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Cachan, France

Navaro J.,Arts et Metiers ParisTech | Navaro J.,Laboratoire GREMACOR | Bruneau D.,Arts et Metiers ParisTech | Colin J.,Laboratoire GREMACOR | Dony A.,Laboratoire GREMACOR
Construction and Building Materials | Year: 2012

In order to contribute to the protection of the environment, asphalt concrete is produced incorporating a high percentage (70%) of reclaimed materials from the deconstruction of road surfaces under renovation. In this paper we propose a microscopic observation technique to appreciate the way the virgin binder and the reclaimed asphalt pavement binder blend together. This technique is applied to compacted samples. Quantitative indicators are proposed to characterise the properties of the blend of binders and quantify the influence that production parameters, materials temperature and mixing time, have on the disappearance kinetics of the reclaimed asphalt pavement binder clusters initially present. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Source


Navaro J.,Arts et Metiers ParisTech | Navaro J.,Laboratoire GREMACOR | Bruneau D.,Arts et Metiers ParisTech | Colin J.,Laboratoire GREMACOR | Dony A.,Laboratoire GREMACOR
EPJ Applied Physics | Year: 2012

When asphalt concrete is manufactured incorporating a high percentage (almost 70%) of reclaimed materials from the deconstruction of road surfaces under renovation, and when the corresponding production device is designed specifically to reduce the energy input need (lowering the production temperature), the resulting manufacturing process contributes to the protection of the environment and reduces production costs. However, to meet the quality requirements of the finished product, virgin materials of appropriate quality and quantity must also be added (mineral aggregates and new asphalt binder) and control systems set up to quantify and optimize the parameters involved (thus avoiding the guess work which still often prevails today). It was for this reason that a new experimental technique described here was devised, which will ultimately be used in asphalt concrete production plants. The technique involves lixiviating reclaimed asphalt concrete using a chlorinated solvent; the resulting solute is collected gradually, then the mixture of binders (virgin and reclaimed asphalt concrete) can be characterized and their mass fractions quantified using a combination of UV and IR spectrometry. With this experimental technique we were able to assess the extent to which the reclaimed asphalt pavement binder participates in the agglomeration and cohesion of the reclaimed asphalt concrete. This assessment was made in terms of the main parameters in the production process, temperature of the materials and mixing time. © 2012 EDP Sciences. Source

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