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PubMed | University of Turku, University of Helsinki, Laboratorio Nacional Of Biociencias, University of Campinas and 2 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Experimental cell research | Year: 2016

Complex molecular pathways regulate cancer invasion. This study overviewed proteins and microRNAs (miRNAs) involved in oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC) invasion. The human highly aggressive OTSCC cell line HSC-3 was examined in a 3D organotypic human leiomyoma model. Non-invasive and invasive cells were laser-captured and protein expression was analyzed using mass spectrometry-based proteomics and miRNA expression by microarray. In functional studies the 3D invasion assay was replicated after silencing candidate miRNAs, miR-498 and miR-940, in invasive OTSCC cell lines (HSC-3 and SCC-15). Cell migration, proliferation and viability were also studied in the silenced cells. In HSC-3 cells, 67 proteins and 53 miRNAs showed significant fold-changes between non-invasive vs. invasive cells. Pathway enrichment analyses allocated Focal adhesion and ECM-receptor interaction as most important for invasion. Significantly, in HSC-3 cells, miR-498 silencing decreased the invasion area and miR-940 silencing reduced invasion area and depth. Viability, proliferation and migration werent significantly affected. In SCC-15 cells, down-regulation of miR-498 significantly reduced invasion and migration. This study shows HSC-3 specific miRNA and protein expression in invasion, and suggests that miR-498 and miR-940 affect invasion in vitro, the process being more influenced by mir-940 silencing in aggressive HSC-3 cells than in the less invasive SCC-15.


Winck F.V.,Laboratorio Nacional Of Biociencias | Belloni M.,Laboratorio Nacional Of Biociencias | Pauletti B.A.,Laboratorio Nacional Of Biociencias | Zanella J.D.L.,Laboratorio Nacional Of Biociencias | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Proteomics | Year: 2014

Oral cancer disease represents a significant fraction of all human cancer types and its poor early diagnosis contributes to reduced individual survival rate. The identification of proteins modulated in tumorigenic cells and its post-translational modifications may improve our understanding of tumor development in epithelial cells. We have analyzed the phosphoproteome of tumorigenic (SCC-9) and non-tumorigenic (HaCaT) cell lines using MS-based approach in order to identify phosphopeptides with differing patterns of modifications and/or abundance. Our results revealed the identity of 4,206 protein phosphorylation sites with sixty-two sites showing to be significantly modulated between the two cell lines. The phosphoproteome data showed an overrepresentation of proteins with a possible role in nuclear regulatory functions. Pathway analysis was further performed on the phosphoproteome dataset and differences and commonalities of the functional pathways present in tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic cells were identified. Phosphopeptides that belong to the proteins lamina-associated polypeptide 2 isoform alpha and serine-arginine repetitive matrix protein 2 were identified with differential abundance and they appear as promising tumor-related phosphopeptides. These two proteins may be related to the structural alterations generally found in the nucleus of tumorigenic cells. The identification of phosphorylation sites in tumorigenic cells may contribute to disclose novel signaling mechanisms associated with OSCC. Significance: Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC) is an important cancer disease affecting thousands of people worldwide. Many cellular processes related to the development of oral cancer remain unknown; however, the studies performed in vitro with cancer cells have contributed to guide more specific research which may be further performed by using in vivo approaches or clinical samples. To our knowledge, only few studies have been published showing the results of phosphoproteome profiling of squamous cell carcinoma models, and many signaling proteins must be identified and functionally characterized in order to increase the knowledge available about the complexity of the signaling networks responsible for oral cancer development and its progression. Furthermore, our knowledge regarding proteins exclusive or very low abundant in cancer cells remains limited. A better understanding of the differences between signaling pathways present in epithelial cell lines may contribute to reveal the processes underlying the OSCC. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.


Capeletti L.B.,Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul | Capeletti L.B.,Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS) | De Oliveira L.F.,Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS) | Goncalves K.D.A.,Laboratorio Nacional Of Biociencias | And 7 more authors.
Langmuir | Year: 2014

New and more aggressive antibiotic resistant bacteria arise at an alarming rate and represent an ever-growing challenge to global health care systems. Consequently, the development of new antimicrobial agents is required to overcome the inefficiency of conventional antibiotics and bypass treatment limitations related to these pathologies. In this study, we present a synthesis protocol, which was able to entrap tetracycline antibiotic into silica nanospheres. Bactericidal efficacy of these structures was tested against bacteria that were susceptible and resistant to antibiotics. For nonresistant bacteria, our composite had bactericidal efficiency comparable to that of free-tetracycline. On the other hand, the synthesized composites were able to avoid bacterial growth of resistant bacteria while free-tetracycline has shown no significant bactericidal effect. Finally, we have investigated the cytotoxicity of these nanoparticles against mammalian cells to check any possible poisoning effect. It was found that these nanospheres are not apoptosis-inducers and only a reduction on the cell replication rate was seen when compared to the control without nanoparticles. © 2014 American Chemical Society.


