Laboratorio Of Paleontologia E Paleoecologia

Torres Vedras, Portugal

Laboratorio Of Paleontologia E Paleoecologia

Torres Vedras, Portugal
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Mocho P.,The Dinosaur Institute | Mocho P.,Laboratorio Of Paleontologia E Paleoecologia | Royo-Torres R.,Fundacion Conjunto Paleontologico de Teruel Dinopolis Museo Aragones de Paleontologia | Malafaia E.,Laboratorio Of Paleontologia E Paleoecologia | And 5 more authors.
Geobios | Year: 2016

The Upper Jurassic of the Lusitanian Basin (Portugal) is particularly rich in sauropod fossil remains, with four established taxa: Dinheirosaurus, Lusotitan, Lourinhasaurus and Zby. The presence of sauropod caudal procoelous vertebrae is reported for the first time in the Upper Jurassic of Portugal, with specimens described from the localities of Baleal, Paimogo, Praia da Areia Branca, Porto das Barcas, and Praia da Corva. The presence of slightly procoelous centra and fan-shaped caudal ribs with smooth prezygapophyseal centrodiapophyseal fossa in the more anterior caudal vertebrae allows for the assignment of these specimens to an indeterminate eusauropod, probably belonging to a non-neosauropod eusauropod form. The absence of several features in the Portuguese specimens that are common in diplodocids, mamenchisaurids and titanosaurs, prevents the establishment of sound relationships with these clades. The described specimens are almost identical to the anterior caudal vertebrae of the Iberian turiasaur Losillasaurus. During the Iberian Late Jurassic, Turiasauria is the only Iberian group of sauropods, which shares this type of morphology with the Baleal, Paimogo, Praia da Areia Branca, Porto das Barcas and Praia da Corva specimens. These specimens represent one of the four anterior caudal vertebral morphotypes recorded in the Upper Jurassic of the Lusitanian Basin and briefly described herein. © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS.


Mocho P.,The Dinosaur Institute | Mocho P.,Spanish University for Distance Education (UNED) | Mocho P.,Laboratorio Of Paleontologia E Paleoecologia | Royo-Torres R.,Fundacion Conjunto Paleontologico de Teruel Dinopolis Museo Aragones de Paleontologia | And 6 more authors.
Geobios | Year: 2017

The Upper Jurassic of the Lusitanian Basin (Portugal) is particularly rich in sauropod fossil remains, with four established taxa: Dinheirosaurus, Lusotitan, Lourinhasaurus and Zby. The presence of sauropod caudal procoelous vertebrae is reported for the first time in the Upper Jurassic of Portugal, with specimens described from the localities of Baleal, Paimogo, Praia da Areia Branca, Porto das Barcas, and Praia da Corva. The presence of slightly procoelous centra and fan-shaped caudal ribs with smooth prezygapophyseal centrodiapophyseal fossa in the more anterior caudal vertebrae allows for the assignment of these specimens to an indeterminate eusauropod, probably belonging to a non-neosauropod eusauropod form. The absence of several features in the Portuguese specimens that are common in diplodocids, mamenchisaurids and titanosaurs, prevents the establishment of sound relationships with these clades. The described specimens are almost identical to the anterior caudal vertebrae of the Iberian turiasaur Losillasaurus. During the Iberian Late Jurassic, Turiasauria is the only Iberian group of sauropods, which shares this type of morphology with the Baleal, Paimogo, Praia da Areia Branca, Porto das Barcas and Praia da Corva specimens. These specimens represent one of the four anterior caudal vertebral morphotypes recorded in the Upper Jurassic of the Lusitanian Basin and briefly described herein. © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS


Malafaia E.,University of Lisbon | Malafaia E.,Laboratorio Of Paleontologia E Paleoecologia | Escaso F.,Laboratorio Of Paleontologia E Paleoecologia | Escaso F.,Spanish University for Distance Education (UNED) | And 8 more authors.
Journal of Iberian Geology | Year: 2017

