Masan, South Korea
Masan, South Korea

Kyungnam University is a private university located in Changwon , the capital city of Gyeongsangnam-do, South Gyeongsang or Gyeongnam province, in Southeastern South Korea. Kyungnam University has six colleges . Its 15 research institutions work to facilitate not only individual research but also cooperative partnership activities with academia, industry, and government. The university also has 65 sister universities in 19 different countries. The university sees itself as a model regional university of the 21st century, with specialization in globalization and localization under the university's motto of 'truth, freedom, and creation'. With the university motto as its guideline, its educational goal is to produce well-educated professionals, community leaders and true world citizens by guiding students in their discovery and formation of ideas about humanity, nature, society, culture, and scientific theory and its application. Wikipedia.

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News Article | April 29, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

People watch a TV broadcasting of a news report on North Korea's missile launch, at a railway station in Seoul, South Korea, April 29, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji SEOUL (Reuters) - North Korea test-fired a ballistic missile on Saturday shortly after U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson warned that failure to curb Pyongyang's nuclear and ballistic missile programs could lead to "catastrophic consequences". U.S. and South Korean officials said the test, from an area north of the North Korean capital, appeared to have failed, in what would be the North's fourth straight unsuccessful missile test since March. The test came as the USS Carl Vinson aircraft carrier group arrived in waters near the Korean peninsula, where it began exercises with the South Korean navy on Saturday, about 12 hours after the failed launch, a South Korean navy official said. Tillerson, in a U.N. Security Council meeting on North Korea on Friday, repeated the Trump administration's position that all options were on the table if Pyongyang persisted with its nuclear and missile development. U.S. President Donald Trump, asked about his message to North Korea after the test, told reporters: "You'll soon find out" but did not elaborate on what the U.S. response would be. Separately, in excerpts of an interview with CBS News released on Saturday, Trump said the United States and China would "not be happy" with a nuclear test but gave no other details. Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi told the U.N. meeting it was not only up to China to solve the North Korean problem. "The key to solving the nuclear issue on the peninsula does not lie in the hands of the Chinese side," Wang said. In a commentary on Saturday, China's official Xinhua news agency said both North Korea and the United States needed to tread cautiously. "If both sides fail to make such necessary concessions, then not only will the two countries, but the whole region and the whole world end up paying a heavy price for a possible confrontation." Trump, in an interview with Reuters on Thursday, praised Chinese leader Xi Jinping for "trying very hard" on North Korea but warned a "major, major conflict" was possible. The North has been conducting missile and nuclear weapons related activities at an unprecedented rate and is believed to have made progress in developing intermediate-range and submarine-launched missiles. Tension on the Korean peninsula has been high for weeks over fears the North may conduct a long-range missile test, or its sixth nuclear test, around the time of the April 15 anniversary of its state founder's birth. Pope Francis, speaking to reporters, called for another country to mediate the dispute between Pyongyang and Washington, saying the world risked a devastating war. Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe condemned the test as a grave threat to the international order. "I urged Russia to play a constructive role in dealing with North Korea," Abe told reporters in London. "Japan is watching how China will act in regard to North Korea." U.S. officials, speaking on condition of anonymity, said the North Koreans had probably tested a medium-range missile known as a KN-17 and it appeared to have broken up within minutes of taking off. The South Korean military said the missile reached an altitude of 71 km (44 miles) before disintegrating. It said the launch was a clear violation of U.N. resolutions and warned the North not to act rashly. With North Korea acting in defiance of the pressure, the United States could conduct new naval drills and deploy more ships and aircraft in the region, a U.S. official told Reuters. The dispatch of Carl Vinson to the waters off the Korean peninsula is a "reckless action of the war maniacs aimed at an extremely dangerous nuclear war," the Rodong Sinmun, the official newspaper of North Korea's ruling Workers' Party, said in a commentary on Saturday. Inter-continental ballistic rockets will fly into the United States "if the U.S. shows any slight sign of provocation," the newspaper said. Kim Dong-yub, an expert at Kyungnam University's Institute of Far Eastern Studies in Seoul, said North Korea might have got the data it wanted with the missile's short flight, then blown it up in a bid to limit the anger of China, which warned Pyongyang against further provocation. North Korea rattled world powers in February when it successfully launched a new intermediate-range ballistic missile that it said could carry a nuclear weapon. It also successfully tested ballistic missiles on March 6. It is not clear what has caused the series of failed missile tests since then. The Trump administration could respond to the test by speeding up its plans for new U.S. sanctions, including possible measures against specific North Korean and Chinese entities, said the U.S. official, who declined to be identified. "Something that's ready to go could be taken from the larger package and expedited," said the official. France also condemned the test and called for a firm reaction. The U.N. Security Council is likely to start discussing a statement to condemn the missile launch, said diplomats.  But condemnations and sanctions resolutions since 2006, when North Korea conducted its first nuclear test, have done little to impede its push for ballistic missiles and nuclear arms. The South Korean politician expected to win a May 9 presidential election, Moon Jae-in, called the test an "exercise in futility". "We urge again the Kim Jong Un regime to immediately stop reckless provocative acts and choose the path to cooperate with the international community," Park Kwang-on, a spokesman for Moon, said in a statement, referring to the North Korean leader. Moon has advocated a more moderate policy on the North and been critical of the deployment of an advanced U.S. missile defense system in the South intended to counter North Korea's missile threat, which China also strongly objects to.


