Kwame Nkrumah University Of Science And Technology

www.knust.edu.gh
Kumasi, Ghana

Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology is a University in Kumasi, Ghana. It is the second public university established in the country as well as the second largest University in Ghana. The University has its roots in the plans of the Asantehene Agyeman Prempeh I to establish a University in Kumasi as part of his drive towards modernization of his kingdom. This plan never came to fruition due to the clash between British empire expansion and the desire for King Prempeh I to preserve his kingdom's independence.However, his younger brother and successor, King Agyeman Prempeh II, upon ascending to the Golden Stool in 1935, continued with this vision. Events in the Gold Coast in the 1940s played into his hands. First there was the establishment of the University College of the Gold Coast. Second there were the 1948 riots and the consequent Watson Commission report which recommended that a university of science be established in Kumasi. Thus, in 1949, the dream of the Prempehs became a reality when building started on what was to be called the Kumasi College of Technology.The Kumasi College of Technology offered admission to its first students to the engineering faculty in 1951 , and an Act of Parliament gave the university its legal basis as the Kumasi College of Technology in 1952. The nucleus of the college was formed from 200 teacher training students transferred from Achimota in the Greater Accra Region. The college was affiliated to the University of London. In 1961, the college was granted full university status.The main university campus, which is about seven square miles in area, is about eight miles to the east of Kumasi, the Ashanti Regional capital. Wikipedia.

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Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP-SICA | Phase: HEALTH-2009-4.3.1-2 | Award Amount: 6.02M | Year: 2010

Buruli ulcer disease (BUD), caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, is a neglected bacterial infection of the poor in remote rural areas, mostly affecting children. BUD, the third most common mycobacterial disease in immunocompetent humans after tuberculosis and leprosy, is most endemic in West Africa, but cases have been reported from more than 30 countries. BUD is a mutilating disease leading to severe disability. Treatment with antibiotics is possible but is long-lasting and requires injections, shows treatment failures and drug resistance may occur. A vaccine against M. ulcerans would protect persons at risk in highly endemic areas and could be used as a therapeutic vaccine to shorten duration of treatment and to prevent relapses. The general objective of BuruliVac is to identify and develop novel vaccine candidates suitable for translation into clinical application. This objective will be achieved by a multidisciplinary approach involving among others basic and applied research in immunology, bioinformatics, molecular genetics, tropical medicine, microbiology and clinical bacteriology. As currently no existing vaccine lead candidate is available, the consortium will identify and develop new vaccine candidates of different types, will evaluate them using bioinformatics, applied genomics and proteomics and will subject them to consecutive test systems. For evaluation of vaccine candidates regarding their application in humans, the consortium will also study the immune response and disease immunopathology to define correlates of protection. Essential pre-clinical testing in vitro and in vivo will select a small number of candidates that is amenable to be introduced into clinical studies.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: NMP-2009-2.6-1 | Award Amount: 5.77M | Year: 2010

One of the major challenges of this century is the provision of safe drinking water for a growing population. The shortage in water resources in arid areas requires the availability of more efficient and cheaper drinking water production processes. For groundwater, it is often sufficient to aerate and disinfect to produce drinking water. However, in large parts of the world the use of groundwater from aquifers is not possible due to excessive use and global climate change that allow penetration of salt sea water into the aquifers. Population growth, not surprisingly, leads to more pollution of aquifers rendering the water quality unsuitable for drinking water purposes without excessive treatment. In contrast, there are always large quantities of water vapor present in air. The objective within CapWa is produce a commercially available membrane modular system suitable for industrial applications within 3-4 years. The produced demin water from this system should be competitive with existing demin water technologies. The starting point will be the water vapour selective composite membranes that are developed in the proof of principle project. At the same time fundamental research will also be done on other alternative water selecting coatings. For both of these membrane paths the upscale from lab to industrial scale membrane production will be developed in CapWa. In CapWa the modular membrane system will also be developed and tested in the flue gas duct of a gas and coal-fired power plant, a cooling tower (or geothermal well) and in a paper or board mill. To achieve this goal the selective membranes must be thermal/chemically stable under the existing environmental conditions (50-150 C) and resistant to fouling. To be competitive with existing demin production lines, the construction of the end system must be efficient and user friendly.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP-SICA | Phase: ENV.2009.1.2.1.2 | Award Amount: 4.72M | Year: 2010

One of the most dramatic and immediate impacts of climate variation is that on disease, especially the vector-borne diseases that disproportionally affect the poorest people in Africa. Although we can clearly see that, for example, an El Nino event triggers Rift Valley Fever epidemics, we remain poor at understanding why particular areas are vulnerable and how this will change in coming decades, since climate change is likely to cause entirely new global disease distributions. This applies to most vector borne disease. At the same time, we do not know currently the limit of predictability of the specific climate drivers for vector-borne disease using state-of-the-art seasonal forecast models, and how best to use these to produce skilful infection-rate predictions on seasonal timescales. The QWeCI project thus aims to understand at a more fundamental level the climate drivers of the vector-borne diseases of malaria, Rift Valley Fever, and certain tick-borne diseases, which all have major human and livestock health and economic implications in Africa, in order to assist with their short-term management and make projections of their future likely impacts. QWeCI will develop and test the methods and technology required for an integrated decision support framework for health impacts of climate and weather. Uniquely, QWeCl will bring together the best in world integrated weather/climate forecasting systems with heath impacts modelling and climate change research groups in order to build an end-to-end seamless integration of climate and weather information for the quantification and prediction of climate and weather on health impacts in Africa.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: HEALTH.2010.3.4-3 | Award Amount: 2.23M | Year: 2011

