproduction for a population of Anolis nebulosus from Nayarit, Mexico, was studied. The study area was located in the Xalisco municipality, Nayarit, which has an average temperature and rainfall of 23.9°C and 1452 mm respectively. The study was conducted in an area of 5625 m2 within a patch of deciduous forest. Snout-vent length (SVL) for each captured lizard was measured along with the head width (HW) at the widest point, head length (HL) from anterior edge of ear to tip of snout, and femur length (FL) from knee to middle of pelvic region to the nearest 0.01 mm using calipers. Male and female Anolis nebulosus were not sexually dimorphic with regard to SVL. It was found that males had relatively longer femurs than females. Fitch found no significant sexual size dimorphism in A. nebulosus pooled across several populations in Mexico, and concluded. Twenty-three of the 32 females observed in the summer were gravid whereas no gravid females were observed in the winter. The smallest gravid female was 34 mm SVL, which was also the smallest female collected overall.


Woolrich-Pina G.A.,Laboratorio Of Paleontologia Y Geobiologia | Woolrich-Pina G.A.,Autonomous University of Nayarit | Lemos-Espinal J.A.,National Autonomous University of Mexico | Smith G.R.,Denison University | And 2 more authors.
Herpetology Notes | Year: 2014

We report on the reproductive cycles of male and female X. rectocollaris from the Tehuacan Valley, Puebla, Mexico. Testis volume peaked in May. The smallest female with enlarged follicles was 69 mm SVL, which is the smallest size at maturity yet observed in Xenosaurus. Maximum follicular volume varied among months, with small peaks in April and July, and a large peak in September. Embryos were largest in July. These cycles are generally similar to those observed in previously studied Xenosaurus.


Woolrich-Pina G.A.,Laboratorio Of Paleontologia Y Geobiologia | Woolrich-Pina G.A.,National Autonomous University of Mexico | Smith G.R.,Denison University | Lemos-Espinal J.A.,National Autonomous University of Mexico
Herpetology Notes | Year: 2012

We report on the temperature relationships of three Mexican species of Phrynosoma (P. braconnieri, P. orbiculare, and P. taurus). Mean body temperature (Tb) was 32.72°C for P. braconnieri, 32.54°C for P. orbiculare, and 33.39°C for P. taurus. In P. braconnieri and P. taurus, Tb was not correlated with air or substrate temperatures, whereas in P. orbiculare Tb was positively correlated with them. Body size did not affect Tb in any of the species. Females had higher Tbs than males in P. orbiculare, males had higher Tbs than females in P. braconnieri, and males and females had similar Tbs in P. taurus. Most of the Phyrnosoma observed in our study were found in sunny microhabitats, although several were found in shaded microhabitats.


Woolrich-Pina G.A.,Laboratorio Of Paleontologia Y Geobiologia | Woolrich-Pina G.A.,National Autonomous University of Mexico | Smith G.R.,Denison University
Herpetologica | Year: 2012

There are currently eight described species in the lizard genus Xenosaurus. However, given their restricted habitat use (primarily limited to crevices or holes in rocks) and the limited ability to disperse among isolated populations, it is likely that more species of Xenosaurus await discovery and description. Herein we describe a new species of Xenosaurus from the Sierra Madre Oriental in the State of Hidalgo, Mexico. This new species differs from previously described species in lacking a neck band and in having two pale lines that angle up from the jaws and extend parasagittally along the neck. © 2012 by The Herpetologists' League, Inc.


Lemos-Espinal J.A.,Laboratorio Of Ecologia Ubipro | Smith G.R.,Denison University | Woolrich-Pina G.A.,Laboratorio Of Paleontologia Y Geobiologia
Current Herpetology | Year: 2015

Ambystoma altamiranoi is an endangered endemic salamander found in the Transvolcanic Belt of Mexico. Unfortunately, relatively little is known about its ecology. Here we report on the diet of larval A. altamiranoi from a population in Llano de los Axolotes, Sierra de las Cruces, State of México, Mexico. Empty stomachs were found in 13.3% of individuals. Ostracods and gastropods dominated the diet of A. altamiranoi, together accounting for 89.9% of prey items consumed. The remainder of the diet consisted primarily of insects. Our observations suggest that the diet of A. altamiranoi is relatively narrow and that resources may be limited (relatively high frequency of empty stomachs), suggesting that factors that could impact the availability of ostracods and gastropods might have serious consequences for these endangered salamanders. © 2015 by The Herpetological Society of Japan


