Murviel-lès-Montpellier, France
Murviel-lès-Montpellier, France

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Lesca G.,Service de Genetique | Lesca G.,University Claude Bernard Lyon 1 | Moizard M.-P.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | Boggio D.,Service de Genetique | And 11 more authors.
American Journal of Medical Genetics, Part A | Year: 2013

FG syndrome, Lujan syndrome, and Ohdo syndrome, the Maat-Kievit-Brunner type, have been described as distinct syndromes with overlapping non-specific features and different missense mutations of the MED12 gene have been reported in all of them. We report a family including 10 males and 1 female affected with profound non-specific intellectual disability (ID) which was linked to a 30-cM region extending from Xp11.21 (ALAS2) to Xq22.3 (COL4A5). Parallel sequencing of all X-chromosome exons identified a frameshift mutation (c.5898dupC) of MED12. Mutated mRNA was not affected by non-sense mediated RNA decay and induced an additional abnormal isoform due to activation of cryptic splice-sites in exon 41. Dysmorphic features common to most affected males were long narrow face, high forehead, flat malar area, high nasal bridge, and short philtrum. Language was absent or very limited. Most patients had a friendly personality. Cognitive impairment, varying from borderline to profound ID was similarly observed in seven heterozygous females. There was no correlation between cognitive function and X-chromosome inactivation profiles in blood cells. The severe degree of ID in male patients, as well as variable cognitive impairment in heterozygous females suggests that the duplication observed in the present family may have a more severe effect on MED12 function than missense mutations. In a cognitively impaired male from this family, who also presented with tall stature and dysmorphism and did not have the MED12 mutation, a 600-kb duplication at 17p13.3 including the YWHAE gene, was found in a mosaic state. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Froyen G.,Catholic University of Leuven | Belet S.,Catholic University of Leuven | Martinez F.,Hospital Universitario La Paz | Santos-Reboucas C.B.,State University of Rio de Janeiro | And 25 more authors.
American Journal of Human Genetics | Year: 2012

We previously reported on nonrecurrent overlapping duplications at Xp11.22 in individuals with nonsyndromic intellectual disability (ID) harboring HSD17B10, HUWE1, and the microRNAs miR-98 and let-7f-2 in the smallest region of overlap. Here, we describe six additional individuals with nonsyndromic ID and overlapping microduplications that segregate in the families. High-resolution mapping of the 12 copy-number gains reduced the minimal duplicated region to the HUWE1 locus only. Consequently, increased mRNA levels were detected for HUWE1, but not HSD17B10. Marker and SNP analysis, together with identification of two de novo events, suggested a paternally derived intrachromosomal duplication event. In four independent families, we report on a polymorphic 70 kb recurrent copy-number gain, which harbors part of HUWE1 (exon 28 to 3′ untranslated region), including miR-98 and let-7f-2. Our findings thus demonstrate that HUWE1 is the only remaining dosage-sensitive gene associated with the ID phenotype. Junction and in silico analysis of breakpoint regions demonstrated simple microhomology-mediated rearrangements suggestive of replication-based duplication events. Intriguingly, in a single family, the duplication was generated through nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR) with the use of HUWE1-flanking imperfect low-copy repeats, which drive this infrequent NAHR event. The recurrent partial HUWE1 copy-number gain was also generated through NAHR, but here, the homologous sequences used were identified as TcMAR-Tigger DNA elements, a template that has not yet been reported for NAHR. In summary, we showed that an increased dosage of HUWE1 causes nonsyndromic ID and demonstrated that the Xp11.22 region is prone to recombination- and replication-based rearrangements. © 2012 The American Society of Human Genetics.


PubMed | Nancy University Hospital Center, Service de Genetique Clinique, Laboratoire Of Cytogenetique Constitutionnelle Et Prenatale, Departement de Genetique Medicale and 22 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: American journal of medical genetics. Part A | Year: 2016