News Article | April 28, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

SEOUL/UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) - North Korea unsuccessfully test-fired a ballistic missile on Saturday from a region north of its capital, Pyongyang, South Korea's military said, defying intense pressure from the United States and the reclusive state's main ally, China. The test came as U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson warned the United Nations Security Council that failure to curb North Korea's nuclear and ballistic missile programs could lead to 'catastrophic consequences'. U.S. and South Korean officials said the test appeared to have failed, in what would be a fourth successive unsuccessful missile test since March. U.S. officials, speaking on condition of anonymity, said the missile was probably a medium-range missile known as a KN-17 and appears to have broken up within minutes of taking off. Tension had spiked on the Korean peninsula over concerns the North may conduct the test-launch of a long-range missile or its sixth nuclear test around the time of the April 15 anniversary of its state founder's birth or the day marking the founding of its military earlier this week. The timing of the latest launch suggests it was calculated to send a certain message as Pyongyang remains under intense attention of world powers, said Kim Dong-yub, an expert at Kyungnam University's Institute of Far Eastern Studies in Seoul. “It was planned at a complicated timing around the end of the South Korea-U.S. joint military drills, the United States talking about military options and the announcement of North Korea policies and the Security Council meeting,” Kim said. South Korean and U.S. forces have been conducting annual military drills since the start of March that conclude at the end of April. In a show of force, the United States is sending the USS Carl Vinson aircraft carrier group to waters off the Korean peninsula, where it will join the USS Michigan, a nuclear submarine that docked in South Korea on Tuesday. U.S. President Donald Trump told Reuters in an interview on Thursday a "major, major conflict" with North Korea was possible over its nuclear and ballistic missile programs. Trump praised Chinese leader Xi Jinping for "trying very hard" to rein in Pyongyang. But both China and Russia rebuked Washington's threat of military force at a meeting of the U.N. Security Council on the matter on Friday. Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi told the 15-member council it was not only up to China to solve the North Korean problem. "The key to solving the nuclear issue on the peninsula does not lie in the hands of the Chinese side," Wang told the council in blunt remarks that Tillerson later rebuffed. The U.N. Security Council is likely to start discussing a statement to condemn the missile launch, said diplomats, adding that it was unlikely to be issued on Friday. The Security Council traditionally condemns all missile launches by Pyongyang. "It could have happened today exactly because we had the meeting," Italian U.N. Ambassador Sebastiano Cardi, chair of the Security Council's North Korean sanctions committee, told reporters when hearing of the test. "It's illegal, it should not be done, it's another provocative action by North Korea.” Neighboring Japan said the "unacceptable" launch clearly violated U.N. resolutions and said it had lodged a strong protest with North Korea.


A Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) interceptor (R) is seen in Seongju, South Korea, April 26, 2017. Picture taken April 26, 2017. Lee Jong-hyeon/News1 via REUTERS SEOUL (Reuters) - U.S. President Donald Trump's suggestion that South Korea could pay for an advanced U.S. missile defense system could test the strength of the alliance between Seoul and Washington at a time of rising tensions with North Korea, analysts said on Friday. In an exclusive interview, Trump told Reuters on Thursday that he wants South Korea to pay for the $1 billion Terminal High Altitude Area Defence (THAAD) system. The remarks come as South Korea heads into a presidential election that will likely elect liberal front-runner Moon Jae-in, who has said the next administration in Seoul should have the final say on the deployment of THAAD. Moon's campaign office said the deployment of THAAD should be immediately suspended until then. "This almost certainly will become another self-inflicted wound for the alliance and for U.S. foreign policy," said Daniel Pinkston, a Troy University professor and expert on North and South Korea based in Seoul. Moon, who said in a book published in January that South Korea should learn to "say no to Americans", is leading polls by a wide margin ahead of South Korea's May 9 election to replace impeached former President Park Geun-hye, whose government agreed with Washington last year to deploy THAAD. If elected, Moon would end nearly a decade of conservative rule in South Korea, which has regarded the alliance with the United States dating back to the 1950-53 Korean War as a cornerstone of its defense against the threat of North Korea. Moon advocates dialogue with North Korea and has criticized the conservative government and its hawkish stance for failing to stop Pyongyang's weapons development. The Trump administration said on Wednesday it wanted to push North Korea into dismantling its nuclear and missile programs through tougher international sanctions and diplomatic pressure -- but remained open to negotiations to bring that about. Kim Ki-jung, a top foreign policy adviser to Moon, said the suggestion that South Korea pay for the system was an "impossible option". "Even if we purchase THAAD, its main operation would be in the hands of the United States," said Kim. "So purchasing it would be an impossible option."South Korea has never considered buying the system, partly because the cost involved was deemed prohibitive. Some liberal politicians have argued South Korea should develop its own indigenous missile defense system. THAAD's job is to intercept and destroy a ballistic missile in its final phase of flight. A battery comprises four parts: the truck-mounted launcher, eight anti-missile "interceptor" missiles, a radar system and a fire control system connecting it to U.S. military commanders. Seoul said the decision to deploy THAAD was ultimately a military decision taken by the United States. "He's using THAAD as a guinea pig to test the relationship," said Kim Dong-yub, a professor at Kyungnam University's Institute of Far Eastern Studies in Seoul. "Trump seems to be testing South Korea's commitment to the Korea-U.S. alliance. I wonder if Trump's saying this because he already thinks Moon will win," Kim added. In an interview with Reuters, Trump also said he will either renegotiate or terminate what he called a "horrible" free trade deal with South Korea. A second top foreign policy adviser to Moon said Trump's comments about the cost of THAAD poses fundamental questions about where the alliance may be headed. "This is a new dimension," said Chung Eui-yong, a former South Korean ambassador to Geneva who leads a team of foreign policy advisers for Moon. "Our position has been that we should review THAAD even if we are not paying for it, but his comments on the cost have changed the fundamental aspect of this issue," Chung told Reuters. "We will have to choose what is best for our national interests." The U.S. military started deploying THAAD in early March, despite strong opposition from China, which says the system's radar can be used to spy into its territory. The deployment also sparked protests from residents in Seonjgu in the southeast, where the system is being deployed, and prompted a North Korean warning of retaliation. China has imposed some restrictions on South Korean companies in China, which many in South Korea perceive as retaliation for deployment of the missile system.