Purpose: Isolated theropod teeth are abundant in the Upper Jurassic of the Lusitanian Basin and are an important source to reconstruct the diversity of this group as well as its geographic and stratigraphic distribution. However, reliably identification of isolated teeth is complex, especially for those morphotypes related to poorly represented groups. Herein a set of isolated theropod teeth collected in different sites from the Upper Jurassic of the Lusitanian Basin ranging from the late Kimmeridgian to late Tithonian in age are described and discussed. Methods: These teeth were grouped in seventeen distinct morphotypes based first on morphology and comparative anatomy. Multivariate statistical analyses were performed in order to assign each morphotype to a certain taxon. Results: The current analysis shows the presence of several groups of theropods such as Ceratosaurus, Torvosaurus, and Allosaurus beside morphotypes identified as belonging to indeterminate Megalosauroidea and Allosauroidea and morphotypes tentatively assigned to Tyrannosauroidea, Dromaeosauridae, and Richardoestesia. This faunal composition, namely the presence of a non-megalosaurid megalosauroid possibly related to the piatnitzkysaurid Marshosaurus, indicates a higher diversity of theropods in the Late Jurassic of the Lusitanian Basin than previously known, based on more complete specimens. Results obtained from this analysis partially agree with previous studies of other collections with isolated theropod teeth from the Upper Jurassic of Portugal such as those of the Guimarota coal mine. However, the presence of velociraptorine dromaeosaurids, compsognathids, and troodontids reported from this site could not be confirmed in the sample herein analyzed. This analysis also indicates a great similarity of the theropod faunas from the Late Jurassic of the Lusitanian Basin and other European chronocorrelative localities such as those from Spain and Germany. © 2017, Springer International Publishing AG.


Perez-Garcia A.,Laboratorio Of Paleontologia E Paleoecologia | Ortega F.,Laboratorio Of Paleontologia E Paleoecologia | Ortega F.,Spanish University for Distance Education (UNED)
Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology | Year: 2011

A new pleurosternid turtle from the Upper Jurassic of the Central West of Portugal is described. Pleurosternids are abundant in the European and American Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous fossil record. Despite this, at present, there is no reference to any genus of pleurosternids before the upper Tithonian in Europe. Selenemys lusitanica, gen. et sp. nov., represented by several specimens from the upper Kimmeridgian of the Lusitanian Basin (Portugal), constitutes the most ancient generic attribution to a pleurosternid turtle in Europe. A cladistic analysis shows that Selenemys is more closely related to the European Lower Cretaceous pleurosternids than to the Jurassic North American representatives of this group. This is interpreted as a vicariant biogeographical distribution of the group on both sides of the North Atlantic during the Uppermost Jurassic, in contrast to that observed in other groups of reptiles. © 2011 by the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology.


Mocho P.,Autonomous University of Madrid | Mocho P.,Laboratorio Of Paleontologia E Paleoecologia | Royo-Torres R.,Fundacion Conjunto Paleontologico de Teruel Dinopolis | Ortega F.,Laboratorio Of Paleontologia E Paleoecologia | Ortega F.,Spanish University for Distance Education (UNED)
Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society | Year: 2014

Lourinhasaurus alenquerensis is a Portuguese Upper Jurassic dinosaur whose lectotype is one of the most complete sauropod specimens from the Portuguese fossil record and from the Upper Jurassic of Europe. It was recovered from sediments of the Sobral Formation (upper Kimmeridgian to lower Tithonian) at Moinho do Carmo (Alenquer, Portugal). The lectotype of Lourinhasaurus was first related to Apatosaurus and then tentatively related to Camarasaurus. Finally, it was established as a new taxon, Lourinhasaurus, including the Moinho do Carmo specimen. At the time of writing, Lourinhasaurus had a poor diagnosis and an unstable phylogenetic position. Revision of the Moinho do Carmo specimen has led to a detailed description and a new and more complete codification for several morphological characters. The phylogenetic analyses proposed herein considered Lourinhasaurus as a Camarasauromorpha Macronaria. This study also recovered a Camarasauridae clade incorporating Lourinhasaurus, Camarasaurus and, putatively, Tehuelchesaurus and that implies the presence of Camarasauridae in the European Upper Jurassic. Besides the strong similarity to Camarasaurus, Lourinhasaurus alenquerensis is here considered a valid taxon with 13 putative autapomorphies such as a sagittal keel on the dorsal margin of sacral neural spines, circular and deep spinoprezygapophyseal fossa on proximal caudal vertebrae, marked crest and groove bordering the lateral margin of the acetabulum in the ischium, and a marked deflection of the entire femoral shaft without lateral bulge. The apparently high number of taxa among the sauropod fauna from the Iberian Peninsula during the Late Jurassic is similar to the palaeobiodiversity recorded in formations of the same age, i.e. Morrison and Tendaguru, and does not support the hypothesis of a connection between the North America and Iberian Peninsula faunas during the later part of the Late Jurassic reflected by other faunal and floral groups. © 2014 The Linnean Society of London.


