Laboratoire Of La Sante Des Vegetaux Lsv

Malzéville, France

Laboratoire Of La Sante Des Vegetaux Lsv

Malzéville, France
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Marche L.,French National Institute for Agricultural Research | Saraoui T.,French National Institute for Agricultural Research | Saraoui T.,French Research Institute for Exploitation of the Sea | Saraoui T.,Clermont University | And 7 more authors.
Genome Announcements | Year: 2017

Lactococcus piscium CNCM I-4031 is a psychotrophic foodborne lactic acid bacterium showing potential interest for the biopreservation of seafood products due to its inhibition properties toward pathogenic and spoilage bacteria. The analysis of its genome will provide a better understanding of the mechanisms of interaction between these bacteria. © 2017 Marché et al.


Aguayo J.,Laboratoire Of La Sante Des Vegetaux Lsv | Mostert D.,Stellenbosch University | Fourrier-Jeandel C.,Laboratoire Of La Sante Des Vegetaux Lsv | Cerf-Wendling I.,Laboratoire Of La Sante Des Vegetaux Lsv | And 3 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2017

Fusarium oxysporum f. Sp. Cubense (Foc) is one of the most important threats to global banana production. Strategies to control the pathogen are lacking, with plant resistance offering the only long-term solution, if sources of resistance are available. Prevention of introduction of Foc into disease-free areas thus remains a key strategy to continue sustainable banana production. In recent years, strains of Foc affecting Cavendish bananas have destroyed plantations in a number of countries in Asia and in the Middle East, and one African country. One vegetative compatibility group (VCG), 01213/16, is considered the major threat to bananas in tropical and subtropical climatic conditions. However, other genetically related VCGs, such as 0121, may potentially jeopardize banana cultures if they were introduced into disease-free areas. To prevent the introduction of these VCGs into disease-free Cavendish banana-growing countries, a real-time PCR test was developed to accurately detect both VCGs. A previously described putative virulence gene was used to develop a specific combination of hydrolysis probe/primers for the detection of tropical Foc race 4 strains. The real-time PCR parameters were optimized by following a statistical approach relying on orthogonal arrays and the Taguchi method in an attempt to enhance sensitivity and ensure high specificity of the assay. This study also assessed critical performance criteria, such as repeatability, reproducibility, robustness, and specificity, with a large including set of 136 F. oxysporum isolates, including 73 Foc pathogenic strains representing 24 VCGs. The validation data demonstrated that the new assay could be used for regulatory testing applications on banana plant material and can contribute to preventing the introduction and spread of Foc strains affecting Cavendish bananas in the tropics. © 2017 Aguayo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.


Desprez-Loustau M.-L.,French National Institute for Agricultural Research | Desprez-Loustau M.-L.,University of Bordeaux 1 | Aguayo J.,Laboratoire Of La Sante Des Vegetaux Lsv | Dutech C.,French National Institute for Agricultural Research | And 14 more authors.
Annals of Forest Science | Year: 2016

Key message: Increasing human impacts on forests, including unintentional movement of pathogens, climate change, and large-scale intensive plantations, are associated with an unprecedented rate of new diseases. An evolutionary ecology perspective can help address these challenges and provide direction for sustainable forest management. Context: Forest pathology has historically relied on an ecological approach to understand and address the practical management of forest diseases. A widening of this perspective to include evolutionary considerations has been increasingly developed in response to the rising rates of genetic change in both pathogen populations and tree populations due to human activities. Aims: Here, five topics for which the evolutionary perspective is especially relevant are highlighted. Results: The first relates to the evolutionary diversity of fungi and fungal-like organisms, with issues linked to the identification of species and their ecological niches. The second theme deals with the evolutionary processes that allow forest pathogens to adapt to new hosts after introductions or to become more virulent in homogeneous plantations. The third theme presents issues linked to disease resistance in tree breeding programs (e.g., growth-defense trade-offs) and proposes new criteria and methods for more durable resistance. The last two themes are dedicated to the biotic environment of the tree–pathogen system, namely, hyperparasites and tree microbiota, as possible solutions for health management. Conclusion: We conclude by highlighting three major conceptual advances brought by evolutionary biology, i.e., that (i) “not everything is everywhere”, (ii) evolution of pathogen populations can occur on short time scales, and (iii) the tree is a multitrophic community. We further translate these into a framework for immediate policy recommendations and future directions for research. © 2015, INRA and Springer-Verlag France.

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