News Article | April 20, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

FILE - In this April 7, 2017, file photo, U.S. President Donald Trump gestures as he and Chinese President Xi Jinping walk together after their meetings at Mar-a-Lago in Palm Beach, Fla. After decades of failure to stop North Korea’s march toward a nuclear arsenal, some see Trump’s bluster as a shrewd attempt to press China, the North’s most important ally and trading partner, into pressuring North Korea more aggressively over its nuclear program. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File) Many South Koreans are using those words to describe the president of their most important ally, rather than the leader of their archrival to the North. They worry that President Donald Trump's tough, unorthodox talk about North Korea's nuclear program is boosting already-high animosity between the Koreas. No matter whether Trump succeeds at getting North Korea to abandon its nuclear weapons and missile programs, his actions, comments and tweets are changing how the region views the long-running conflict. Senior North Korean officials see their relations with Washington as even more volatile than before. China is appealing for calm, and possibly re-examining its role. Japan is weighing a retaliatory strike capability against the North. After decades of failure to stop North Korea's march toward a nuclear arsenal, some see Trump's bluster as a shrewd attempt to press China, the North's most important ally and trading partner, into pressuring North Korea more aggressively over its nuclear program. Trump has said he's willing to make trade and economic concessions to China in return for its help with North Korea. "A trade deal with the U.S. will be far better for them if they solve the North Korean problem!" Trump said on Twitter, recounting what he told Xi while hosting him this month at his Palm Beach, Florida, resort. Pulling back from a campaign promise, Trump has also said he would not declare China a currency manipulator, as he looked for help from Beijing. The rhetoric seems to be blurring the lines between North Korea and economic ties with China, issues that previous U.S. administrations had kept separate. If such persuasion falls short, Trump has suggested he might use more coercive methods. So-called secondary sanctions on Chinese banks that do business with North Korea could also be in the offing, officials have said. "Trump is posing a hard choice to Beijing — do something, something about North Korea and hope it generates some effects, or face American economic retaliation," said Dean Cheng, senior research fellow at the Heritage Foundation in Washington, D.C. "Whether that works or not, it's a very different strategy from the last three presidents." Koh Yu-hwan, a North Korea expert at Seoul's Dongguk University, said that the way U.S. officials describe "maximum pressure and engagement" suggests that the Trump administration wants to ease Chinese fears about a collapse in North Korea, something that prevented Beijing from aggressively pressuring the North in the past. "If the United States and China can set the tone, there will also be more opportunities for dialogue. It seems Trump could be more willing to cut a deal with North Korea than Obama was," Koh said. South Koreans may be uneasy about North Korea's expanding arsenal of weapons, but many doubt that the country's leader, Kim Jong Un, wants to start a war that would likely end in the destruction of his government and the ruling elite. Donald Trump is another story, judging by widespread concern posted on Twitter. Some see him as a hot-tempered, unpredictable leader who might attack North Korea before it masters the technology to build a nuclear-tipped missile that could hit the U.S. mainland. North Korea is moving steadily toward that goal, and some experts believe it could achieve it during Trump's presidency. U.S. strikes earlier this month against Syria, coupled with Trump's dispatching of what he called an "armada" of U.S. warships to the Korean region, touched off fears that the United States was preparing for military action, though it was revealed this week that the flotilla was taking a roundabout path to Korean waters and has yet to arrive. Lim Eul Chul, a North Korea expert at South Korea's Kyungnam University, doesn't think Trump wants to attack North Korea but said he appears eager to send a message that war is possible. That has driven North Korea to issue its own threats and begin preparations for "even a 1 percent chance that the U.S. will launch pre-emptive strikes," Lim said. "That's just how the authoritarian Kim government survives." The Kyunghyang Shinmun newspaper said recently that Trump is playing a "dangerous card" with his verbal threats, risking a miscalculation by Pyongyang and a war on the peninsula. "Trump seems capable of doing anything, and he might choose to strike the North before it's technologically able to strike back," said Ray Kim, a 39-year-old Seoul resident. "Even if a war breaks out, it's not like that war will take place on U.S. soil. Trump has much less to lose." Trump is clearly on the mind of the North Korean leadership. A senior Foreign Ministry official told The Associated Press last week that Pyongyang has been watching Trump's actions — including his recent order for the strike on a Syrian air base and his many tweets about North Korea — and determined that his administration is "more vicious and more aggressive" than that of his predecessor, Barack Obama. In response, Pyongyang is promising it will continue to build up its "nuclear deterrent" and respond in kind to any hostile moves, perceived or real. North Korean fury at Washington was rising well before Trump took office, in particular over reports that annual U.S.-South Korean military exercises now include training for precision strikes on the North's leadership or nuclear and military facilities. Pyongyang's regime has called that "a red line," and has since begun its own training for pre-emptive strikes and speeded up its testing of nuclear weapons and long-range missiles. Japan is drawing up emergency responses in case of a North Korea missile strike. A number of municipalities are testing community alarm systems and planning evacuation drills as concerns run high around U.S. military bases. Both Japan and South Korea are home to tens of thousands of U.S. troops. The rising tension has opened the door to debate about once-taboo subjects in Japan, where the disastrous World War II experience and a postwar constitution that renounced the right to use military force have created a strong pacifist streak. Japan's ruling party recently urged the government to introduce advanced missile-defense equipment such as a land-based Aegis or Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) system, which is being introduced in South Korea. Ruling party defense experts have even proposed that Japan lift a self-imposed restraint on conducting a retaliatory strike if attacked, rather than relying solely on the U.S. military. The steady turning up of the heat on all sides has increased the possibility of a miscalculation that could result in an incident that escalates too quickly to be contained, or even outright conflict. Associated Press Writers Eric Talmadge in Pyongyang, North Korea; Christopher Bodeen in Beijing; Mari Yamaguchi in Tokyo and Hyung-jin Kim in Seoul, South Korea, contributed to this story.


