Entity

Time filter

Source Type


Combes A.,CNRS Laboratory of Communication Molecules and Adaptation of Microorganisms | Dellinger M.,CNRS Laboratory of Communication Molecules and Adaptation of Microorganisms | CadelSix S.,Laboratoire Of Securite Des Aliments Of Maisons Alfort Anses | Amand S.,CNRS Laboratory of Communication Molecules and Adaptation of Microorganisms | Comte K.,CNRS Laboratory of Communication Molecules and Adaptation of Microorganisms
Aquatic Toxicology | Year: 2013

The proliferation of microcystins (MCs)-producing cyanobacteria (MCs) can have detrimental effects on the food chain in aquatic environments. Until recently, few studies had focused on the fate of MCs in exposed organisms, such as primary consumers of cyanobacteria. In this study, we investigate the impact of an MC-producing strain of the cyanobacterium Planktothrix agardhii on the growth and physiology of a Nassula sp. ciliate isolated from a non-toxic cyanobacterial bloom. We show that this Nassula sp. strain was able to consume and grow while feeding exclusively on an MC-producing cyanobacterium over a prolonged period of time (8 months). In short-term exposure experiments (8 days), ciliates consuming an MC-producing cyanobacterial strain displayed slower growth rate and higher levels of antioxidant enzymes than ciliates feeding on two non-MC-producing strains. Three high-performance methods (LC/MS, LC/MS-MS and ELISA) were used to quantify the free and bound MCs in the culture medium and in the cells. We show that ciliate grazing led to a marked decrease in free MCs (methanol extractable) in cells, the MCs were therefore no longer found in the surrounding culture medium. These findings suggest that MCs may have undergone redistribution (free vs bound MCs) or chemical degradation within the ciliates. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. Source

Discover hidden collaborations