Entity

Time filter

Source Type


Adam V.,Laboratoire Dhydrologie Et Of Geochimie Of Strasbourg Eost Uds | Adam V.,French Environment and Energy Management Agency | Loyaux-Lawniczak S.,Laboratoire Dhydrologie Et Of Geochimie Of Strasbourg Eost Uds | Labille J.,Aix - Marseille University | And 5 more authors.
Journal of Nanoparticle Research | Year: 2016

Abstract: The purpose of this study was to determine and understand the aggregation behaviour of industrial nanoparticulate TiO2 (NPs) in the river water near a TiO2 production plant. The aggregation was tested in near-reality conditions with industrial NPs and the filtered river water in which they are potentially released. The initial size of TiO2 NPs is around 5 nm. The evolution of the hydrodynamic diameters of the TiO2 aggregates in the presence of added Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA) and illite in the filtered river water was measured at pH 8 for at least 30 min with dynamic light scattering and laser diffraction. The experiments performed in the filtered river water allowed the determination of the attachment efficiency coefficients, and the experiments performed under conditions facilitating aggregation (with higher Ca2+ content) were used to understand the potential aggregation processes. When no Ca2+ was added into the river water, the initially aggregated TiO2 did not develop a secondary aggregation in the presence of SRFA and illite. Upon the addition of 2.75 mM Ca2+, TiO2 was shown to heteroaggregate with illite at all tested concentrations. Consequently, in the studied river, the fate of the TiO2 NPs does not seem to be related to that of the clay suspended particles upstream of the plant. However, the behaviours of the TiO2 NPs and the clays are closely linked in the water with higher salt content, which is the case downstream of one of the industrial effluent release points. Graphical Abstract: [Figure not available: see fulltext.] © 2016, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht. Source


Adam V.,Laboratoire Dhydrologie Et Of Geochimie Of Strasbourg Eost Uds | Adam V.,French Environment and Energy Management Agency | Loyaux-Lawniczak S.,Laboratoire Dhydrologie Et Of Geochimie Of Strasbourg Eost Uds | Quaranta G.,Laboratoire Dhydrologie Et Of Geochimie Of Strasbourg Eost Uds
Environmental Science and Pollution Research | Year: 2015

For the last 10 years, engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) have raised interest to industrials due to their properties. They are present in a large variety of products from cosmetics to building materials through food additives, and their value on the market was estimated to reach $3 trillion in 2014 (Technology Strategy Board 2009). TiO2 NMs represent the second most important part of ENMs production worldwide (550–5500 t/year). However, a gap of knowledge remains regarding the fate and the effects of these, and consequently, impact and risk assessments are challenging. This is due to difficulties in not only characterizing NMs but also in selecting the NM properties which could contribute most to ecotoxicity and human toxicity. Characterizing NMs should thus rely on various analytical techniques in order to evaluate several properties and to crosscheck the results. The aims of this review are to understand the fate and effects of TiO2 NMs in water, sediment, and soil and to determine which of their properties need to be characterized, to assess the analytical techniques available for their characterization, and to discuss the integration of specific properties in the Life Cycle Assessment and Risk Assessment calculations. This study underlines the need to take into account nano-specific properties in the modeling of their fate and effects. Among them, crystallinity, size, aggregation state, surface area, and particle number are most significant. This highlights the need for adapting ecotoxicological studies to NP-specific properties via new methods of measurement and new metrics for ecotoxicity thresholds. © 2015, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Source

Discover hidden collaborations