Woolrich-Pina G.A.,Laboratorio Of Paleontologia Y Geobiologia | Smith G.R.,Denison University | Lemos-Espinal J.A.,National Autonomous University of Mexico | Ramirez-Silva J.P.,Autonomous University of Nayarit
Journal of Thermal Biology | Year: 2015

In lizards, the role of gravid oviparous females in controlling the temperature experienced by developing embryos prior to oviposition has been rarely examined. In particular, relatively little is known about the effect of gravidity on the thermal ecology of female Anolis lizards. Here we examine the thermal ecology of Anolis nebulosus from Nayarit, Mexico, with a particular goal of comparing the thermal ecology of gravid females to that of non-gravid females and males. The thermal efficiency (E) of gravid female A. nebulosus (E=0.782) was higher than in males (E=0.464), and to a lesser extent, non-gravid females (E=0.637), despite no significant differences observed in body, air, operative, or set point temperatures among males, gravid females, and non-gravid females. Gravid females had smaller differences between body temperatures and set point temperatures (db), but did not differ in the difference between operative temperature and set point temperature (de). Gravid females used sun-shade and shaded microhabitats proportionately more than males and non-gravid females, and rarely used sunny microhabitats. Our results suggest that gravid A. nebulosus are using a different and more efficient thermoregulatory strategy than other adults in the population. Such efficient thermoregulation is possibly related to females attempting to provide a thermal environment that is conducive to the development of embryos in eggs prior to oviposition. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.


Woolrich-Pina G.A.,Laboratorio Of Paleontologia Y Geobiologia | Woolrich-Pina G.A.,National Autonomous University of Mexico | Smith G.R.,Denison University | Lemos-Espinal J.A.,National Autonomous University of Mexico | And 3 more authors.
Acta Biologica Colombiana | Year: 2012

The distribution and abundance of organisms within a pond or lake can reflect the result of a variety of factors. We examined the abundance of the endemic fish, Poblana alchichica, in Lago de Alchichica, Puebla, Mexico, as well as how the abundance varied among months. Dissolved oxygen, temperature, and salinity varied among months. The abundance of Poblana alchichica peaked in December and February. For the months when fish were observed, their abundances were positively related to dissolved oxygen concentration and were generally not related to temperature. Our results provide evidence that there is substantial seasonal variation in the abundances of Poblana alchichica and that within months, their distributions are likely driven by dissolved oxygen than either temperature or salinity.


PubMed | Autonomous University of Nayarit, National Autonomous University of Mexico, Laboratorio Of Paleontologia Y Geobiologia and Denison University
Type: | Journal: Journal of thermal biology | Year: 2015

In lizards, the role of gravid oviparous females in controlling the temperature experienced by developing embryos prior to oviposition has been rarely examined. In particular, relatively little is known about the effect of gravidity on the thermal ecology of female Anolis lizards. Here we examine the thermal ecology of Anolis nebulosus from Nayarit, Mexico, with a particular goal of comparing the thermal ecology of gravid females to that of non-gravid females and males. The thermal efficiency (E) of gravid female A. nebulosus (E=0.782) was higher than in males (E=0.464), and to a lesser extent, non-gravid females (E=0.637), despite no significant differences observed in body, air, operative, or set point temperatures among males, gravid females, and non-gravid females. Gravid females had smaller differences between body temperatures and set point temperatures (db), but did not differ in the difference between operative temperature and set point temperature (de). Gravid females used sun-shade and shaded microhabitats proportionately more than males and non-gravid females, and rarely used sunny microhabitats. Our results suggest that gravid A. nebulosus are using a different and more efficient thermoregulatory strategy than other adults in the population. Such efficient thermoregulation is possibly related to females attempting to provide a thermal environment that is conducive to the development of embryos in eggs prior to oviposition.

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