Xq28 duplications encompassing MECP2 have been described in male patients with a severe neurodevelopmental disorder associated with hypotonia and spasticity, severe learning disability, stereotyped movements, and recurrent pulmonary infections. We report on standardized brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data of 30 affected patients carrying an Xq28 duplication involving MECP2 of various sizes (228kb to 11.7Mb). The aim of this study was to seek recurrent malformations and attempt to determine whether variations in imaging features could be explained by differences in the size of the duplications. We showed that 93% of patients had brain MRI abnormalities such as corpus callosum abnormalities (n=20), reduced volume of the white matter (WM) (n=12), ventricular dilatation (n=9), abnormal increased hyperintensities on T2-weighted images involving posterior periventricular WM (n=6), and vermis hypoplasia (n=5). The occipitofrontal circumference varied considerably between >+2SD in five patients and <-2SD in four patients. Among the nine patients with dilatation of the lateral ventricles, six had a duplication involving L1CAM. The only patient harboring bilateral posterior subependymal nodular heterotopia also carried an FLNA gene duplication. We could not demonstrate a correlation between periventricular WM hyperintensities/delayed myelination and duplication of the IKBKG gene. We thus conclude that patients with an Xq28 duplication involving MECP2 share some similar but non-specific brain abnormalities. These imaging features, therefore, could not constitute a diagnostic clue. The genotype-phenotype correlation failed to demonstrate a relationship between the presence of nodular heterotopia, ventricular dilatation, WM abnormalities, and the presence of FLNA, L1CAM, or IKBKG, respectively, in the duplicated segment.


PubMed | Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, CHRU de Montpellier and Laboratoire Of Genetique Chromosomique
Type: Case Reports | Journal: American journal of medical genetics. Part A | Year: 2016

Intellectual disability (ID) is a frequent feature but is highly clinically and genetically heterogeneous. The establishment of the precise diagnosis in patients with ID is challenging due to this heterogeneity but crucial for genetic counseling and appropriate care for the patients. Among the etiologies of patients with ID, apparently balanced de novo rearrangements represent 0.6%. Several mechanisms explain the ID in patients with apparently balanced de novo rearrangement. Among them, disruption of a disease gene at the breakpoint, is frequently evoked. In this context, technologies recently developed are used to characterize precisely such chromosomal rearrangements. Here, we report the case of a boy with ID, facial features and autistic behavior who is carrying a de novo balanced reciprocal translocation t(3;7)(q11.2;q11.22)dn. Using microarray analysis, array painting (AP) technology combined with molecular study, we have identified the interruption of the autism susceptibility candidate 2 gene (AUTS2) and EPH receptor A6 gene (EPHA6). We consider that the disruption of AUTS2 explains the phenotype of the patient; the exact role of EPHA6 in human pathology is not well defined. Based on the observation of recurrent germinal and somatic translocations involving AUTS2 and the molecular environment content, we put forward the hypothesis that the likely chromosomal mechanism responsible for the translocation could be due either to replicative stress or to recombination-based mechanisms.


Popovici C.,Laboratoire Of Genetique Chromosomique | Popovici C.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | Busa T.,Unite de Genetique Clinique | Busa T.,Aix - Marseille University | And 6 more authors.
European Journal of Medical Genetics | Year: 2013

Deletions in 15q13.3 belong to the most frequently identified recurrent CNVs, and lead to mental retardation, seizures and minor dysmorphism. We report on two monozygotic twin boys with a mosaic 1.5Mb deletion in 15q13.3, including CHRNA7. The growth parameters were in the normal range for both twins. Both had language delay with hyperactivity, temper tantrums and poor social interaction but attended regular school. The percentage of abnormal cells was 40% on lymphocytes, and 25 and 35% on buccal smear in the first and second twins, respectively. The mosaicism for the 15q13.3 deletion can explain the milder phenotype observed in these two boys. © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS.


Tachon G.,CHRU Arnaud de Villeneuve | Tachon G.,Laboratoire Of Genetique Chromosomique | Lefort G.,Laboratoire Of Genetique Chromosomique | Puechberty J.,CHRU Arnaud de Villeneuve | And 10 more authors.
Human Reproduction | Year: 2014

We report a case of discordant phenotypic sex in monozygotic twins mosaic 47,XXY/46,XX: monozygotic heterokaryotypic twins. The twins presented with cognitive and comprehension delay, behavioural and language disorders, all symptoms frequently reported in Klinefelter syndrome. Molecular zygosity analysis with several markers confirmed that the twins are in effect monozygotic (MZ). Array comparative genomic hybridization found no evidence for the implication of copy number variation in the phenotypes. Ultrasound scans of the reproductive organs revealed no abnormalities. Endocrine tests showed a low testosterone level in Twin 1 (male phenotype) and a low gonadotrophin level in Twin 2 (female phenotype) which, combined with the results from ultrasound examination, provided useful information for potentially predicting the future fertility potential of the twins. Blood karyotypes revealed the presence of a normal 46,XX cell line and an aneuploïd 47,XXY cell line in both patients. Examination of the chromosome constitutions of various tissues such as blood, buccal smear and urinary sediment not surprisingly showed different proportions for the 46,XX and 47,XXY cell lines, which most likely explains the discordant phenotypic sex and mild Klinefelter features. The most plausible underlying biological mechanism is a post-zygotic loss of the Y chromosome in an initially 47,XXY zygote. This would result in an embryo with both 46,XX and 47,XXY cells lines which could subsequently divide into two monozygotic embryos through a twinning process. The two cell lines would then be distributed differently between tissues which could result in phenotypic discordances in the twins. These observations emphasize the importance of regular paediatric evaluations to determine the optimal timing for fertility preservation measures and to detect new Klinefelter features which could appear throughout childhood in the two subjects. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology.


