Kyoto, Japan

Kyoto University of Foreign Studies , also known as KUFS, is a foreign language university in Kyoto, Japan. Kyoto Junior College of Foreign Languages is attached to this university. KUFS specializes in 8 languages: English, Spanish, French, German, Portuguese, Chinese, Italian, Japanese, and Global Affairs. Wikipedia.


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Nishikawa J.,Kwansei Gakuin University | Kakusho K.,Kwansei Gakuin University | Iiyama M.,Kyoto University | Nishiguchi S.,Osaka Institute of Technology | Murakami M.,Kyoto University of Foreign Studies
Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics) | Year: 2015

We propose to estimate the position of each student in a classroom by observing the classroom with a camera attached on the notebook or tablet PC of the lecturer. The position of each student in the classroom is useful to keep observing his/her learning behavior as well as taking attendance, continuously during the lecture. Although there are many previous works on estimating positions of humans from camera images in the field of computer vision, the arrangement of humans in a classroom is quite different from usual scenes. Since students in a classroom sit on closely-spaced seats, they appear with many overlaps among their regions in camera images. To cope with this difficulty, we keep observing students to capture their faces once they appear, and recover the positions in the classroom with the geometric constraint that requires those positions to be distributed on the same plane parallel to the floor. © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015.


Kishi M.,Meiji University | Konno T.,Mejiro University | Murakami M.,Kyoto University of Foreign Studies
Proceedings of the 21st International Conference on Computers in Education, ICCE 2013 | Year: 2013

In this research, the authors attempted to clarify how mobile devices are best utilized in overseas fieldwork in higher education to enhance reflective learning, especially in developing countries where wireless connectivity is NOT stable. Mobile devices can be used to promote reflective learning in fieldwork from the following two aspects, (1) to promote personalized and collaborative reflective learning and (2) to help students create conceptual perspectives based on the data collected from various resources such as field notes. However, in many cases, students do fieldwork where wireless connectivity is NOT stable. Students may develop skills to use mobile devices effectively to reflect upon their learning and develop conceptual perspectives about another culture.


Ishikawa Y.,Kyoto University of Foreign Studies | Smith C.,Kyoto University of Foreign Studies | Kondo M.,Tezukayamagakuin University | Akano I.,Kyoto University of Foreign Studies | And 2 more authors.
Proceedings of the IADIS International Conference Mobile Learning 2013, ML 2013 | Year: 2013

This paper reports on the use of an English-language reading practice application for an android tablet computer operating system with students who are not native speakers of English. The application materials for vocabulary learning in reading-passage contexts were created to include words from a database of low-frequency and technical noun-verb collocations which occurred frequently in certain documents related to the study of international affairs: Thirty Englishlanguage annual reports of United Nations organizations found on official websites; and English-language annual reports and other articles from the websites of twenty international non-governmental organizations. The learning materials were used in an English for specific purposes course intended to support the reading skill development of students studying international affairs at a university in Japan. Research showed that use of the learning materials had three positive influences on students' study behavior: The students' reading speed increased without a loss in comprehension; the students reported that they enjoyed the reading practice with the mobile tablet computer; and they appreciated that it had some merits that differed from reading practice in hard copy formats that may help improve reading skills. © 2013 IADIS.


Nomura M.,Kyoto University | Hatada A.,Kyoto University | Hatada A.,Kyoto University of Foreign Studies | Itioka T.,Kyoto University
Plant Ecology | Year: 2011

We measured variation in the intensities of ant and non-ant anti-herbivore defences amongst ten Macaranga species in Sarawak, Malaysia. Intensities of non-ant defences were estimated by measuring effects of fresh leaves (provided as food) of these Macaranga species on survival of common cutworm larvae [Spodoptera litura (Fabricius), Lepidoptera: Noctuidae]. Intensities of ant defences were estimated by measuring ant aggressiveness in the presence of artificial damage inflicted on plants. As part of our examination of non-ant defences, we measured leaf toughness (punch strength, by penetrometry), and the contents of total phenols and condensed tannin. We demonstrated interspecific variation in intensities of both ant and non-ant defences amongst ten Macaranga species and showed that the rank order of ant defence intensity was negatively correlated with the intensity of non-ant defence. We also found that the balance between ant and non-ant defence intensity was correlated with the rates of leaf turnover and shoot growth. Species investing more in ant defence tended to have higher leaf turnover rates. Macaranga species that occur preferentially in shadier microhabitats had lower leaf turnover rates, suggesting that non-ant defences are more cost-effective in more shade-tolerant species. Our results also suggest that the total intensity of non-ant defences is positively correlated with both leaf toughness and total phenol content. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.


