Laboratorio Of Arqueozoologia M En C Ticul Alvarez Solorzano

Mexico City, Mexico

Laboratorio Of Arqueozoologia M En C Ticul Alvarez Solorzano

Mexico City, Mexico
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Perez-Crespo V.A.,National Autonomous University of Mexico | Carranza-Castaneda O.,National Autonomous University of Mexico | Arroyo-Cabrales J.,Laboratorio Of Arqueozoologia M En C Ticul Alvarez Solorzano | Morales-Puente P.,National Autonomous University of Mexico | And 5 more authors.
Revista Mexicana de Ciencias Geologicas | Year: 2017

Stable carbon and oxygen isotopes were determined in molar enamel from fossil Pliocene equids from Rancho El Ocote in the San Miguel Allende basin, Guanajuato, and from Santa María, Tecolotlán basin, Jalisco. At each locality, the source was one molar from an individual Dinohippus mexicanus and one molar from an individual Neohipparion eurystyle. Results indicated that the N. eurystyle individuals from both localities had been C3/C4 mixed feeders, and had lived in open-zone vegetation (δ13C: -3.1‰ to -1.3‰; δ18O: -4.9‰ to -6.4‰). On the other hand, the D. mexicanus from Rancho El Ocote had fed upon C4 plants and lived in open zones (δ13C: -1.3‰; δ18O: -4.9‰), whereas the D. mexicanus from Santa María was a C3/C4 mixed feeder with considerable consumption of C3 plants (δ13C: -7.7‰; δ18O: -6.4‰). These results could be contrasted to suggestions from previous isotopic work that D. mexicanus in Mexico predominantly fed on C4 plants and further samples analyses are warranted. This study contributes to the understanding of the Pliocene equid taxa from central Mexico and emphasizes the presence of different diets, ranging from exclusive C4 to mixed C3/C4 plants.


Gonzalez-Ruiz N.,Metropolitan Autonomous University | Ramirez-Pulido J.,Metropolitan Autonomous University | Arroyo-Cabrales J.,Laboratorio Of Arqueozoologia M En C Ticul Alvarez Solorzano
Mammalian Biology | Year: 2011

We describe a new species of mastiff bat (Molossus) from Mexico on the basis of 46 specimens that differ from all other species of Molossus in size, pelage coloration, and morphological characteristics. The new species is most similar to, and specimens were previously identified as, M. sinaloae; but there is no overlap in most skull measurements and the two species differ in development of sagittal and lambdoidal crests and in certain dental characteristics. M. sinaloae occurs in the dry, low tropical deciduous forest of the Pacific versant of Mexico from Sinaloa to Chiapas, a large geographic gap separates it from the new species, which has been found only in the Yucatán Peninsula. Una nueva especie del género Molossus es descrita con base a 46 ejemplares de colecciones científicas. Esta nueva especie se puede distinguir de las otras especies del género Molossus por el tamaño, la coloración del pelaje y otras características morfológicas. Durante muchos años este nuevo murciélago fue confundido como M. sinaloae, pero la mayoría de las medidas craneales no se sobreponen entre las 2 especies, además el desarrollo de las crestas sagital y lamboidea y las características dentales son diferentes. M. sinaloae se distribuye en Mexico en la vertiente del Pacífico desde Sinaloa hasta Chipas dentro de selva baja caducifolia, y existe una amplia interrupción geográfica que la separa de la nueva especie, la cual se encuentra en la Península de Yucatán. © 2010 Deutsche Gesellschaft für Säugetierkunde.


Perez-Crespo V.A.,National Autonomous University of Mexico | Schaaf P.,National Autonomous University of Mexico | Solis-Pichardo G.,National Autonomous University of Mexico | Arroyo-Cabrales J.,Laboratorio Of Arqueozoologia M En C Ticul Alvarez Solorzano | And 2 more authors.
Geological Magazine | Year: 2016

By using strontium isotopic ratios of dental enamel from molars, we were able to reconstruct the migration context for three individuals of a Columbian mammoth population (Mammuthus columbi) around Laguna de las Cruces, San Luis Potosí, central México. A three-step leaching procedure was applied to eliminate secondary Sr contributions in the molar enamel. One of the studied individuals showed 87Sr/86Sr ratios similar to those obtained from soils and plants from Laguna de las Cruces and was identified as local, whereas the other two mammoths had different molar 87Sr/86Sr values, indicative of migration and mobility contexts. ©Cambridge University Press 2016.


Perez-Crespo V.A.,National Autonomous University of Mexico | Arroyo-Cabrales J.,Laboratorio Of Arqueozoologia M En C Ticul Alvarez Solorzano | Alva-Valdivia L.M.,National Autonomous University of Mexico | Morales-Puente P.,National Autonomous University of Mexico | And 2 more authors.
Neues Jahrbuch fur Geologie und Palaontologie - Abhandlungen | Year: 2016

The diet and habitat of 47 horse individuals belonging to the genus Equus from eight Mexican localities of Late Pleistocene age were determined using δ13C and δ18O values of their apatite carbonate. The δ13C values indicated that, on average, these animals were C3/C4 mixed feeders. Some individuals, however, only ate C4 plants. Some the C3/C4 mixed feeders had significant consumption of C3 plants independent of the altitude, latitude and longitude where they were living. The type of habitat inferred was an open zone with some degree of tree coverage. These results indicated that this genus in the Mexican Pleistocene was more generalist in its diet and habitat than previously suspected. © 2016 E. Schweizerbart'sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, Stuttgart, Germany.


