Laboratoire Central dHematologie

Port-Saint-Louis-du-Rhône, France

Laboratoire Central dHematologie

Port-Saint-Louis-du-Rhône, France
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Bruzzoni-Giovanelli H.,University Paris Diderot | Bruzzoni-Giovanelli H.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | Gonzalez J.R.,Institute Municipal dInvestigacio Medica IMIM | Gonzalez J.R.,CIBER ISCIII | And 9 more authors.
Oncotarget | Year: 2015

Little is known about inherited factors associated with the risk of developing chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). We used a dedicated DNA chip containing 16 561 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) covering 1 916 candidate genes to analyze 437 CML patients and 1 144 healthy control individuals. Single SNP association analysis identified 139 SNPs that passed multiple comparisons (1% false discovery rate). The HDAC9, AVEN, SEMA3C, IKBKB, GSTA3, RIPK1 and FGF2 genes were each represented by three SNPs, the PSM family by four SNPs and the SLC15A1 gene by six. Haplotype analysis showed that certain combinations of rare alleles of these genes increased the risk of developing CML by more than two or three-fold. A classification tree model identified five SNPs belonging to the genes PSMB10, TNFRSF10D, PSMB2, PPARD and CYP26B1, which were associated with CML predisposition. A CML-risk-allele score was created using these five SNPs. This score was accurate for discriminating CML status (AUC: 0.61, 95%CI: 0.58-0.64). Interestingly, the score was associated with age at diagnosis and the average number of risk alleles was significantly higher in younger patients. The risk-allele score showed the same distribution in the general population (HapMap CEU samples) as in our control individuals and was associated with differential gene expression patterns of two genes (VAPA and TDRKH). In conclusion, we describe haplotypes and a genetic score that are significantly associated with a predisposition to develop CML. The SNPs identified will also serve to drive fundamental research on the putative role of these genes in CML development.


PubMed | University of Lille Nord de France, French Institute of Health and Medical Research, University of Versailles, University Paris Diderot and Laboratoire Central dHematologie
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Oncotarget | Year: 2015

Little is known about inherited factors associated with the risk of developing chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). We used a dedicated DNA chip containing 16 561 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) covering 1 916 candidate genes to analyze 437 CML patients and 1 144 healthy control individuals. Single SNP association analysis identified 139 SNPs that passed multiple comparisons (1% false discovery rate). The HDAC9, AVEN, SEMA3C, IKBKB, GSTA3, RIPK1 and FGF2 genes were each represented by three SNPs, the PSM family by four SNPs and the SLC15A1 gene by six. Haplotype analysis showed that certain combinations of rare alleles of these genes increased the risk of developing CML by more than two or three-fold. A classification tree model identified five SNPs belonging to the genes PSMB10, TNFRSF10D, PSMB2, PPARD and CYP26B1, which were associated with CML predisposition. A CML-risk-allele score was created using these five SNPs. This score was accurate for discriminating CML status (AUC: 0.61, 95%CI: 0.58-0.64). Interestingly, the score was associated with age at diagnosis and the average number of risk alleles was significantly higher in younger patients. The risk-allele score showed the same distribution in the general population (HapMap CEU samples) as in our control individuals and was associated with differential gene expression patterns of two genes (VAPA and TDRKH). In conclusion, we describe haplotypes and a genetic score that are significantly associated with a predisposition to develop CML. The SNPs identified will also serve to drive fundamental research on the putative role of these genes in CML development.


Flatt J.F.,Bristol Institute for Transfusion science | Guizouarn H.,Institut Universitaire de France | Burton N.M.,Bristol Institute for Transfusion science | Burton N.M.,University of Bristol | And 10 more authors.
Blood | Year: 2011

The hereditary stomatocytoses are a series of dominantly inherited hemolytic anemias in which the permeability of the erythrocyte membrane to monovalent cations is pathologically increased. The causative mutations for some forms of hereditary stomatocytosis have been found in the transporter protein genes, RHAG and SLC4A1. Glucose transporter 1 (glut1) deficiency syndromes (glut1DSs) result from mutations in SLC2A1, encoding glut1. Glut1 is the main glucose transporter in the mammalian blood-brain barrier, and glut1DSs are manifested by an array of neurologic symptoms. We have previously reported 2 cases of stomatindeficient cryohydrocytosis (sdCHC), a rare form of stomatocytosis associated with a cold-induced cation leak, hemolytic anemia, and hepatosplenomegaly but also with cataracts, seizures, mental retardation, and movement disorder. We now show that sdCHC is associated with mutations in SLC2A1 that cause both loss of glucose transport and a cation leak, as shown by expression studies in Xenopus oocytes. On the basis of a 3-dimensional model of glut1, we propose potential mechanisms underlying the phenotypes of the 2 mutations found.We investigated the loss of stomatin during erythropoiesis and find this occurs during reticulocyte maturation and involves endocytosis. The molecular basis of the glut1DS, paroxysmal exercise-induced dyskinesia, and sdCHC phenotypes are compared and discussed. © 2011 by The American Society of Hematology.