Ishikawa Y.,Kyoto University of Foreign Studies | Akahane-Yamada R.,ATR Intelligent Robotics and Communication Laboratories | Kitamura M.,ATR Intelligent Robotics and Communication Laboratories | Smith C.,Kyoto University of Foreign Studies | And 2 more authors.
Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics) | Year: 2014

This paper is a report on a research project which was conducted on blended learning (BL) in an English as a foreign language (EFL) course at a Japanese university. In this study the BL approach to EFL teaching was defined as a combination of in-class and outside-of-class learning tasks and materials integrated in a single learning environment by a www-based courseware, ATR CALL BRIX (http://www.atr-lt.jp/products/brix/index.html). The use of the courseware outside of class was intended not only to help improve students' TOEIC scores, but also to nurture self-regulated learning (SRL). A student self-evaluation system was implemented in this project. On the basis of the findings of pre- and post-learning questionnaires and interviews with students, it was concluded that the self-evaluation system encouraged students to engage in SRL. Furthermore, pre- and post-TOEIC testing revealed that the students in the project improved their TOEIC scores (p < .01; r = .49). © 2014 Springer International Publishing.


Murakami M.,Kyoto University of Foreign Studies | Nakamata N.,Kyoto University of Foreign Studies | Nakanishi K.,Kyoto University of Foreign Studies | Yui K.,Kyoto University of Foreign Studies
Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics) | Year: 2011

In this report, we introduce the Japanese teacher training program at Kyoto University of Foreign Studies. We explain our SNS platform which contributes to the program's success and "Working Room" which support the communication among students and teachers. We think that the combination SNS with "Working Room" is very effective for making community. Students can post a variety of information on the SNS, such as self-descriptions, blogs, BBS entries, and reports of practice teaching. They can share information on Japanese teaching and communicate with teachers and other students. As an additional advantage, they can treat the SNS as a daily journal reflecting their teaching training progress. Students come to "Working Room" with some purposes such as prepareing trial lessons. Some freshman can see work of senior students in the room, some changes happen gradually; senior students give advice to freshman students; freshman students read others' diary and write comment in SNS. © 2011 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Kondo M.,Osaka University | Ishikawa Y.,Kyoto University of Foreign Studies | Smith C.,Kyoto University of Foreign Studies | Sakamoto K.,Kyoto University of Foreign Studies | And 2 more authors.
ReCALL | Year: 2012

This paper reports a project in which researchers at universities in Japan explored the use of Mobile Assisted Language Learning (MALL) practices by developing a learning module intended to help improve students' scores on the TOEIC Listening and Reading Tests. MALL practices are currently being developed at universities in Japan because almost all students have mobile phones, many of them have had informal learning experiences with mobile devices, and students are integrating the communication and information gathering capabilities of mobile technology into their own lifestyles. The private nature of mobile phone communication may create barriers when students are asked to use personal mobile phones for school-centered learning activities. In this study a Nintendo DS mobile was used because it was affordable and students were familiar with this device for game playing and learning activities. In addition, because this device does not have the same telephone, messaging, and Internet functions that have made mobile phones an integral part of students' private lives, a device such as the Nintendo DS may be a neutral mobile platform for the development of MALL activities which could later be adapted and transferred for use on private mobile phones. The primary aim of this study was to discover whether certain MALL practices would foster an advanced form of self-study, self-regulated learning (SRL). In SRL students take responsibility for arousing and sustaining their own motivation in order to make, carry out, and evaluate strategic learning plans. It was concluded that the use of the MALL learning module encouraged study without teacher intervention, i.e., self study, in terms of time spent on learning tasks, levels of satisfaction derived from the tasks, and self-measured achievement. Furthermore, SRL was observed in terms of the specificity of the goals, the customized creation of learning tasks and their in-class applications. © 2012 European Association for Computer Assisted Language Learning.


Kyoto University of Foreign Studies | Entity website

Chancellor and Chair of the Board of Directors MORITA Yoshikazu In the future, it is becoming more and more important for us to not only accept various cultures of the world but also to go out into the world, speaking our own words and communicating with many people. Taking the effort to understand the traditions and culture of our own country as a prerequisite, I encourage you all to continue advancing toward your respective objectives ...


Kyoto University of Foreign Studies | Entity website

Copyright 2014-2016 Kyoto University of Foreign Studies, Kyoto Junior College of Foreign Languages All rights reserved


Kyoto University of Foreign Studies | Entity website

This three-week program is designed for students who wish to improve their proficiency in Japanese language while experiencing Japanese culture in Kyoto, an attractive, historical and academic city

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