Malafaia E.,University of Lisbon | Malafaia E.,Laboratorio Of Paleontologia E Paleoecologia | Ortega F.,Laboratorio Of Paleontologia E Paleoecologia | Ortega F.,Spanish University for Distance Education (UNED) | And 3 more authors.
Historical Biology | Year: 2015

A theropod assigned to Ceratosaurus was previously reported from the Portuguese Lusitanian Basin based on a limited number of elements of a single individual. Here, we describe newly discovered elements that likely pertain to same, earlier described, specimen. The new elements provide additional evidence that the range of Ceratosaurus spanned from what is now North America into Europe. Previously, some differences were noted between the Portuguese specimens and the North American Ceratosaurus. We consider these differences to be trivial and attribute them to individual variation and/or ontogeny. The following set of features (lesser trochanter positioned low on the femur; crista tibiofibularis obliquely oriented with respect to the axis of the femoral shaft; infrapopliteal ridge present posteriorly on the femur; large cnemial crest; and medial condyle of the tibia continuous with proximal end) indicate that the Portuguese specimen is assignable to Ceratosaurus. This record constitutes one of the scarce evidence of basal ceratosaurian theropods in the Late Jurassic of Europe. Despite the abundance, diversity and wide geographical distribution of ceratosaurs during the Late Cretaceous, its early evolutionary history remains poorly understood. The Portuguese specimens constitute an important evidence for the knowledge of the paleobiogeographic evolution of the clade during the Late Jurassic. © 2014, © 2014 Taylor & Francis.


Malafaia E.,University of Lisbon | Malafaia E.,Laboratorio Of Paleontologia E Paleoecologia | Mocho P.,Laboratorio Of Paleontologia E Paleoecologia | Mocho P.,Spanish University for Distance Education (UNED) | And 4 more authors.
Historical Biology | Year: 2016

A new specimen of a theropod dinosaur found in Upper Jurassic sedimentary levels of the Lusitanian Basin (Portugal) is described. The specimen includes axial (cervical, dorsal, and caudal vertebrae and ribs) and pelvic elements, corresponding to a small-sized and juvenile individual. This specimen is one of the most complete theropod dinosaur from the Upper Jurassic of Portugal, and the only evidence of a post-hatchling juvenile theropod individual currently recognized in this record. The phylogenetic analysis recovered the new specimen as a basal Allosauroidea. It presents a combination of characters shared with other allosauroids already known in the Upper Jurassic of the Lusitanian Basin, Allosaurus and Lourinhanosaurus, but also some differences relative to both taxa. Some of these differences may be related to the juvenile condition of the specimen, but other unusual features cannot be properly explained by ontogeny, and are interpreted as having taxonomic significance. This combination of features might justify the description of a new theropod taxon for the Portuguese Upper Jurassic. Nevertheless, the presence of three sympatric and almost synchronic, closely related basal allosauroids requires further exploration of their intra- or interspecific variability. © 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group


Mocho P.,Spanish University for Distance Education (UNED) | Mocho P.,Laboratorio Of Paleontologia E Paleoecologia | Mocho P.,Autonomous University of Madrid | Royo-Torres R.,Fundacion Conjunto Paleontologico de Teruel Dinopolis Museo Aragones de Paleontologia | And 6 more authors.
Historical Biology | Year: 2016