PubMed | Laboratorio Nacional Of Biociencias, Embrapa Informatica Agropecuaria, University of Sao Paulo and University of Campinas
Type: | Journal: BMC bioinformatics | Year: 2015

Set comparisons permeate a large number of data analysis workflows, in particular workflows in biological sciences. Venn diagrams are frequently employed for such analysis but current tools are limited.We have developed InteractiVenn, a more flexible tool for interacting with Venn diagrams including up to six sets. It offers a clean interface for Venn diagram construction and enables analysis of set unions while preserving the shape of the diagram. Set unions are useful to reveal differences and similarities among sets and may be guided in our tool by a tree or by a list of set unions. The tool also allows obtaining subsets elements, saving and loading sets for further analyses, and exporting the diagram in vector and image formats. InteractiVenn has been used to analyze two biological datasets, but it may serve set analysis in a broad range of domains.InteractiVenn allows set unions in Venn diagrams to be explored thoroughly, by consequence extending the ability to analyze combinations of sets with additional observations, yielded by novel interactions between joined sets. InteractiVenn is freely available online at: www.interactivenn.net .


PubMed | Laboratorio Nacional Of Biociencias, Federal University of Uberlandia and University of Sao Paulo
Type: | Journal: Scientific reports | Year: 2016

Mevalonate kinase (MVK) is an essential enzyme acting in early steps of sterol isoprenoids biosynthesis, such as cholesterol in humans or ergosterol in trypanosomatids. MVK is conserved from bacteria to mammals, and localizes to glycosomes in trypanosomatids. During the course of T. cruzi MVK characterization, we found that, in addition to glycosomes, this enzyme may be secreted and modulate cell invasion. To evaluate the role of TcMVK in parasite-host cell interactions, TcMVK recombinant protein was produced and anti-TcMVK antibodies were raised in mice. TcMVK protein was detected in the supernatant of cultures of metacyclic trypomastigotes (MTs) and extracellular amastigotes (EAs) by Western blot analysis, confirming its secretion into extracellular medium. Recombinant TcMVK bound in a non-saturable dose-dependent manner to HeLa cells and positively modulated internalization of T. cruzi EAs but inhibited invasion by MTs. In HeLa cells, TcMVK induced phosphorylation of MAPK pathway components and proteins related to actin cytoskeleton modifications. We hypothesized that TcMVK is a bifunctional enzyme that in addition to playing a classical role in isoprenoid synthesis in glycosomes, it is secreted and may modulate host cell signaling required for T. cruzi invasion.


Cesarino I.,University of Campinas | Araujo P.,University of Campinas | Paes Leme A.F.,Laboratorio Nacional Of Biociencias | Creste S.,Instituto Agronomico Of Campinas | Mazzafera P.,University of Campinas
Plant Physiology and Biochemistry | Year: 2013

Secreted class III peroxidases (EC 1.11.1.7) are implicated in a broad range of physiological processes throughout the plant life cycle. However, the unambiguous determination of the precise biological role of an individual class III peroxidase isoenzyme is still a difficult task due to genetic redundancy and broad substrate specificity in vitro. In addition, many difficulties are encountered during extraction and analysis of cell wall proteins. Since class III peroxidases are also secreted into the apoplast, the use of suspension cell cultures can facilitate isolation and functional characterization of individual isoforms. Here, we report on the characterization of class III peroxidases secreted in the spent medium of sugarcane suspension cell cultures. After treatment with specific inducers of cell wall lignification, peroxidases were isolated and activities assayed with guaiacol, syringaldazine and coniferyl alcohol. Enzymatic activity was not significantly different after treatments, regardless of the substrate, with the exception of methyl-jasmonate treatment, which led to a decreased guaiacol peroxidase activity. Remarkably, peroxidases isolated from the medium were capable of oxidizing syringaldazine, an analog to sinapyl alcohol, suggesting that sugarcane cultures can produce peroxidases putatively correlated to lignification. A proteomic approach using activity staining of 2-DE gels revealed a complex isoperoxidase profile, composed predominantly of cationic isoforms. Individual spots were excised and analyzed by LC-ESI-Q-TOF and homology-based search against the Sugarcane EST Database resulted in the identification of several proteins. Spatio-temporal expression pattern of selected genes was determined for validation of identified class III peroxidases that were preferentially expressed during sugarcane stem development. © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS.