SEOUL (Reuters) - North Korea's successful missile test-launch signals major advances in developing an intercontinental ballistic missile, such as mastery of re-entry technology and better engine performance key to targeting the United States, experts say. The isolated country has been developing a long-range missile capable of striking the mainland United States mounted with a nuclear warhead. That would require a flight of 8,000 km (4,800 miles) or more and technology to ensure a warhead's stable re-entry into the atmosphere. The North's official KCNA news agency said the new strategic ballistic missile named Hwasong-12, fired on Sunday at the highest angle to avoid affecting neighboring countries' security, flew 787 km (489 miles) on a trajectory reaching an altitude of 2,111.5 km (1,312 miles). The details reported by KCNA were largely consistent with South Korean and Japanese assessments that it flew further and higher than an intermediate-range missile (IRBM) tested in February from the same region, northwest of Pyongyang. Such an altitude meant it was launched at a high trajectory, which would limit the lateral distance traveled. But if it was fired at a standard trajectory, it would have a range of at least 4,000 km (2,500 miles), experts said. The test "represents a level of performance never before seen from a North Korean missile", John Schilling, an aerospace expert, said in an analysis on the U.S.-based 38 North website. "It appears to have not only demonstrated an intermediate-range ballistic missile (IRBM) that might enable them to reliably strike the U.S. base at Guam, but more importantly, may represent a substantial advance to developing an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM)." KCNA said the test launch verified the homing feature of the warhead that allowed it to survive "under the worst re-entry situation" and accurately detonate. The claim, if true, could mark an advancement in the North's ICBM program exceeding most expectations, said Kim Dong-yub, a professor at Kyungnam University's Institute of Far Eastern Studies in Seoul. Kim, a former South Korean navy officer, added the trajectory showed the North was clearly testing the re-entry technology under flight environments consistent for a ICBM. The North has successfully launched long-range rockets twice to put objects into space. But many had believed it was some years away from mastering re-entry expertise for perfecting an ICBM, which uses similar engineering in early flight stages. Sunday's missile launch also tested the North's capability to carry a "large-size heavy nuclear warhead", the state news agency said. "The test-fire proved to the full all the technical specifications of the rocket ... like guidance and stabilization systems ... and reconfirmed the reliability of new rocket engine under the practical flight circumstances," KCNA said. On Monday, South Korea's military played down the North's claim of technical progress on atmospheric re-entry, saying the possibility was low. North Korea's official Rodong Sinmun newspaper devoted half of its six-page Monday edition to coverage of the missile test, with vivid color photographs of the launch and jubilant leader Kim celebrating with military officers. The pictures featured a long nose-coned projectile that appeared to be similar to missiles displayed during an April 15 military parade for the birth anniversary of state founder Kim Il Sung, the current leader's grandfather. The nose cone resembles that of the KN-08 ICBM the North is believed to be developing, and the lofted trajectory tests re-entry by putting the missile through extra stress, said Joshua Pollack of the U.S.-based Nonproliferation Review. "This is an advanced missile, if their claims are true," he said. KCNA said Kim accused the United States of "browbeating" countries that "have no nukes", warning Washington not to misjudge the reality that its mainland was in the North's "sighting range for strike". North Korea, which is banned by UN resolutions from engaging in nuclear and missile developments, has accused the United States of a hostile policy to crush its regime, calling its nuclear weapons a "sacred sword" to protect itself. The North's leader, Kim, has said it was in final stages of developing an ICBM.