The Upper Jurassic’s central and northern sectors of the Bombarral Sub-basin are relatively poor in sauropod material, highlighting the specimens (mainly teeth) found in the Guimarota mine (Leiria) and the Andrés (Pombal) fossil site. The study of published and the unpublished sauropod material allows for a revision of the present state of sauropod diversity of the Bombarral Sub-basin. These new specimens come from Pombal, Leiria, Batalha, Porto de Mós, Alcobaça and Caldas da Rainha, and include an almost complete posterior or middle dorsal neural spine and a partial caudal series. The systematic re-evaluation of the sauropod record of this sector indicates the presence of turiasaurs, diplodocines, titanosauriforms and an indeterminate eusauropod form. During the last part of the twentieth century, the discovery of fossil vertebrates has increased significantly in the sediments cropping out in the central and northern sectors of the Bombarral Sub-basin (Alcobaça and Bombarral Formations), improving our understanding of the Late Jurassic faunas of the Lusitanian Basin. © 2016 Taylor & Francis


Mocho P.,Autonomous University of Madrid | Mocho P.,Laboratorio Of Paleontologia E Paleoecologia | Mocho P.,Spanish University for Distance Education (UNED) | Royo-Torres R.,Fundacion Conjunto Paleontologico de Teruel Dinopolis Museo Aragones de Paleontologia | And 7 more authors.
Historical Biology | Year: 2016

Turiasauria is a clade of eusauropods with a wide stratigraphic range that could extend from the Bathonian to the lower Aptian including Turiasaurus, Losillasaurus, Zby and putatively, Galveosaurus, Atlasaurus and isolated remains from Middle Jurassic-to-Lower Cretaceous. Some are characterised by the presence of heart-shaped teeth. Several tooth occurrences from the Portuguese Upper Jurassic with this type of morphology (SI: 1.1–1.8) are reported and discussed. If this morphology is regarded as synapomorphic of Turiasauria, the teeth will be tentatively related to this clade. From a sample of 43 teeth, three main morphotypes are described. Three hypotheses might explain the morphological variation: (1) the range of tooth morphologies indicates variation in the jaw, (2) the range of tooth morphologies indicates taxonomic variation or (3) a combination of both. The general wear pattern in morphotypes I and II starts with a distal facet, then the appearance of mesial/apical facet and finally a ‘V’-shaped facet. In morphotype III, the wear begins with a mesial facet. The variability observed for Portuguese Upper Jurassic specimens is congruent with the morphological variability along the tooth row shown by other sauropods with spatulate/spoon-shaped teeth and it is considered the most parsimonious hypothesis to explain it. © 2015 Taylor & Francis.


Mocho P.,Spanish University for Distance Education (UNED) | Mocho P.,Laboratorio Of Paleontologia E Paleoecologia | Royo-Torres R.,Fundacion Conjunto Paleontologico de Teruel Dinopolis Museo Aragones de Paleontologia | Malafaia E.,Laboratorio Of Paleontologia E Paleoecologia | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Iberian Geology | Year: 2016

The Museu Geológico collections house some of the first sauropods found in the Upper Jurassic sediments of the Lusitanian Basin, including the Lourinhasaurus alenquerensis and Lusotitan atalaiensis lectotypes, previously considered as new species of the genera Apatosaurus and Brachiosaurus, respectively. Several fragmentary specimens have historically been referred to those taxa, but for the most part of these systematic attributions are not supported herein, excluding a caudal vertebra from Maceira (MG 8804) considered as cf. Lusotitan atalaiensis. The material housed in the Museu Geológico comprises remains of non-neosauropod eusauropods (including turiasaurs) and neosauropods (indeterminate neosauropods, diplodocids, camarasaurids and basal titanosauriforms). Middle caudal vertebrae with lateral fossae, with ventral hollow bordered by pronounced ventrolateral crests and, which are quadrangular in cross-section, indicate for the presence of diplodocine diplodocids in the northern part of the Lusitanian Basin Central Sector during the Late Jurassic. A humerus collected from Praia dos Frades (MG 4976) is attributed to cf. Duriatitan humerocristatus suggesting the presence of shared sauropod forms between the Portugal and United Kingdom during the Late Jurassic. Duriatitan is an indeterminate member of Eusauropoda and the discovery of new material in both territories is necessary to confirm its systematic position. The studied material is in accordance with the previously recorded sauropod fauna in the Portuguese Late Jurassic, which includes non-neosauropod eusauropods (including turiasaurs), diplodocids and macronarians (including camarasaurids and basal titanosauriforms). © 2016, Universidad Complutense de Madrid. All rights reserved.

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