Alberdi M.T.,CSIC - National Museum of Natural Sciences | Arroyo-Cabrales J.,Laboratorio Of Arqueozoologia M En C Ticul Alvarez Solorzano | Marin-Leyva A.H.,Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo | Polaco O.J.,Laboratorio Of Arqueozoologia M En C Ticul Alvarez Solorzano
Revista Mexicana de Ciencias Geologicas | Year: 2014

A detailed study has been undertaken with an unique horse bone deposit at Cedral, San Luis Potosí, central Mexico. Morphological and morphometrical characters are used, as well as bivariate and multivariate statistics for both cranial and postcranial elements, and additional data incorporated for specimens from other Pleistocene Mexican localities. Measurements for most of the studied materials are provided, as well as estimates of body mass for each species. Three species are represented in several Mexican late Pleistocene deposits, coincident with the Rancholabrean Land Mammal Age. All three may have been contemporaneous: a large-sized horse Equus mexicanus Hibbard, 1955 known from the western USA throughout Mexico and Central America; a widespread medium-sized horse Equus conversidens Owen, 1869 occurring in most of North and Central America; and a new small-sized horse Equus cedralensis sp. nov., presently known only from Mexican localities. Recognizing the co-occurrence of three late Pleistocene horse species (genus Equus sp.) in Mexico is important for understanding the diversity and extinction patterns at the time of the early presence of humans in the continent. Additionally, environmental inferences are proposed, but further research is warranted to test those.


Perez-Crespo V.A.,Posgrado en Ciencias | Arroyo-Cabrales J.,Laboratorio Of Arqueozoologia M En C Ticul Alvarez Solorzano | Benammi M.,National Autonomous University of Mexico | Benammi M.,CNRS Institute of Paleoprimatology, Human Paleontoly: Evolution and Paleoenvironments | And 5 more authors.
Quaternary International | Year: 2012

Isotopic data (δ 13C and δ 18O) for 25 enamel samples from Mammuthus columbi for 13 Mexican localities are provided. On average, the samples provide evidence of a mixed C 3/C 4 diet. The population consists of six individuals with an exclusive C 4 plant diet, and 19 with some consumption of C 3 plants. Latitude, longitude, and elevation do not have an affect on the average diet. Comparisons of data from the Mexican specimens with those values in the literature for samples from California, Arizona, Florida, Nevada, New Mexico, and Texas (USA) show that food habits in North America were similar. Comparisons of δ 13C and δ 18O values with those of javelinas, mastodonts, tapirs, and white-tailed deer from the Floridan Late Pleistocene confirm that mammoths primarily were inhabitants of open areas, indicating a probable case of biomic specialization. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and INQUA.


Perez-Crespo V.A.,National Autonomous University of Mexico | Ulloa-Montemayor X.,National Autonomous University of Mexico | Acosta-Ochoa G.,National Autonomous University of Mexico | Arroyo-Cabrales J.,Laboratorio Of Arqueozoologia M En C Ticul Alvarez Solorzano | And 3 more authors.
Revista Mexicana de Biodiversidad | Year: 2012

We present isotopic values of δ13C and δ18O obtained from dental enamel in a brocket deer individual found in an archeological site. Those values show that the individual had a browser in an area of closed vegetation.


Perez-Crespo V.A.,National Autonomous University of Mexico | Arroyo-Cabrales J.,Laboratorio Of Arqueozoologia M En C Ticul Alvarez Solorzano | Alva-Valdivia L.M.,National Autonomous University of Mexico | Morales-Puente P.,National Autonomous University of Mexico | Cienfuegos-Alvarado E.,National Autonomous University of Mexico
Revista Mexicana de Ciencias Geologicas | Year: 2012

Using bioegeochemical markers δ 13C and δ 18O, we determined the diet and habitat of three extinct mammals: Camelops hesternus, Equus sp. and Mammuthus columbi, found in Laguna de las Cruces (San Luis Potosí, México). The statistical comparisons assayed among them showed that there are not differences in their diet since all of them may be classified as C 3/C 4 mixed feeders. Camelops hesternusused to have the major consumption of C 4 plants, meanwhile Mammuthus columbi and Equus sp. ate more C 3 plants. Those little differences in their feeding habits should explain their coexistence them at the site, that was a grassland with some trees, during Late Pleistocene.


Perez-Crespo V.A.,National Autonomous University of Mexico | Arroyo-Cabrales J.,Laboratorio Of Arqueozoologia M En C Ticul Alvarez Solorzano | Alva-Valdivia L.M.,Institute Geofisica | Morales-Puente P.,National Autonomous University of Mexico | Cienfuegos-Alvarado E.,National Autonomous University of Mexico
Geological Magazine | Year: 2012

Values for δ13C and δ18O obtained from molar samples from three individuals pertaining to Glyptotherium sp. from Cedral (San Luis Potosí, México) are provided and are utilized to infer general aspects of glyptodont diet and habitat. On average this animal showed a C3/C4 mixed diet, with a high consumption of C4 plants. Comparisons of the δ13CVPDB and δ 18OVPDB values for glyptodonts with horses, mastodons, mammoths and tapirs from the same locality show that glyptodonts from Cedral lived in an open habitat. © Copyright Cambridge University Press 2011.

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