PubMed | CEA Fontenay-aux-roses, Unite de cytogenetique hematologique, Laboratoire central dhematologie, Aix - Marseille University and 3 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Annales de biologie clinique | Year: 2016

Cytogenetic analyses (karyotype and, if necessary, appropriate complementary FISH analyses) are mandatory at diagnosis in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) as their results are taken into account in therapeutic protocols due to their diagnostic and prognostic values. In some cases, karyotype can be completed by other techniques (RT-PCR, RQ-PCR, DNA content, SNP-array, MLPA) that can be equally or more informative than FISH. Here, we have tempted to establish guidelines concerning karyotype and FISH analyses according to the most recent data of the litterature which is reviewed here, completing the 2008 WHO classification with the recent new cytogenomic entities such as Ph-like ALL and indicating possible therapeutic implications.


Reimann C.,University of Paris Descartes | Reimann C.,Albert Ludwigs University of Freiburg | Six E.,University of Paris Descartes | Dal-Cortivo L.,AP HP | And 11 more authors.
Stem Cells | Year: 2012

Slow T-cell reconstitution is a major clinical concern after transplantation of cord blood (CB)-derived hematopoietic stem cells. Adoptive transfer of in vitro-generated T-cell progenitors has emerged as a promising strategy for promoting de novo thymopoiesis and thus accelerating T-cell reconstitution. Here, we describe the development of a new culture system based on the immobilized Notch ligand Delta-like-4 (DL-4). Culture of human CD34 + CB cells in this new DL-4 system enabled the in vitro generation of large amounts of T-cell progenitor cells that (a) displayed the phenotypic and molecular signatures of early thymic progenitors and (b) had high T lymphopoietic potential. When transferred into NOD/SCID/γc-/- (NSG) mice, DL-4 primed T-cell progenitors migrated to the thymus and developed into functional, mature, polyclonal αβ T cells that subsequently left the thymus and accelerated T-cell reconstitution. T-cell reconstitution was even faster and more robust when ex vivo-manipulated and nonmanipulated CB samples were simultaneously injected into NSG mice (i.e., a situation reminiscent of the double CB transplant setting). This work provides further evidence of the ability of in vitro-generated human T-cell progenitors to accelerate T-cell reconstitution and also introduces a feeder-cell-free culture technique with the potential for rapid, safe transfer to a clinical setting. © AlphaMed Press.


Rea D.,Paris West University Nanterre La Défense | Etienne G.,Institute Bergonie | Nicolini F.,Service dHematologie Clinique | Cony-Makhoul P.,Service dHematologie | And 10 more authors.
Leukemia | Year: 2012

Imatinib mesylate is the sole BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor approved as first-line treatment of accelerated-phase (AP) chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Indication was based on the STI571 0109 study, in which imatinib favorably compared to historical treatments in patients failing prior therapies. The relevance of these results to currently newly diagnosed AP-CML patients remains unknown. We evaluated the benefit of imatinib in 42 newly diagnosed AP-CML patients. In all, 16 patients had hematological acceleration without chromosomal abnormalities in addition to the Philadelphia chromosome (ACAs; HEM-AP), 16 solely had ACAs (ACA-AP) and 10 had hematological acceleration plus ACAs (HEM-APACA). Major cytogenetic responses were achieved in 93.7% of HEM-AP patients, 75% of patients with ACA-AP (PNS) and 40% of patients with HEM-AP+ACA (P=0.0053). The 24-month failure-free survival rate was 87.5% in HEM-AP patients, 43.8% in ACA-AP patients and 15% in HEM-AP+ACA patients (P=0.022). The 24-month estimate of progression-free survival was 100% in HEM-AP patients, 92.8% in ACA-AP patients and 58.3% in HEM-APACA patients (P=0.0052). In conclusion, frontline imatinib allows favorable outcomes in HEM-AP and ACA-AP patients but appears insufficient for patients with HEM-AP+ACA. Broader-target and/or more potent BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitors alone or in combination may be considered in this setting. © 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited.


Bret C.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | Bret C.,Laboratoire Central dHematologie | Bret C.,Montpellier University | Moreaux J.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | And 5 more authors.
Journal of Translational Medicine | Year: 2011

