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Mendoza-Ibarra J.A.,Complutense University of Madrid | Ortega-Mora L.M.,Complutense University of Madrid | Pedraza-Diaz S.,Complutense University of Madrid | Rojo-Montejo S.,Complutense University of Madrid | And 6 more authors.
Veterinary Journal | Year: 2013

Bovine trichomonosis (BT) is a sexually transmitted disease of cattle caused by infection with Tritrichomonas foetus. In a recent study, T. foetus infection was detected in 41.5% of herds of an endangered beef breed, the Asturiana de la Montaña (AM), which is farmed under extensive, mountain pastoral systems in northern Spain. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of this pathogen in the more production-centred Asturiana de los Valles (AV) beef breed farmed in the same region, and to identify potential associated management risk factors. Infection was detected in a significantly smaller number (5.2%) of AV herds, despite the fact that both populations share the same ecological niche. Communal grazing was not identified as significant risk factor and study results suggest the prevalence of BT is likely to vary considerably depending on how the cattle are managed. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Rengifo-Herrera C.,Complutense University of Madrid | Ferre I.,Complutense University of Madrid | Ortega-Mora L.M.,Complutense University of Madrid | Rojo-Montejo S.,Complutense University of Madrid | And 5 more authors.
Polar Biology | Year: 2014

Information on helminth parasites in Antarctic phocids is scarce and fragmented. Anisakidae nematodes and Diphyllobothriidae cestodes have been reported in Antarctic and subantarctic phocids, although the prevalence and health significance remain unclear. In the present study, the presence of helminth parasites in faeces of Leptonychotes weddellii, Hydrurga leptonyx and Mirounga leonina has been investigated. Faecal samples were collected from different locations of the Antarctic Peninsula. Macroscopical inspection and standard flotation and migration techniques were used for faecal examination. Eggs, larvae and adult parasites of nematodes and cestodes were found in 76.9 % of samples analysed. Positive samples were recorded from all locations surveyed and species investigated. The prevalence was 71.3 % for M. leonina, 95.4 % for L. weddellii and 100 % for H. leptonyx. Anisakidae (eggs and worms), Metastrongyloidea (larvae) and Diphyllobothriidae (eggs) were identified in M. leonina and L. weddellii. Metastrongyloidea (larvae) and Diphyllobothriidae (eggs) were found in H. leptonyx. Molecular characterisation of some of the adult parasites found was useful for the identification of Anisakis simplex and Pseudoterranova sp. in M. leonina, and Contracaecum sp., Contracaecum osculatum, and Pseudoterranova sp. in L. weddellii. © 2014 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Source


Mendoza-Ibarra J.A.,Complutense University of Madrid | Pedraza-Diaz S.,Complutense University of Madrid | Garcia-Pena F.J.,Laboratorio Central Of Veterinaria Of Algete | Rojo-Montejo S.,Complutense University of Madrid | And 6 more authors.
Veterinary Journal | Year: 2012

Bovine trichomonosis (BT) and bovine genital campylobacteriosis (BGC) are sexually transmitted diseases that can be important infectious causes of reproductive failure in extensively managed beef cattle where natural mating is a common practice. However, their prevalence in Europe was thought to be insignificant or very low. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence and risk factors associated with BT and BCG in a representative beef cattle breed, Asturiana de la Montaña (AM), which is usually managed extensively in the mountain areas of Northern Spain and putative risk factors associated with the two diseases are present on most farms holding AM cattle. Preputial smegma samples were collected from 103 bulls belonging to 65 herds. Pathogen detection was undertaken using culture and PCR. Two scraping methods for sample collection (AI pipette and plastic scraper), as well as different culture media and DNA extraction methods were evaluated on field samples. Campylobacter fetus veneralis infection was not detected in any animal in any herd. However, Tritrichomonas foetus infection was demonstrated in 32% (33/103) and 41.5% (27/65) of bulls and herds tested, respectively. AM bulls older than 3. years (39.7%) were more likely to be infected than young bulls (16%) (OR = 3.45, CI = 1.07-11.19). An increase in repeat breeder cows was reported in herds from which T. foetus was detected (OR = 5.2, CI = 1.5-17.18). These findings highlight the re-emergence of this disease in extensively managed beef cattle in Spain. For routine diagnosis, the use of a culture technique and PCR in combination is advisable for testing smegma samples under field conditions. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. Source

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