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Jeste S.S.,University of California at Los Angeles | Wu J.Y.,Mattel Childrens Hospital | Senturk D.,University of California at Los Angeles | Varcin K.,Laboratories of Cognitive Neuroscience | And 6 more authors.
Neurology | Year: 2014

Objective: We performed a longitudinal cohort study of infants with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), with the overarching goal of defining early clinical, behavioral, and biological markers of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in this high-risk population. Methods: Infants with TSC and typically developing controls were recruited as early as 3 months of age and followed longitudinally until 36 months of age. Data gathered at each time point included detailed seizure history, developmental testing using the Mullen Scales of Early Learning, and socialcommunication assessments using the Autism Observation Scale for Infants. At 18 to 36 months, a diagnostic evaluation for ASD was performed using the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule. Results: Infants with TSC demonstrated delays confined to nonverbal abilities, particularly in the visual domain, which then generalized to more global delays by age 9 months. Twenty-two of 40 infants with TSC were diagnosed with ASD. Both 12-month cognitive ability and developmental trajectories over the second and third years of life differentiated the groups. By 12 months of age, the ASD group demonstrated significantly greater cognitive delays and a significant decline in nonverbal IQ from 12 to 36 months. Conclusions: This prospective study characterizes early developmental markers of ASD in infants with TSC. The early delay in visual reception and fine motor ability in the TSC group as a whole, coupled with the decline in nonverbal ability in infants diagnosed with ASD, suggests a domainspecific pathway to ASD that can inform more targeted interventions for these high-risk infants. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.


PubMed | Laboratories of Cognitive Neuroscience and Harvard University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Cerebral cortex (New York, N.Y. : 1991) | Year: 2016

Developmental dyslexia (DD) is highly heritable and previous studies observed reduced cortical volume, white matter integrity, and functional alterations in left posterior brain regions in individuals with DD. The primary sulcal pattern has been hypothesized to relate to optimal organization and connections of cortical functional areas. It is determined during prenatal development and may reflect early, genetically influenced, brain development. We characterize the sulcal pattern using graph-based pattern analysis and investigate whether sulcal patterns in parieto-temporal and occipito-temporal regions are atypical in elementary school-age children with DD and pre-readers/beginning readers (preschoolers/kindergarteners) with a familial risk (elementary school-age children: n [males/females], age range = 17/11, 84-155 months; preschoolers/kindergarteners: 16/15, 59-84 months). The pattern of sulcal basin area in left parieto-temporal and occipito-temporal regions was significantly atypical (more sulcal basins of smaller size) in children with DD and further correlated with reduced reading performance on single- and nonword reading measures. A significantly atypical sulcal area pattern was also confirmed in younger preschoolers/kindergarteners with a familial risk of DD. Our results provide further support for atypical early brain development in DD and suggest that DD may originate from altered organization or connections of cortical areas in the left posterior regions.

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