Da Silva I.T.G.,University of Brasilia | De Oliveira P.S.L.,Laboratorio Nacional Of Biociencias | Santos G.M.,University of Brasilia
Trends in Pharmacological Sciences | Year: 2015

Chromatin is the major regulator of gene expression and genome maintenance. Proteins that bind the nucleosome, the repetitive unit of chromatin, and the histone H4 tail are critical to establishing chromatin architecture and phenotypic outcomes. Intriguingly, nucleosome-binding proteins (NBPs) and the H4 tail peptide compete for the same binding site at an acidic region on the nucleosome surface. Although the essential facts about the nucleosome were revealed 17 years ago, new insights into its atomic structure and molecular mechanisms are still emerging. Several complex nucleosome:NBP structures were recently revealed, characterizing the NBP-binding sites on the nucleosome surface. Here we discuss the potential of the nucleosome surface as a therapeutic target and the impact and development of exogenous nucleosome-binding molecules (eNBMs). © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Laboratorio Nacional Of Biociencias and University of Brasilia
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Trends in pharmacological sciences | Year: 2015

Chromatin is the major regulator of gene expression and genome maintenance. Proteins that bind the nucleosome, the repetitive unit of chromatin, and the histone H4 tail are critical to establishing chromatin architecture and phenotypic outcomes. Intriguingly, nucleosome-binding proteins (NBPs) and the H4 tail peptide compete for the same binding site at an acidic region on the nucleosome surface. Although the essential facts about the nucleosome were revealed 17 years ago, new insights into its atomic structure and molecular mechanisms are still emerging. Several complex nucleosome:NBP structures were recently revealed, characterizing the NBP-binding sites on the nucleosome surface. Here we discuss the potential of the nucleosome surface as a therapeutic target and the impact and development of exogenous nucleosome-binding molecules (eNBMs).


Abe V.Y.,Laboratorio Nacional Of Biociencias | Benedetti C.E.,Laboratorio Nacional Of Biociencias
Molecular Plant Pathology | Year: 2016

Citrus canker, caused by Xanthomonas citri, affects most commercial citrus varieties. All X. citri strains possess at least one transcription activator-like effector of the PthA family that activates host disease susceptibility (S) genes. The X. citri strain 306 encodes four PthA effectors; nevertheless, only PthA4 is known to elicit cankers on citrus. As none of the PthAs act as avirulence factors on citrus, we hypothesized that PthAs 1-3 might also contribute to pathogenicity on certain hosts. Here, we show that, although PthA4 is indispensable for canker formation in six Brazilian citrus varieties, PthAs 1 and 3 contribute to canker development in 'Pera' sweet orange, but not in 'Tahiti' lemon. Deletions in two or more pthA genes reduce bacterial growth in planta more pronouncedly than single deletions, suggesting an additive role of PthAs in pathogenicity and bacterial fitness. The contribution of PthAs 1 and 3 in canker formation in 'Pera' plants does not correlate with the activation of the canker S gene, LOB1 (LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES 1), but with the induction of other PthA targets, including LOB2 and citrus dioxygenase (DIOX). LOB1, LOB2 and DIOX show differential PthA-dependent expression between 'Pera' and 'Tahiti' plants that appears to be associated with nucleotide polymorphisms found at or near PthA-binding sites. We also present evidence that LOB1 activation alone is not sufficient to elicit cankers on citrus, and that DIOX acts as a canker S gene in 'Pera', but not 'Tahiti', plants. Our results suggest that the activation of multiple S genes, such as LOB1 and DIOX, is necessary for full canker development. © 2015 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.


Neto J.,Laboratorio Nacional Of Biociencias
Development (Cambridge, England) | Year: 2012

The Latin American Society for Developmental Biology (LASDB) is getting ready for their Sixth International Meeting, which will be held in Montevideo, Uruguay, from April 26th to 29th, 2012. To find out more about the society, and about developmental biology in Latin America, we talked to LASDB president José Xavier Neto, who studies heart morphogenesis at the Laboratório Nacional de Biociências in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

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