L Boltzmann Institute For Leukemia Research

Austria

L Boltzmann Institute For Leukemia Research

Austria

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Schanz J.,University of Gottingen | Tuchler H.,L Boltzmann Institute for Leukemia Research | Sole F.,Institute Of Recerca Contra La Leucemia Josep Carreras | Mallo M.,Institute Of Recerca Contra La Leucemia Josep Carreras | And 21 more authors.
Leukemia | Year: 2013

Monosomal karyotype (MK) is associated with an adverse prognosis in patients in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). This study analyzes the prognostic impact of MK in a cohort of primary, untreated patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). A total of 431 patients were extracted from an international database. To analyze whether MK is an independent prognostic marker in MDS, cytogenetic and clinical data were explored in uni- and multivariate models regarding overall survival (OS) as well as AML-free survival. In all, 204/431 (47.3%) patients with MK were identified. Regarding OS, MK was prognostically significant in patients with ≤4 abnormalities only. In highly complex karyotypes (≥5 abnormalities), MK did not separate prognostic subgroups (median OS 4.9 months in MK+ vs 5.6 months in patients without MK, P=0.832). Based on the number of abnormalities, MK-positive karyotypes (MK+) split into different prognostic subgroups (MK+ and 2 abnormalities: OS 13.4 months, MK+ and 3 abnormalities: 8.0 months, MK+ and 4 abnormalities: 7.9 months and MK+ and ≥5 abnormalities: 4.9 months; P<0.01). In multivariate analyses, MK was not an independent prognostic factor. Our data support the hypothesis that a high number of complex abnormalities, associated with an instable clone, define the subgroup with the worst prognosis in MDS, independent of MK. © 2013 Macmillan Publishers Limited All rights reserved.


Pfeilstocker M.,Hanusch Hospital | Tuechler H.,L Boltzmann Institute For Leukemia Research | Sanz G.,Hospital Universitario La Paz | Schanz J.,University of Gottingen | And 30 more authors.
Blood | Year: 2016

In myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs), the evolution of risk for disease progression or death has not been systematically investigated despite being crucial for correct interpretation of prognostic risk scores. In a multicenter retrospective study, we described changes in risk over time, the consequences for basal prognostic scores, and their potential clinical implications. Major MDS prognostic risk scoring systems and their constituent individual predictors were analyzed in 7212 primary untreated MDS patients from the International Working Group for Prognosis in MDS database. Changes in risk of mortality and of leukemic transformation over time from diagnosis were described. Hazards regarding mortality and acute myeloid leukemia transformation diminished over time from diagnosis in higher-risk MDS patients, whereas they remained stable in lower-risk patients. After approximately 3.5 years, hazards in the separate risk groups became similar and were essentially equivalent after 5 years. This fact led to loss of prognostic power of different scoring systems considered, which was more pronounced for survival. Inclusion of age resulted in increased initial prognostic power for survival and less attenuation in hazards. If needed for practicability in clinical management, the differing development of risks suggested a reasonable division into lower- and higher-risk MDS based on the IPSS-R at a cutoff of 3.5 points. Our data regarding time-dependent performance of prognostic scores reflect the disparate change of risks in MDS subpopulations. Lower-risk patients at diagnosis remain lower risk whereas initially high-risk patients demonstrate decreasing risk over time. This change of risk should be considered in clinical decision making. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.


PubMed | Hospital Universitario La Paz, University of Houston, Stanford University, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf and 23 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Blood | Year: 2016

In myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs), the evolution of risk for disease progression or death has not been systematically investigated despite being crucial for correct interpretation of prognostic risk scores. In a multicenter retrospective study, we described changes in risk over time, the consequences for basal prognostic scores, and their potential clinical implications. Major MDS prognostic risk scoring systems and their constituent individual predictors were analyzed in 7212 primary untreated MDS patients from the International Working Group for Prognosis in MDS database. Changes in risk of mortality and of leukemic transformation over time from diagnosis were described. Hazards regarding mortality and acute myeloid leukemia transformation diminished over time from diagnosis in higher-risk MDS patients, whereas they remained stable in lower-risk patients. After approximately 3.5 years, hazards in the separate risk groups became similar and were essentially equivalent after 5 years. This fact led to loss of prognostic power of different scoring systems considered, which was more pronounced for survival. Inclusion of age resulted in increased initial prognostic power for survival and less attenuation in hazards. If needed for practicability in clinical management, the differing development of risks suggested a reasonable division into lower- and higher-risk MDS based on the IPSS-R at a cutoff of 3.5 points. Our data regarding time-dependent performance of prognostic scores reflect the disparate change of risks in MDS subpopulations. Lower-risk patients at diagnosis remain lower risk whereas initially high-risk patients demonstrate decreasing risk over time. This change of risk should be considered in clinical decision making.


Schanz J.,University of Gottingen | Tuchler H.,L Boltzmann Institute For Leukemia Research | Sole F.,Hospital del Mar | Mallo M.,Hospital del Mar | And 24 more authors.
Journal of Clinical Oncology | Year: 2012

Purpose: The karyotype is a strong independent prognostic factor in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Since the implementation of the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) in 1997, knowledge concerning the prognostic impact of abnormalities has increased substantially. The present study proposes a new and comprehensive cytogenetic scoring system based on an international data collection of 2,902 patients. Patients and Methods: Patients were included from the German-Austrian MDS Study Group (n = 1,193), the International MDS Risk Analysis Workshop (n = 816), the Spanish Hematological Cytogenetics Working Group (n = 849), and the International Working Group on MDS Cytogenetics (n = 44) databases. Patients with primary MDS and oligoblastic acute myeloid leukemia (AML) after MDS treated with supportive care only were evaluated for overall survival (OS) and AML evolution. Internal validation by bootstrap analysis and external validation in an independent patient cohort were performed to confirm the results. Results: In total, 19 cytogenetic categories were defined, providing clear prognostic classification in 91% of all patients. The abnormalities were classified into five prognostic subgroups (P < .001): very good (median OS, 61 months; hazard ratio [HR], 0.5; n = 81); good (49 months; HR, 1.0 [reference category]; n = 1,809); intermediate (26 months; HR, 1.6; n = 529); poor (16 months; HR, 2.6; n = 148); and very poor (6 months; HR, 4.2; n = 187). The internal and external validations confirmed the results of the score. Conclusion: In conclusion, these data should contribute to the ongoing efforts to update the IPSS by refining the cytogenetic risk categories. © 2012 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

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