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Hassani R.T.J.,Center Hospitalier National dOphtalmologie des Quinze Vingts | Brasnu E.,Center Hospitalier National dOphtalmologie des Quinze Vingts | Amar N.,Center Hospitalier National dOphtalmologie des Quinze Vingts | Gheck L.,Center Hospitalier National dOphtalmologie des Quinze Vingts | And 3 more authors.
Journal Francais d'Ophtalmologie | Year: 2010

Introduction: Ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN) is the most common conjunctival and limbic malignant tumor that could resemble a pterygium in the early phase of the disease. Case report: We report the case of a woman who presented with a limbic tumor of the left eye that was mistakenly diagnosed as a pterygium. An in vivo confocal microscopy examination using the HRTII Rostock Cornea Module and a surgical biopsy were performed. The in vivo confocal microscopy findings and the slit lamp examination showed characteristics that strongly supported the diagnosis of OSSN, and the histological examination of both biopsy and surgical exeresis (exenteration) confirmed the diagnosis of epidermoid carcinoma. Conclusion: This case report underlines the value of in vivo confocal microscopy in the diagnosis of OSSN, particularly epidermoid carcinoma. This device could be helpful for the early differential diagnosis with pterygium. © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved. Source


Ghoubay-Benallaoua D.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | Sandali O.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | Goldschmidt P.,Laboratoire du Center Hospitalier National dOphtalmologie des Quinze Vingts | Borderie V.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research
PLoS ONE | Year: 2013

The aims of this study were to determine whether human limbal explant cultures without feeder cells result in expansion of epithelial progenitors and to estimate the optimal expansion time for progenitor cells. Limbal explants from ten human corneas were cultured for 7, 9, 11, 14, 18, and 21 days. Limbal explants from two corneas were enzymatically dissociated or directly cultured for 14 days. Progenitor cells were characterized by their ability to form colonies, by immunocytochemistry, and by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Colonies were identified after 9, 11, 14, and 18 days of culture, but not after 21 days. The number of colonies per explant was significantly higher after 14 days than after 9 and 21 days. The mean percentage of seeded cells giving rise to clones was 4.03% after 14 days of culture and 0.36% for non-cultured dissociated limbal epithelial cells. The number of cells giving rise to clones per cornea significantly increased from an average of 2275 for non-cultured cells to 24266 for cells cultured for 14 days. Immunocytochemical analysis detected positive staining for cytokeratin (CK) 3, CK5/6/8/10/13/18, CK19, vimentin, p63, and p63α, in both cultures and clones. CK3 expression increased significantly with culture time. Transcript expression was observed for CK3, CK19, vimentin, and Delta N p63α at each culture time point, both in cultures and clones. The optimal culture time for limbal explants in cholera toxin-free Green medium without feeder cells was 14 days leading to the expansion of progenitors. © 2013 Ghoubay-Benallaoua et al. Source


Lelievre L.,Center dInfectiologie Necker Pasteur | Borderie V.,Center Hospitalier National dOphtalmologie des Quinze Vingts | Garcia-Hermoso D.,Institute Pasteur Paris | Brignier A.C.,Service dhematologie | And 4 more authors.
American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene | Year: 2015

A 30-year-old woman with a history of contact lens wear and exposure to swimming pool water in Thailand presented with a non-responsive, progressive corneal ulcer of the right eye. Confocal microscopy evidenced septate linear branching structures, raising suspicion of fungal keratitis. She was promptly treated with topical antibiotics and both topical and intravenous caspofungin plus voriconazole. Worsening of the clinical picture after 1 month of intensive medical therapy led to a large therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty being performed. Corneal cultures grew a mold-like organism, which was identified by sequencing as Pythium insidiosum, an aquatic oomycete. After 4 years of follow-up, the graft exhibits no infection relapse, but graft transparency has been lost after two rejection episodes. Keratoplasty combined with antifungal treatment may offer a cure to P. insidiosum keratitis, although long-term preservation of corneal transparency is difficult to obtain. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. Source


Goldschmidt P.,Laboratoire du Center Hospitalier National dOphtalmologie des Quinze Vingts | Degorge S.,Laboratoire du Center Hospitalier National dOphtalmologie des Quinze Vingts | Benallaoua D.,Laboratoire du Center Hospitalier National dOphtalmologie des Quinze Vingts | Batellier L.,Laboratoire du Center Hospitalier National dOphtalmologie des Quinze Vingts | And 2 more authors.
Diagnostic Microbiology and Infectious Disease | Year: 2012

Diagnosis of Acanthamoeba by microscopic examination, culture, and polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) has several limitations (sensitivity, specificity, lack of detection of several strains, cost of testing for discrimination among strains). We developed a new high-resolution melting real-time PCR (HRM) to detect and characterize Acanthamoeba infections. HRM performances were evaluated with strains from the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) and with 20 corneal scrapings. The DNA extracted from specimens were amplified, detected, and characterized in 1 run using 2 original primers diluted in a solution containing an intercalating dye. Detection and molecular characterization of Acanthamoeba infections could be achieved in less than 2.5 h with a dramatic reduction in cost of reactants (postamplification procedures and radioactive or fluorescent-labeled molecular probes were unnecessary). HRM detection limits were 0.1 cyst/μL or less (including genotypes T5 and T11), and its sensitivity and specificity were higher than other molecular tests. For the tested strains from the ATCC, the HRM drafted 4 different profiles: Type I (genotypes T2 and T4), Type II (T5 and T7), Type III (T8), and Type IV (T1, T3, T6, T9, T11, T12, and T13). © 2012 Elsevier Inc. Source


Goldschmidt P.,Laboratoire du Center Hospitalier National dOphtalmologie des Quinze Vingts | Bensaid P.,Ophtalmo Sans Frontieres | Semoun O.,Laboratoire du Center Hospitalier National dOphtalmologie des Quinze Vingts | Chaumeil C.,Laboratoire du Center Hospitalier National dOphtalmologie des Quinze Vingts
Journal Francais d'Ophtalmologie | Year: 2013

Due to the need for treatment guidelines for endophthalmitis in impoverished areas, we have formulated an approach which takes into account pharmacokinetic data, keeping in mind that, whether oral or intramuscular, antibiotics must achieve therapeutic intraocular levels, antibiotic susceptibility of the most common pathogens in endophthalmitis, and routine availability of bioequivalent generics in the areas in question. In this work, we present the basic guidelines for the management of postoperative endophthalmitis by ophthalmology services in impoverished areas. © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. Source

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