Kyoto, Japan

Kyoto Institute of Technology in Kyoto, Japan is a Japanese national university established in 1949. The history of the Institute extends back to two schools, Kyoto Craft High School and Kyoto Sericulture Training School , which were forerunners of the Faculty of Engineering and Design and the Faculty of Textile Science, respectively. The former was moved to Sakyo-ku, Matsugasaki in 1930 and changed its name to Kyoto Industrial High School in 1944. The latter developed into Kyoto Sericulture High School, under direct supervision of the Ministry of Education in 1914, and changed its name to Kyoto Sericulture Technical High School in 1931 and further to Kyoto Technical High School of Sericulture in 1944. The two forerunners merged in 1949, due to educational system revisions, to establish the present School of Science and Technology. Together with Shinshu University and Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, the Institute is one of Japan's three historical centers of textile research.Kyoto Institute of Technology has a campus at Matsugasaki in Sakyō-ku. Another campus is at Saga in Ukyō-ku. Its Japanese nickname is Kōsen . In English it is known as KIT.Beginning in October 2007, graduate course instruction became available in English through the International Program for Science and Technology for specially selected students from the 50 institutions worldwide with KIT Exchange Agreements. Wikipedia.


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Growth factors are fragile molecules which degrade rapidly, resulting in loss of function. PODS™ (POlyhedrin Delivery System) packages growth factor proteins into microcrystals which are able to lock-in the biological activity. The PODS™ microcrystals are very stable, but when exposed to proteases (a type of protein made by cells that chop up other proteins), PODS™ slowly break down and release their growth factor cargo. This unique process is able to provide a constant flow of growth factors over weeks and months from a single application. The microcrystal format also means that PODS™ growth factors can be attached to specific locations on surfaces producing localized effects that are required for the orchestration of tissue and organ development. PODS™ technology was originally developed in the lab of Prof Hajime Mori at the Kyoto Institute of Technology in Japan. It is based on research into the polyhedrin protein which viruses of insects use to protect themselves whilst in the open environment outside their host. PODS™ technology is a clever engineering of this system to replace the virus with any desired cargo protein. Dr Christian Pernstich, research director at Cell Guidance Systems, explains “As with drugs, delivery mechanism for growth factors makes all the difference. Standard growth factors are inflexible, sometimes unreliable and lack durability. PODS™ technology overcomes these limitations in a very elegant way. We have already made some of the most technically challenging growth factors, and demonstrated their biological activity, with more in the pipeline. As well as research applications, we are actively exploring the medical potential of this technology for vaccine production and for delivery of therapeutic proteins. We are aiming to regenerate tissues that have been damaged by diseases such as Multiple Sclerosis, Osteoarthritis and Parkinson’s disease. It is a very promising and exciting technology.” Cell Guidance Systems provides reagents and services to control, manipulate and monitor the cell, both in-vitro and in-vivo. Our technologies enable novel insights for research as well as fresh approaches to treating disease.


A caterpillar commercially bred for use as fishing bait was found to have the ability to biodegrade polyethylene, the most commonly used plastic in manufacturing shopping bags. About 80 million tons of polyethylene are produced annually primarily for use in packaging. Reliance on this plastic raises concern since it will take about 100 years for a low-density polyethylene bag to degrade completely. Denser plastics would take as long as 400 years to disintegrate. A researcher, who also happens to be an amateur beekeeper, accidentally discovered that the wax worm, the larvae of the common insect called Galleria mellonella, or greater wax moth, has the potential to solve current problems with plastic waste, particularly polyethylene. Further investigation revealed it was not the caterpillar's manner of chewing that degrades the plastic. The creature actually produces something that can break down the polymer chains in polyethylene plastic. "Perhaps in its salivary glands or a symbiotic bacteria in its gut. The next steps for us will be to try and identify the molecular processes in this reaction and see if we can isolate the enzyme responsible," said study researcher Paolo Bombelli, of the University of Cambridge. "This discovery could be an important tool for helping to get rid of the polyethylene plastic waste accumulated in landfill sites and oceans." Plastic pollution is a growing problem with at least 275 million tons of this waste being produced annually by 192 nations worldwide. Of these, nearly 8 million tons are washed up into the ocean. The plastic debris in the waters are being blamed for the death of many animals including those that mistake the colorful plastic as food and those caught in plastic fishing lines. The wax worm may offer a promising solution that can help with plastic waste problem but other organisms have also been identified in the past to have the potentials for degrading plastic. Last year, Japanese scientists reported of a new species of bacteria that eats the plastic used in most disposable water bottles. The plastic called polyethylene terephthalate, or PET, can also be found in frozen-dinner trays, blister packaging and polyester clothing. The bacteria species known as Ideonella sakaiensis was found to use two enzymes to break down plastic. Researchers said that a community of Ideonella sakaiensis can break down a thin film of PET over a period of six weeks given a stable temperature of 86 degrees Fahrenheit. "When grown on PET, this strain produces two enzymes capable of hydrolyzing PET and the reaction intermediate, mono(2-hydroxyethyl) terephthalic acid. Both enzymes are required to enzymatically convert PET efficiently into its two environmentally benign monomers, terephthalic acid and ethylene glycol," researcher Shosuke Yoshida of Kyoto Institute of Technology, and colleagues described the bacteria in the journal Science. In 2012, researchers from Yale University discovered a variety of mushroom called Pestalotiopsis microspora that can also break down polyurethane. Two years after its discovery, a system was developed that aims to make it possible to eat these plastic-digesting fungi. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


Patent
Sakai Chemical Industry Co. and Kyoto Institute of Technology | Date: 2015-08-12

A photocatalyst material and a photocatalyst device capable of generating hydrogen from water by radiation of sunlight at high efficiency. The photocatalyst material according to the present invention includes a nitride-based compound semiconductor obtained by replacement of part of Ga and/or Al by a 3d-transition metal. The nitride-based compound semiconductor has one or more impurity bands. A light absorption coefficient of the nitride-based compound semiconductor is 1,000 cm^(1 )or more in an entire wavelength region of 1,500 nm or less and 300 nm or more. Further, the photocatalyst material satisfies the following conditions: the energy level of the bottom of the conduction band is more negative than the redox potential of H^(+)/H_(2); the energy level of the top of the valence band is more positive than the redox potential of O_(2)/H_(2)O; and there is no or little degradation of a material even when the material is irradiated with light underwater.