News Article | May 21, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

SEOUL (Reuters) - North Korea fired a ballistic missile into waters off its east coast on Sunday, its second missile test in a week, which South Korea said dashed the hopes of the South's new liberal government for peace between the neighbors. A South Korean military official said the missile appeared to be an upgraded, extended-range version of the North's solid-fuel submarine-launched missile. The missile fired a week ago flew was liquid-fueled, and flew further. North Korea has defied all calls to rein in its nuclear and missile programs, even from China, its lone major ally, saying the weapons are needed for legitimate self-defense. The reclusive state has been working to develop a nuclear-tipped missile capable of striking the U.S. mainland. On Saturday, it said it had developed the capability to strike the U.S. mainland, although Western missile experts say the claim is exaggerated. The United Nations Security Council is due to meet on Tuesday behind closed doors to discuss the latest test at the request of the United States, Japan and South Korea, diplomats said on Sunday. An official traveling with U.S. President Donald Trump in Saudi Arabia said the White House was aware of the latest launch and noted that the missile had a shorter range than the three previous missiles that North Korea had tested. U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said economic and diplomatic pressure would continue to be applied to North Korea. "The ongoing testing is disappointing, disturbing and we ask that they cease that," he said in an interview with "Fox News Sunday". The two missile tests in a week complicate plans by South Korea's new President Moon Jae-in to seek ways to reduce tension on the peninsula. Moon took office eleven days ago after winning an election on a platform of a more moderate approach to the North, with which the South is still technically at war since no peace treaty was signed at the end of their 1950-1953 conflict. South Korea's foreign ministry said the tests were "reckless and irresponsible actions throwing cold water over the hopes and desires of this new government and the international community for denuclearization and peace on the Korean peninsula". Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said the latest missile test by the reclusive North was "a snub and a challenge to international efforts for a peaceful resolution". Abe told reporters after a meeting of Japan's National Security Council that he wanted to raise the issue of North Korean missile launches at the Group of Seven leaders' summit in Italy this month. China had no immediate comment. Kim Dong-yub, a military expert at Kyungnam University's Institute for Far Eastern Studies in Seoul, said the North appeared to be testing and perfecting both solid and liquid-fueled missiles, which might help explain why the pace of its tests had increased. "I think the team to develop liquid fuel missiles are being pitted against the solid fuel team," Kim said. "The liquid fuel team succeeded on May 14 so the solid fuel team went for another round to achieve success. That is why the speed of North Korea's missile development is going beyond imagination." Sunday's missile was launched at 0759 GMT (3:59 a.m. ET) from a location near Pukchang, 60 km (36 miles) northeast of the capital Pyongyang, an area where North Korea attempted to test-launch another missile last month but failed, South Korea's Office of Joint Chiefs of Staff said in a statement. The missile flew about 500 km (310 miles), it said. Japan's Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga said the missile landed outside Japan's exclusive economic zone and no damage to ships or airplanes was reported. "The flight range was 500 km and South Korea and the United States are closely analyzing additional information," South Korea's Joint Chiefs of Staff said. On Saturday, North Korea's KCNA state news agency said in a commentary: "The U.S. mainland and the Pacific operational theater are within the strike range of the DPRK and the DPRK has all kinds of powerful means for annihilating retaliatory strike." North Korea's full name is the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK).


