Laboratorio Of Igiene

San Martino dall'Argine, Italy

Laboratorio Of Igiene

San Martino dall'Argine, Italy
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Di Biagio A.,Italian National Cancer Institute | Rusconi S.,University of Milan | Marzocchetti A.,Catholic University of the Sacred Heart | Signori A.,University of Genoa | And 109 more authors.
Journal of Medical Virology | Year: 2014

The factors influencing virological response to first-line combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) in an Italian cohort of HIV-1-infected patients were examined. Eligible patients were those enrolled in a national prospective observational cohort (Antiretroviral Resistance Cohort Analysis), starting first-line cART between 2001 and 2011 and who had at least one follow-up of HIV-1 RNA. The primary endpoint was virological success, defined as the first viral load <50 copies/ml. Time to events were analyzed by Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazard model. One thousand three hundred five patients met the study inclusion criteria. In a multivariable model adjusting for transmission mode, presence of transmitted drug resistance, baseline CD4+ cell count, viral subtype, and type of NRTI backbone employed, independent predictors of virological success were higher baseline viral load (≥500,000 vs. <100,000 HR 0.52; P<0.001), a weighted genotypic susceptibility score (wGSS) <3 (HR 0.58; P=0.003), male sex (HR 0.76 P=0.001), and type of initial third drug employed (integrase inhibitor vs. boosted protease inhibitors HR 3.23; P<0.001). In the subset with HIV-1 RNA >100,000 copies/ml, virologic success was only associated with the use of integrase inhibitors in the first cART regimen. Independent predictors of immunological success were baseline CD4+ cell count and wGSS <3. High baseline HIV-1 RNA, predicted activity of the first-line regimen based on genotypic resistance testing, gender, and use of new agents were found to predict time to achieve virological success. The type of initial nucleoside analog backbone was not found to predict virological response. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Rosso R.,University of Genoa | Di Biagio A.,University of Genoa | Maggiolo F.,Ospedali Riuniti | Nulvesu L.,University of Genoa | And 4 more authors.
AIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV | Year: 2012

The choice of an antiretroviral regimen can often impact on adherence, treatment satisfaction and therefore influence on clinical outcome. These concerns are particularly true in adolescents. In this setting, adherence is usually affected by multifactor events and biopsychosocial factors, which connect and changeover time. We evaluated the effect of a switch to a single-pill fixed-dose regimen on patient-reported outcomes, virologic and immunologic outcomes, and safety in a cohort of adolescents with perinatal HIV-1 infection. In addition, we evaluated the effect on low-level residual HIV-RNA. An open-label, non-randomised study was performed: 12 adolescents with a confirmed viremia <50 copies/mL treated with lamivudine or emtricitabine, tenofovir and efavirenz were switched to one-pill fixed-dose regimen of emtricitabine/tenofovir/efavirenz. At the end of follow-up, the new regimen was associated with improvements in treatment satisfaction, HIV-symptoms, whereas adherence remained high. No immunological or virological significative changes were observed. No side-effects were registered. Moreover, the low-level residual HIV-RNA was <3 copie/mL in all patients. One-pill fixed-dose regimen is an added value that favours adherence, reduces HIV-symptoms, improves patients satisfaction and could better control of HIV-RNA in adolescents, too. © 2012 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

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