Patent
Nissha Printing Co. and Kyoto Institute of Technology | Date: 2015-02-12

An insect control sheet containing a Cry polyhedron prepared by fixing an insecticidal protein (a Cry toxin) produced by Bacillus thuringiensis to a polyhedron of polyhedrin protein is provided. The insect control sheet contains the Cry polyhedron and is used by floating on water. The insect control sheet is floatable on water, and includes a pure matrix layer 20 and a toxin-containing matrix layer 30 containing the Cry polyhedron 51 which are layered on the underside of a sheet-shaped first sheet substrate 10. The pure matrix layer 20 is composed of a degradable or water-soluble second material and the toxin-containing matrix layer 30 is composed of a degradable or water-soluble third material and the Cry polyhedron. The toxin-containing matrix layer sustainably releases the Cry polyhedron to the water on which the insect control sheet is floated.


The present invention provides a method for refolding an antibody, a process for producing a refolded antibody, a refolded antibody, and uses thereof. The present invention provides a method for refolding an antibody in a liquid phase, the method comprising the steps of denaturing an inactive antibody binding directly or through a linker to a peptide, the peptide having an isoelectric point lower than the isoelectric point of the inactive antibody, and dispersing in a liquid phase the peptide-binding inactive antibody denatured in the step above. The present invention also provides a process for producing a refolded antibody.


Patent
Kyoto Institute of Technology and Daicel Corporation | Date: 2016-05-18

The problem addressed by the present invention is to provide a novel separating medium for hydrophilic interaction chromatography useful in separating hydrophilic compounds. The hydrophilic interaction chromatography separating medium, which is formed from a support and a ligand carried by the support, is a separating medium wherein the ligand is a (meth)acrylic polymer having a constituent unit derived from the compound indicated by formula (I). (In formula (I): there are one or two double bonds between atoms configuring a heterocycle; X_(1) is selected from the group consisting of S, SCH_(3)^(+), O, NH, NCH_(3), CH_(2), CHR, and CR_(1)R_(2); and X_(2), X_(3), and X_(4) are each selected from the group consisting of N, NH, NCH_(3), CH_(2), CHR, NCH_(3)^(+), CH, CR, and CR_(1)R_(2). ; R_(1) and R_(2) are each a substituted or unsubstituted alkyl having 1-18 carbon atoms, an aryl having 6-18 carbon atoms, an alkenyl having 2-18 carbon atoms, an alkynyl having 2-18 carbon atoms, an aralkyl having 7-18 carbon atoms, an acyl having 2-18 carbon atoms, a cycloalkyl having 3-18 carbon atoms, a carboxyl, an amino, an aryloxy having 6-18 carbon atoms, an alkoxy having 1-18 carbon atoms, a halo, a hydroxy, a nitro, or a cyano. R is a substituted or unsubstituted alkyl having 1-18 carbon atoms, an aryl having 6-18 carbon atoms, an alkenyl having 2-18 carbon atoms, an alkynyl having 2-18 carbon atoms, an aralkyl having 7-18 carbon atoms, an acyl having 2-18 carbon atoms, a cycloalkyl having 3-18 carbon atoms, a carboxyl, an amino, an aryloxy having 6-18 carbon atoms, an alkoxy having 1-18 carbon atoms, a halo, a hydroxy, a nitro, or a cyano. ; At least two of X_(1), X_(2), X_(3), and X_(4) are not CH_(2), CH, CR, or CR_(1)R_(2), and R_(3) is H or CH_(3).)


Patent
Kyoto Institute of Technology | Date: 2014-03-19

This invention provides a novel method for producing a lactide-lactone copolymer. The method is characterized by copolymerizing a lactide and a lactone using a molybdenum compound as a catalyst.


Patent
Kyoto Institute of Technology | Date: 2014-03-20

A complex amplitude information measurement apparatus (10) according to the present invention includes pixel sensor groups for generating a difference from one pixel sensor group to another in the optical distance of object light traveling from a measurement object (100); a camera (15) provided with an image sensor for recording, with a single-shot exposure, the object light that has passed through or been reflected from the pixel sensor groups to obtain intensity information of the measurement object; and a computer (16) for computing, on the basis of the intensity information, phase information of the measurement object (100).


Patent
Kyoto Institute of Technology | Date: 2016-02-17

This invention provides a novel method for producing a lactide-lactone copolymer. The method is characterized by copolymerizing a lactide and a lactone using a molybdenum compound as a catalyst.


Patent
Tsudakoma Corporation and Kyoto Institute of Technology | Date: 2014-10-01

According to the present invention, a carbon-fiber preform for a carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic is formed from mutually intersecting warp and weft each of which including a carbon-fiber multifilament yarn. At least one of layer surfaces has fluff formed by cutting some of filaments of the carbon-fiber multifilament yarn, and a total fluff length of fluff formed on the warp and a total fluff length of fluff formed on the weft are not equal. The present invention provides a CFRP in which the delamination strength (interlaminar shear strength) is improved and that has a high strength.

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