Laboratorio Of Anatomia Vegetal

São Paulo, Brazil

Laboratorio Of Anatomia Vegetal

São Paulo, Brazil
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Souza Brito A.C.,University of Campinas | Ferraro A.,Laboratorio Of Anatomia Vegetal | Assuncao V.A.,Rio Of Janeiro Botanical Garden Research Institute Jbrj | Burnham R.J.,University of Michigan | Bagnatori Sartori A.L.,Federal University of Mato Grosso do Sul
Revista de Biologia Tropical | Year: 2017

In the Parana basin, the Serra de Maracaju juxtaposes the Seasonal Dry Forest and the cerradão (a phytophysiognomy of Cerrado), two distinct vegetation types that differ in canopy height, tree density, and composition of the understory. In the same way, these differences may be reflected in the composition of climbing plant species found in these two forest types. Thus, in this study we compared the climbing species in two forest fragments of Serra de Maracaju to understand: (1) Are species richness and floristic composition of climbing plants similar in cerradão and seasonal deciduous forest?, (2) What degree of floristic compositional difference exists between the two vegetation types?, (3) Do the two vegetation types differ significantly in climbing mechanisms, life forms, and dispersal syndromes represented among climbing species? For this, we established and sampled four plots per forest type over 24 months. Species were identified and each one classified, based on three discrete traits. Proportional differences were analyzed using chi-square tests. Our results showed that species richness and floristic composition of climbing plants in the cerradão and the seasonal deciduous forest were not similar. Climber species richness in cerradão was 37 while in the seasonal deciduous forest it was 31; they share only 13 species. Four families, Dioscoreaceae, Fabaceae, Malpighiaceae, and Sapindaceae, included over 60% of the climbing species. The morphological traits most common in both forest types were herbaceous life form, apical twining mechanism, and wind dispersal. Dioscoreaceae was found to be the dominant family, but is the first time to be reported for this condition in Brazil. Bignoniaceae and Passifloraceae ocurred only in the cerradão, and Asteraceae and Combretaceae in the seasonal deciduous forest; some species were found exclusively in a type of forest. Floristic composition of the cerradão and seasonal deciduous forest fragments were substantially different, in spite of physical proximity. However, their climbing species are not statistically distinct in morphological characteristics, possibly due to uniform climatic conditions and the similarity of species because of a shared ancestry (similar families). © 2017, Universidad de Costa Rica. All rights reserved.


Barbosa A.C.F.,São Paulo Institute for Technological Research | Pace M.R.,Laboratorio Of Anatomia Vegetal | Pace M.R.,University of Helsinki | Witovisk L.,Laboratorio Of Anatomia Vegetal | And 2 more authors.
IAWA Journal | Year: 2010

A new method is presented to prepare anatomical slides of plant materials including a combination of soft and hard tissues, such as stems with cambial variants, arboreal monocotyledons, and tree bark. The method integrates previous techniques aimed at softening the samples and making them thereby more homogeneous, with the use of anti-tearing polystyrene foam solution. In addition, we suggest two other alternatives to protect the sections from tearing: adhesive tape and/or Mayer's albumin adhesive, both combined with the polystyrene foam solution. This solution is cheap and easy to make by dissolving any packaging polystyrene in butyl acetate. It is applied before each section is cut on a sliding microtome and ensures that all the tissues in the section will hold together. This novel microtechnical procedure will facilitate the study of heterogeneous plant portions, as shown in some illustrated examples.


Junior W.V.A.,University of Amazon | Filho B.G.S.,University of Amazon | Lobato A.K.S.,University of Amazon | Tan D.K.Y.,University of Sydney | And 6 more authors.
Australian Journal of Crop Science | Year: 2015

The aim of this study was to investigate the responses linked to growth and morphological and anatomical changes in young plants of Parkia gigantocarpa subjected to waterlogging conditions. The experimental design was completely randomized with two water conditions (control and waterlogging) combined with five evaluation times (0, 4, 8, 12 and 16-days waterlogging conditions). The parameters evaluated were leaf specific hydraulic conductance, plant height, stem diameter, numbers of leaf and leaflets, as well as shoot dry matter, root dry matter, and total dry matter. The data were subjected to an analysis of variance, and significant differences between the means were determined using the F-test at a probability level of 5 %. Additionally, transversal sections linked to primary and secondary roots were described. The segments from the primary root (removed from region located 4 cm below of the soil surface) and the secondary root (removed from region located 4 cm from the root apex) were fixed, stained and mounted, and subsequently photo-documented. The waterlogging provoked reduction in leaf specific hydraulic conductance, as well as negative interferences on growth. Anatomically, this stress induced the appearance of hypertrophic lenticels in base of the stem, adventitious root and formation of schizogenous aerenchyma located in cortical parenchyma of the secondary root. Therefore, these results reveal the susceptibility of young Parkia gigantocarpa plants subjected to waterlogging conditions.

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