Background: The sulfation pattern of heparan sulfate chains influences signaling events mediated by heparan sulfate proteoglycans located on cell surface. SULF1 and SULF2 are two endosulfatases able to cleave specific 6-O sulfate groups within the heparan chains. Their action can modulate signaling processes, many of which with key relevance for cancer development and expansion. SULF1 has been associated with tumor suppressor effects in various models of cancer, whereas SULF2 dysregulation was in relation with protumorigenic actions. However, other observations argue for contradictory effects of these sulfatases in cancer, suggesting the complexity of their action in the tumor microenvironment.Methods: We compared the expression of the genes encoding SULF1, SULF2 and heparan sulfate proteoglycans in a large panel of cancer samples to their normal tissue counterparts using publicly available gene expression data, including the data obtained from two cohorts of newly-diagnosed multiple myeloma patients, the Oncomine Cancer Microarray database, the Amazonia data base and the ITTACA database. We also analysed prognosis data in relation with these databases.Results: We demonstrated that SULF2 expression in primary multiple myeloma cells was associated with a poor prognosis in two independent large cohorts of patients. It remained an independent predictor when considered together with conventional multiple myeloma prognosis factors. Besides, we observed an over-representation of SULF2 gene expression in skin cancer, colorectal carcinoma, testicular teratoma and liver cancer compared to their normal tissue counterpart. We found that SULF2 was significantly over-expressed in high grade uveal melanoma compared to low grade and in patients presenting colorectal carcinoma compared to benign colon adenoma.We observed that, in addition to previous observations, SULF1 gene expression was increased in T prolymphocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia and in renal carcinoma compared to corresponding normal tissues. Furthermore, we found that high SULF1 expression was associated with a poor prognosis in lung adenocarcinoma.Finally, SULF1 and SULF2 were simultaneously overexpressed in 6 cancer types: brain, breast, head and neck, renal, skin and testicular cancers.Conclusions: SULF1 and SULF2 are overexpressed in various human cancer types and can be associated to progression and prognosis. Targeting SULF1 and/or SULF2 could be interesting strategies to develop novel cancer therapies. © 2011 Bret et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Delord M.,University Paris Diderot | Philippe Rousselot,University of Versailles | Jean Michel Cayuela,Laboratoire Central dHematologie | Jean Michel Cayuela,University Paris Diderot | And 13 more authors.
Oncotarget | Year: 2013

Pharmacogenetic studies in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) typically use a candidate gene approach. In an alternative strategy, we analyzed the impact of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in drug transporter genes on the molecular response to imatinib, using a DNA chip containing 857 SNPs covering 94 drug transporter genes. Two cohorts of CML patients treated with imatinib were evaluated: an exploratory cohort including 105 patients treated at 400 mg/d and a validation cohort including patients sampled from the 400 mg/d and 600 mg/d arms of the prospective SPIRIT trial (n=239). Twelve SNPs discriminating patients according to cumulative incidence of major molecular response (CI-MMR) were identifi ed within the exploratory cohort. Three of them, all located within the ABCG2 gene, were validated in patients included in the 400 mg/d arm of the SPIRIT trial. We identifi ed an ABCG2 haplotype (defi ne as G-G, rs12505410 and rs2725252) as associated with signifi cantly higher CI-MMR in patients treated at 400 mg/d. Interestingly, we found that patients carrying this ABCG2 "favorable" haplotype in the 400 mg arm reached similar CI-MMR rates thatpatients randomized in the imatinib 600 mg/d arm. Our results suggest that response to imatinib may be infl uenced by constitutive haplotypes in drug transporter genes. Lower response rates associated with "non- favorable" ABCG2 haplotypes may be overcome by increasing the imatinib daily dose up to 600 mg/d.


PubMed | Institute Paoli Calmettes, CEA Fontenay-aux-roses, Sanguine, Laboratoire central dhematologie and 2 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Annales de biologie clinique | Year: 2016

The karyotype is critical for the evaluation of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) at diagnosis. Cytogenetic abnormalities detected in AML are one of the most powerful independent prognostic factors. It impacts on the choice of treatment in clinical trials. All chromosomes can be targeted, common chromosomal abnormalities are recurrent and may be associated with a cytological well-defined type. In 40% of the cases, the karyotype is normal and must be associated with molecular biology studies that can refine the prognosis. The usefulness of the karyotype is more limited during the follow-up of the patient due to its limited sensitivity, but it is still useful in the clinical management of relapse. Since 2001, the WHO (World Health Organization) classification of hematological malignancies integrates cytogenetic data in the classification of AML. Karyotype is therefore mandatory in the diagnosis of AML.


Moreau C.,University of Paris Descartes | Bajolle F.,University of Paris Descartes | Siguret V.,AP HP | Siguret V.,University of Paris Descartes | And 8 more authors.
Blood | Year: 2012

Managing vitamin K antagonist (VKA) therapy is challenging in children because of a narrow therapeutic range and wide inter- and intra-individual variability in dose response. Only a few small studies have investigated the effect of nongenetic and genetic factors on the dose response to VKAs in children. In a cohort study including 118 children (median age 9 years; range, 3 months-18 years) mostly with cardiac disease, we evaluated by multivariate analysis the relative contribution of nongenetic factors and VKORC1/ CYP2C9/CYP4F2 genotypes on warfarin (n = 83) or fluindione (n = 35) maintenance dose and the influence of these factors on the time spent within/above/ below the range. The results showed that height, target international normalized ratio and VKORC1 and CYP2C9 genotypes were the main determinants of warfarin dose requirement, accounting for 48.1%, 4.4%, 18.2%, and 2.0% of variability, respectively, and explaining 69.7% of the variability. Our model predicted the warfarin dose within 7 mg/wk in 86.7% of patients. None of the covariates was associated with the time spent above or below the international normalized ratio range. Whether this model predicts accurately the effective maintenance dose is currently being investigated. © 2012 by The American Society of Hematology.

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