Laboratoire Detudes Et Of Recherches En Pathologie Animale Et Zoonoses Lerpaz

Maisons-Alfort, France

Laboratoire Detudes Et Of Recherches En Pathologie Animale Et Zoonoses Lerpaz

Maisons-Alfort, France
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Moutou F.,Laboratoire Detudes Et Of Recherches En Pathologie Animale Et Zoonoses Lerpaz | Pastoret P.-P.,University Paris Est Creteil
OIE Revue Scientifique et Technique | Year: 2010

The definition of an invasive species will depend on the viewpoint of the observer, who in some cases may be responsible for introducing the species. History has taught us that humans are the species that has invaded the largest surface area of the planet. So, before going on to propose a few definitions, this article describes three different examples or types of example in which domestic animal species, wild animal species and microorganisms (for biological pest control) have been transported intentionally. By doing so, this paper uses a variety of situations to support the definitions. A contemporary argument would counter a strictly biogeographical definition with a more ecological definition. The two are probably complementary. In any case, these definitions should remain practical. The consequences of species movements vary. However, their health impacts should not be underestimated.


Moutou F.,Laboratoire Detudes Et Of Recherches En Pathologie Animale Et Zoonoses Lerpaz | Pastoret P.-P.,University Paris Est Creteil
OIE Revue Scientifique et Technique | Year: 2010

Our understanding of the history of animal domestication has been built on regular input from archaeozoology. This fast-expanding discipline uses increasingly sophisticated and specialised tools to enhance our knowledge of phenomena dating back, for the oldest species, to the Neolithic Revolution. This article takes three examples, those of the domestic dog, domestic goat and European rabbit, to illustrate the history of three different domestication processes using the contemporary means available. In each of the three cases, the authors define the location of original domestication, analyse the principal routes of species movements following domestication, discuss the possible reasons for domestication and suggest a few likely epidemiological impacts.


Moutou F.,Laboratoire Detudes Et Of Recherches En Pathologie Animale Et Zoonoses Lerpaz | Pastoret P.-P.,University Paris Est Creteil
OIE Revue Scientifique et Technique | Year: 2010

Although they are frequently lumped together, reptiles and amphibians belong to two very different zoological groups. Nevertheless, one fact is clear: while numerous reptile and amphibian species on Earth are in decline, others have taken advantage of trade or human movements to become established in new lands, adopting different, and sometimes unusual, strategies. The authors have taken a few examples from these two zoological groups that illustrate the majority of cases. A brief analysis of the causes and effects of their introductions into new areas reveals connections with economic interests, trade in companion animals, medical research and public health.


Moutou F.,Laboratoire Detudes Et Of Recherches En Pathologie Animale Et Zoonoses Lerpaz | Pastoret P.-P.,University Paris Est Creteil
OIE Revue Scientifique et Technique | Year: 2010

Even though people have owned a wide variety of companion animals since times of old, the modern craze for increasingly exotic and little-known species raises a number of questions, including some of an ethical nature. While trade in exotic animals is certainly profitable for those who practise it, it poses great risks of varying types: ecological risks, threats to biodiversity conservation and health risks. Several introduced animal populations have gone on to establish a line in their new host country. We are just starting to measure the adverse impact this has had, in some cases on a very large scale. The veterinary profession doubtless has a major role to play in endeavouring to reform this trade in living creatures that unfortunately results in many losses.


Moutou F.,Laboratoire Detudes Et Of Recherches En Pathologie Animale Et Zoonoses Lerpaz | Pastoret P.-P.,University Paris Est Creteil
OIE Revue Scientifique et Technique | Year: 2010

Every region of the world is concerned by potential mammal invasions, as humans are already present on all the world's land masses. All these invasions are a result of species introductions by humans for one reason or another. The authors briefly review the known movements and observed consequences of mammal-related invasions. They take examples from all five continents, as well as from a few island systems. The ancient introduction of game species, and later of domestic species, has been followed more recently by movements of commercial species. We are now seeing the emergence of what are known as entertainment species. In a number of cases, such introductions have led to the establishment of new epidemiological cycles that previously might never have been thought possible. According to current indicators, this phenomenon is not on the wane.


Moutou F.,Laboratoire Detudes Et Of Recherches En Pathologie Animale Et Zoonoses Lerpaz
Revue scientifique et technique (International Office of Epizootics) | Year: 2010

Although they are frequently lumped together, reptiles and amphibians belong to two very different zoological groups. Nevertheless, one fact is clear: while numerous reptile and amphibian species on Earth are in decline, others have taken advantage of trade or human movements to become established in new lands, adopting different, and sometimes unusual, strategies. The authors have taken a few examples from these two zoological groups that illustrate the majority of cases. A brief analysis of the causes and effects of their introductions into new areas reveals connections with economic interests, trade in companion animals, medical research and public health.


Moutou F.,Laboratoire Detudes Et Of Recherches En Pathologie Animale Et Zoonoses Lerpaz
Revue scientifique et technique (International Office of Epizootics) | Year: 2010

Every region of the world is concerned by potential mammal invasions, as humans are already present on all the world's land masses. All these invasions are a result of species introductions by humans for one reason or another. The authors briefly review the known movements and observed consequences of mammal-related invasions. They take examples from all five continents, as well as from a few island systems. The ancient introduction of game species, and later of domestic species, has been followed more recently by movements of commercial species. We are now seeing the emergence of what are known as entertainment species. In a number of cases, such introductions have led to the establishment of new epidemiological cycles that previously might never have been thought possible. According to current indicators, this phenomenon is not on the wane.

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