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Diop M.,University of the Littoral Opal Coast | Diop M.,Laboratoire Of Toxicologie Et Dhydrologie Lth | Amara R.,University of the Littoral Opal Coast
Environmental Science and Pollution Research | Year: 2016

This paper presents the results of seasonal (wet and dry seasons) and spatial (five sites) variation of mercury concentration in seven marine organisms representative for shallow Senegalese coastal waters and including species of commercial importance. Total mercury levels were recorded in the green algae (Ulva lactuca); the brown mussel (Perna perna); the Caramote prawn (Penaeus kerathurus); and in the liver and muscles of the following fish: Solea senegalensis, Mugil cephalus, Saratherondon melanotheron, and Sardinella aurita. The total selenium (Se) contents were determined only in the edible part of Perna perna, Penaeus kerathurus and in the muscles of Sardinella aurita and Solea senegalensis. Hg concentration in fish species was higher in liver compared to the muscle. Between species differences in Hg, concentrations were recorded with the highest concentration found in fish and the lowest in algae. The spatiotemporal study showed that there was no clear seasonal pattern in Hg concentrations in biota, but spatial differences existed with highest concentrations in sites located near important anthropogenic pressure. For shrimp, mussel, and the muscles of sardine and sole, Hg concentrations were below the health safety limits for human consumption as defined by the European Union. The Se/Hg molar ratio was always higher than one whatever the species or location suggesting a protection of Se against Hg potential adverse effect. © 2016 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg Source


Diop M.,Laboratoire Doceanologie Et Of Geosciences Log | Diop M.,Laboratoire Of Toxicologie Et Dhydrologie Lth | Howsam M.,Lille University of Science and Technology | Diop C.,Laboratoire Of Toxicologie Et Dhydrologie Lth | And 4 more authors.
Chemosphere | Year: 2016

Concentrations of 11 elements (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Se,V and Zn) were quantified in liver and muscle from two commercially important fish species from the Senegalese coast. The fish, a small pelagic species (the round sardinella) and a benthic species (the Senegalese sole) were collected from five sites during the dry and wet seasons in 2013. For both species, elements were more concentrated in liver than in muscle. There was no clear seasonal pattern in concentration of elements, however inter-site differences were observed. We found significant differences in element concentrations between the two studied species, likely associated with their behavior, feeding and habitat use. The concentrations of Cd, Fe, and Pb were significantly higher in sardinella whereas concentration of As, Cu, Cr, Mn and Se were highest in sole. The concentration of cadmium was particularly high in the liver of sardinella (from 0.9 to 56 mg kg-1, with a mean ± sd of 17.2 ± 11.5 mg kg-1) and may be related to anthropogenic pressure such as the phosphate industry but also to the upwelling current which brings dissolved elements to the surface that are taken up by plankton. The results showed that concentrations of Cd and Pb were below the limit values established by the European Community and pose no threat to public health. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Diop M.,Laboratoire Doceanologie Et Of Geosciences Log | Diop M.,Laboratoire Of Toxicologie Et Dhydrologie Lth | Howsam M.,Lille University of Science and Technology | Diop C.,Laboratoire Of Toxicologie Et Dhydrologie Lth | And 3 more authors.
Marine Pollution Bulletin | Year: 2015

Concentrations of 11 elements were quantified in five marine species from different trophic levels of a food web (algae, mussel, shrimp and fish), representative for shallow Senegalese coastal waters, and including species of commercial importance. Significant differences in element concentrations and bioaccumulation were demonstrated, revealing the utility of employing a suite of organisms as bioindicators to monitor metal contamination in coastal areas. There was no clear seasonal pattern in concentration of elements, however inter-site differences were observed. Calculations of transfer factors for all the studied elements showed that transfer factors from water were greater than those from sediments. For shrimp and mussel, the concentrations of Pb and Cd were below the EU's maximum level for human consumption, however high concentrations of arsenic in shrimp were recorded at all sites. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Source

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