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Ex-Hacienda el Hospital, Mexico

Viedma-Rodriguez R.,Laboratorio Of Genomica Funcional Y Proteomica | Viedma-Rodriguez R.,National Autonomous University of Mexico | Ruiz Esparza-Garrido R.,Laboratorio Of Genomica Funcional Y Proteomica | Baiza-Gutman L.A.,National Autonomous University of Mexico | And 4 more authors.
Tumor Biology | Year: 2015

Majority of women with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancers initially respond to hormone therapies such as tamoxifen (TAM; antagonist of estrogen). However, many tumors eventually become resistant to TAM. Therefore, understanding the various cellular components involved in causing resistance to TAM is of paramount importance in designing novel entities for efficacious hormone therapy. Previously, we found that suppression of BIK gene expression induced TAM resistance in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. In order to understand the response of these cells to TAM and its association with resistance, a microarray analysis of gene expression was performed in the BIK-suppressed MCF-7 cells and compared it to the TAM-only-treated cells (controls). Several genes participating in various cellular pathways were identified. Molecules identified in the drug resistance pathway were 14-3-3z or YWHAZ, WEE1, PRKACA, NADK, and HSP90AA 1. Further, genes involved in cell cycle control, apoptosis, and cell proliferation were also found differentially expressed in these cells. Transcriptional and translational analysis of key molecules such as STAT2, AKT 3, and 14-3-3z revealed similar changes at the messenger RNA (mRNA) as well as at the protein level. Importantly, there was no cytotoxic effect of TAM on BIK-suppressed MCF-7 cells. Further, these cells were not arrested at the G0-G1 phase of the cell cycle although 30 % of BIK-suppressed cells were arrested at the G2 phase of the cycle on TAM treatment. Furthermore, we found a relevant interaction between 14-3-3z and WEE1, suggesting that the cytotoxic effect of TAM was prevented in BIK-suppressed cells because this interaction leads to transitory arrest in the G2 phase leading to the repair of damaged DNA and allowing the cells to proliferate. © 2015, International Society of Oncology and BioMarkers (ISOBM). Source


Balderrabano-Saucedo N.A.,Hospital Infantil de Mexico Federico Gomez HIMFG | Sanchez-Urbina R.,Laboratorio Of Investigacion En Biologia Del Desarrollo Y Teratogenesis Experimental | Sierra-Ramirez J.A.,National Polytechnic Institute of Mexico | Sierra-Ramirez J.A.,Instituto Nacional Of Perinatologia | And 7 more authors.
Pediatric Cardiology | Year: 2013

Congenital heart defects (CHD) are the third leading cause of death in children <1 year of age in Mexico where there is a high prevalence of the 677C→T polymorphism of the MTHFR gene. This is important because the homozygous 677T/T MTHFR gene and deficiency of folic acid (FA) intake have been associated with CHD. Our objective was to analyze the possible association between the genotype 677T/T of the MTHFR gene and supplementation of FA in Mexican women with the presence of complex CHD in their children. We analyzed genotypes of 31 mothers of children with complex CHD (group I) and 62 mothers of healthy children (group II) and investigated FA supplementation during pregnancy in both study groups. Allele frequencies in group I were 41.9 % for C and 58.1 % for T and 22.6 % for genotype frequencies CC, 38.7 % for CT, and 38.7 % for TT. Allele frequencies in group II were 63.7 % for C and 36.3 % for T and 38.7 % for genotype frequencies CC, 50 % for CT and 11.3 % for TT. Both populations are in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Odds ratio for having a child with a complex CHD was 5.9, p = 0.008 (95 % CI 1.67; 20.63) for the TT genotype. FA supplementation at any time during pregnancy was 90.3 and 87.9 % in groups II and I respectively (p > 0.05). Association was found between the maternal genotype (677/TT MTHFR) with the presence of complex CHD in their offspring. No differences in FA supplementation during any stage were found between groups. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. Source

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