PubMed | Montpellier University, Unite Medicale des Maladies Auto inflammatoire, Laboratoire Of Genetique Chromosomique, Service de Radiopediatrie and 2 more.
Type: Case Reports | Journal: Human reproduction (Oxford, England) | Year: 2014

We report a case of discordant phenotypic sex in monozygotic twins mosaic 47,XXY/46,XX: monozygotic heterokaryotypic twins. The twins presented with cognitive and comprehension delay, behavioural and language disorders, all symptoms frequently reported in Klinefelter syndrome. Molecular zygosity analysis with several markers confirmed that the twins are in effect monozygotic (MZ). Array comparative genomic hybridization found no evidence for the implication of copy number variation in the phenotypes. Ultrasound scans of the reproductive organs revealed no abnormalities. Endocrine tests showed a low testosterone level in Twin 1 (male phenotype) and a low gonadotrophin level in Twin 2 (female phenotype) which, combined with the results from ultrasound examination, provided useful information for potentially predicting the future fertility potential of the twins. Blood karyotypes revealed the presence of a normal 46,XX cell line and an aneuplod 47,XXY cell line in both patients. Examination of the chromosome constitutions of various tissues such as blood, buccal smear and urinary sediment not surprisingly showed different proportions for the 46,XX and 47,XXY cell lines, which most likely explains the discordant phenotypic sex and mild Klinefelter features. The most plausible underlying biological mechanism is a post-zygotic loss of the Y chromosome in an initially 47,XXY zygote. This would result in an embryo with both 46,XX and 47,XXY cells lines which could subsequently divide into two monozygotic embryos through a twinning process. The two cell lines would then be distributed differently between tissues which could result in phenotypic discordances in the twins. These observations emphasize the importance of regular paediatric evaluations to determine the optimal timing for fertility preservation measures and to detect new Klinefelter features which could appear throughout childhood in the two subjects.


Coutton C.,Laboratoire Of Genetique Chromosomique | Coutton C.,Joseph Fourier University | Poreau B.,Service de Genetique Clinique | Devillard F.,Laboratoire Of Genetique Chromosomique | And 8 more authors.
Molecular Syndromology | Year: 2014

Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is the most common forebrain defect in humans. It results from incomplete midline cleavage of the prosencephalon and can be caused by environmental and genetic factors. HPE is usually described as a continuum of brain malformations from the most severe alobar HPE to the middle interhemispheric fusion variant or syntelencephaly. A microform of HPE is limited to craniofacial features such as congenital nasal pyriform aperture stenosis and single central maxillary incisor, without brain malformation. Among the heterogeneous causes of HPE, point mutations and deletions in the SHH gene at 7q36 have been identified as well as extremely rare chromosomal rearrangements in the long-range enhancers of this gene. Here, we report a boy with an HPE microform associated with a Currarino syndrome. Array CGH detected a de novo 2.7-Mb deletion in the 7q36.3 region including the MNX1 gene, usually responsible for the Currarino triad but excluding SHH, which is just outside the deletion. This new case provides further evidence of the importance of the SHH long-range enhancers in the HPE spectrum. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.


PubMed | Grenoble University Hospital Center, Service de Genetique Clinique, Laboratoire Of Genetique Chromosomique, Joseph Fourier University and Service de Radiologie et Imagerie Medicale
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Molecular syndromology | Year: 2014

Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is the most common forebrain defect in humans. It results from incomplete midline cleavage of the prosencephalon and can be caused by environmental and genetic factors. HPE is usually described as a continuum of brain malformations from the most severe alobar HPE to the middle interhemispheric fusion variant or syntelencephaly. A microform of HPE is limited to craniofacial features such as congenital nasal pyriform aperture stenosis and single central maxillary incisor, without brain malformation. Among the heterogeneous causes of HPE, point mutations and deletions in the SHH gene at 7q36 have been identified as well as extremely rare chromosomal rearrangements in the long-range enhancers of this gene. Here, we report a boy with an HPE microform associated with a Currarino syndrome. Array CGH detected a de novo 2.7-Mb deletion in the 7q36.3 region including the MNX1 gene, usually responsible for the Currarino triad but excluding SHH, which is just outside the deletion. This new case provides further evidence of the importance of the SHH long-range enhancers in the HPE spectrum.

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