North Korean leader Kim Jong Un reacts with members of the Korean People's Army in this undated photo released by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) on May 15, 2017. KCNA via REUTERS SEOUL (Reuters) - North Korea's successful missile test-launch signals major advances in developing an intercontinental ballistic missile, such as mastery of re-entry technology and better engine performance key to targeting the United States, experts say. The isolated country has been developing a long-range missile capable of striking the mainland United States mounted with a nuclear warhead. That would require a flight of 8,000 km (4,800 miles) or more and technology to ensure a warhead's stable re-entry into the atmosphere. The North's official KCNA news agency said the new strategic ballistic missile named Hwasong-12, fired on Sunday at the highest angle to avoid affecting neighboring countries' security, flew 787 km (489 miles) on a trajectory reaching an altitude of 2,111.5 km (1,312 miles). The details reported by KCNA were largely consistent with South Korean and Japanese assessments that it flew further and higher than an intermediate-range missile (IRBM) tested in February from the same region, northwest of Pyongyang. Such an altitude meant it was launched at a high trajectory, which would limit the lateral distance traveled. But if it was fired at a standard trajectory, it would have a range of at least 4,000 km (2,500 miles), experts said. The test "represents a level of performance never before seen from a North Korean missile", John Schilling, an aerospace expert, said in an analysis on the U.S.-based 38 North website. "It appears to have not only demonstrated an intermediate-range ballistic missile (IRBM) that might enable them to reliably strike the U.S. base at Guam, but more importantly, may represent a substantial advance to developing an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM)." KCNA said the test launch verified the homing feature of the warhead that allowed it to survive "under the worst re-entry situation" and accurately detonate. The claim, if true, could mark an advancement in the North's ICBM program exceeding most expectations, said Kim Dong-yub, a professor at Kyungnam University's Institute of Far Eastern Studies in Seoul. Kim, a former South Korean navy officer, added the trajectory showed the North was clearly testing the re-entry technology under flight environments consistent for a ICBM. The North has successfully launched long-range rockets twice to put objects into space. But many had believed it was some years away from mastering re-entry expertise for perfecting an ICBM, which uses similar engineering in early flight stages. Sunday's missile launch also tested the North's capability to carry a "large-size heavy nuclear warhead", the state news agency said. "The test-fire proved to the full all the technical specifications of the rocket ... like guidance and stabilization systems ... and reconfirmed the reliability of new rocket engine under the practical flight circumstances," KCNA said. On Monday, South Korea's military played down the North's claim of technical progress on atmospheric re-entry, saying the possibility was low. North Korea's official Rodong Sinmun newspaper devoted half of its six-page Monday edition to coverage of the missile test, with vivid color photographs of the launch and jubilant leader Kim celebrating with military officers. The pictures featured a long nose-coned projectile that appeared to be similar to missiles displayed during an April 15 military parade for the birth anniversary of state founder Kim Il Sung, the current leader's grandfather. The nose cone resembles that of the KN-08 ICBM the North is believed to be developing, and the lofted trajectory tests re-entry by putting the missile through extra stress, said Joshua Pollack of the U.S.-based Nonproliferation Review. "This is an advanced missile, if their claims are true," he said. KCNA said Kim accused the United States of "browbeating" countries that "have no nukes", warning Washington not to misjudge the reality that its mainland was in the North's "sighting range for strike". North Korea, which is banned by UN resolutions from engaging in nuclear and missile developments, has accused the United States of a hostile policy to crush its regime, calling its nuclear weapons a "sacred sword" to protect itself. The North's leader, Kim, has said it was in final stages of developing an ICBM.


News Article | May 14, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

SEOUL/WASHINGTON (Reuters) - North Korea, defying calls to rein in its weapons program, fired a ballistic missile that landed in the sea near Russia on Sunday, days after a new leader came to power in South Korea pledging to engage Pyongyang in dialogue. The U.S. military's Pacific Command said it was assessing the type of missile that was fired but it was "not consistent with an intercontinental ballistic missile". The U.S. threat assessment has not changed from a national security standpoint, a U.S. official said. Japanese Defense Minister Tomomi Inada said the missile could be a new type. It flew for 30 minutes before dropping into the sea between North Korea's east coast and Japan. North Korea has consistently test-fired missiles in that direction. A U.S. official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said the missile landed 97 km (60 miles) south of Russia's Vladivostok region. U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley called the launch a message by Pyongyang to South Korea after the election of President Moon Jae-in, who took office on Wednesday. "You first have to get into Kim Jong Un's head - which is, he's in a state of paranoia, he's incredibly concerned about anything and everything around him," Haley told ABC's "This Week" program, referring to North Korea's leader. Haley added that the United States will "continue to tighten the screws," referring to sanctions and working with the international community to put pressure on Pyongyang. The White House mentioned Russia in its earlier statement about the launch. "With the missile impacting so close to Russian soil – in fact, closer to Russia than to Japan – the President cannot imagine that Russia is pleased," the White House said, referring to U.S. President Donald Trump. The launch served as a call for all nations to implement stronger sanctions against North Korea, it added. The missile flew 700 km (430 miles) and reached an altitude of more than 2,000 km (1,245 miles), according to officials in South Korea and Japan, further and higher than an intermediate-range missile North Korea successfully tested in February from the same region of Kusong, northwest of its capital, Pyongyang. An intercontinental ballistic missile is considered to have a range of more than 6,000 km (3,700 miles). North Korea is widely believed to be developing an intercontinental missile tipped with a nuclear weapon that is capable of reaching the United States. Trump has vowed not to let that happen. Experts said the altitude reached by the missile tested on Sunday meant it was launched at a high trajectory, which would limit the lateral distance it traveled. But if it was fired at a standard trajectory, it would have a range of at least 4,000 km (2,500 miles), experts said. Kim Dong-yub of Kyungnam University's Institute of Far Eastern Studies in Seoul said he estimated a standard trajectory would give it a range of 6,000 km (3,700 miles). "The launch may indeed represent a new missile with a long range," said Jonathan McDowell of the Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, referring to the estimated altitude of more than 2,000 km (1,240 miles). "It is definitely concerning." Speaking in Beijing, Dmitry Peskov, Russian President Vladimir Putin's spokesman, told reporters Putin and Chinese President Xi Jinping had discussed the situation on the Korean peninsula, including the latest missile launch, and expressed "mutual concerns" about growing tensions. Putin is in Beijing for a conference on a plan for a new Silk Road. Delegations from the United States, South Korea and North Korea are also there. The launch, at 5:27 a.m. Seoul time (2027 GMT Saturday), came two weeks after North Korea fired a missile that disintegrated minutes into flight, marking its fourth consecutive failure since March. South Korea's new president Moon held his first National Security Council in response to the launch, which he called a "clear violation" of U.N. Security Council resolutions, his office said. "The president said while South Korea remains open to the possibility of dialogue with North Korea, it is only possible when the North shows a change in attitude," Yoon Young-chan, Moon's press secretary, told a briefing. Moon won Tuesday's election on a platform of a moderate approach to North Korea and has said he would be willing to go to Pyongyang under the right circumstances, arguing dialogue must be used in parallel with sanctions.


Patent
Korea Water Resources Corporation, Hanyang University and Kyungnam University | Date: 2014-03-31

Provided is a separation membrane for seawater desalination and a method for manufacturing the same, and more particularly, a separation membrane for seawater desalination with excellent water permeability and salt rejection and a method for manufacturing the same. If the separation membrane for seawater desalination and the method for manufacturing the same according to the present disclosure are applied, it is possible to provide a separation membrane for seawater desalination with excellent water permeability and salt rejection. Therefore, it is possible to provide a separation membrane for seawater desalination with improved performance in comparison to an existing separation membrane for seawater desalination. As a result, water resources may be widely utilized.


Patent
Kyungnam University | Date: 2012-06-18

An axial flux synchronous generator for wind turbine generators is provided including a shaft coupled to receive power with a power generating apparatus for the wind turbine; a rotor coupled rotatably to the shaft and having upper and lower disk-like faces affixed with a plurality of skewed permanent magnets having north-south (N-S) pole pairs and distantly arranged; an upper stator and a lower stator both having a plurality of slots formed similar to the skewed permanent magnets for taking windings of a coil, the upper stator being displaced relative to the lower stator by an electric angle in the range of 2530; an upper housing and a lower housing for housing the rotor, the upper stator and the lower stator together; and a hub housing for fastening the upper housing and the lower housing to maintain constant gaps between the rotor and the upper stator and the lower stator.

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