The APARET fellowship programme will catalyse independent research activities of graduates of Field Epidemiology Training Programmes (FETP) and Field Epidemiology Laboratory Training programmes (FELTP) in Africa. APARET fellows will be employed as research associates by African APARET partners for 2 years (salary provided by host institute). During the first year of their contract they will be embedded in the EU-supported APARET programme. A core part of the fellowship will be the application for a major research grant. The APARET programme will consist of: - Workshops: a two-week initiation workshop with face-to face contact between fellow and mentor and workshops on topics such as research funding, project management, ethical issues; a one-week proposal writing and project-planning workshop; a one-week final seminar, where fellows will present their result. - A mentoring programme linking each fellow with a local supervisor and an external mentor providing support for scientific and grant writing activities - Small research grants enabling the fellows to perform independent scientific activities at their host institutes. - Embedding the fellows in a network of African and European epidemiologists APARET can be credited towards a PhD degree of the respective university. EU-funding covers 3 successive cohorts of fellows. APARET will support the fellows in meeting the following objectives: I) Main objective: Prepare, write and submit a proposal for a major research grant. II) Additional objectives: 1. Plan, develop and conduct an epidemiological research project. 2. Perform epidemiological analyses 3. Submit a scientific manuscript to a peer-reviewed journal. 4. Critically review and provide feedback on a scientific paper. 5. Participate in the training of other epidemiologists. APARET supports well-trained epidemiologists in establishing a career in Africa.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: ENV.2009.3.1.3.1 | Award Amount: 1.25M | Year: 2010

Most of African countries are struggling towards development and improving their living conditions. An appropriate waste management structure at a national and regional level is a milestone that must be achieved in order to improve living standards, health and environment. The situation in many countries is that the obvious lack of a functional waste management system brings perennial garbage problems such as inefficient garbage collection, poor public compliance to waste segregation, uncontrolled open burning, and tolerated presence of open dumpsites. Furthermore valuable resources are lost due to inefficient or non-existing recycling systems. The establishment of an efficient waste management and recycling system contributes to enhancing the resource efficiency of these countries and thus supports a sustainable development in the long-term. The present Coordination Action will seek the establishment of Integrated Solid Waste Management systems (ISWM) in Western Africa. ISWM systems combine waste streams, waste collection, treatment and disposal methods, with the objective of achieving environmental benefits, economic optimization and societal acceptability. For the achievement of the project objectives, a solid waste management expert and research co-ordination platform will analyze the current situation in the targeted countries (Ghana, Nigeria, Senegal and Ivory Coast), identifying main gaps and constraints of any type (technological, sociological, organisational, etc.) and selecting suitable management systems. According to the results obtained, including inputs from authorities and policy makers in participatory workshops, the consortium will provide valuable guidelines and recommendations to be used in the future implementation of developed strategies such as National and Regional Action Plans on solid waste management. The project will also build local capacities through workshops and seminars where relevant stakeholders must be involved.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP-SICA | Phase: HEALTH-2009-4.3.1-1 | Award Amount: 6.63M | Year: 2010

Filarial infections remain a major public health problem in West and Central Africa. Three filarial species are involved: Onchocerca volvulus (onchocerciasis or river blindness); Wuchereria bancrofti (lymphatic filariasis); and Loa loa (the eye worm). Treatment of onchocerciasis with ivermectin has been successful in many situations but emergence of drug resistance and risk of severe adverse reactions associated with L loa co-infections is restricting the implementation of mass treatment and consequently alternate approaches to control are required. Studies with animal models have identified the general mechanisms of protective immunity while human studies have drawn attention to immune regulatory processes that influence clinical presentations Together, these observation provide a basis for vaccine development. The next challenge is to identify target antigens and ensure appropriate formulation and delivery to promote protective responses and avoid any pathology. This project aims to: 1, use transciptomics and bioinformatics to identify the parasite molecules that are targets of protective immunity and that may influence the regulation of such responses; and 2, microarray technologies and bioinformatics to determine the pathways that lead to expression of protective immunity. Cohorts of onchocerciasis patients who have received treatment with ivermectin or tetracycline, or are co infected with either W bancrofti or L loa provide both input to the pathway studies and a means of validation of the computer assimilations. Confirmation of the mechanisms and targets of protective immunity and validation of computer assimilations will also be investigated using the O ochengi-cattle model that also enables experimentation under natural challenge. Litomosoides sigmodontis in mice provides a robust and rapid validation of results obtained from computation relating to expression and regulation of protective responses and a primary system for screening vaccine candidates


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP-SICA | Phase: HEALTH.2011.2.4.3-4 | Award Amount: 3.85M | Year: 2012

Migration from Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) to Europe is increasing. The limited evidence suggests that the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and obesity among SSA migrants is higher than among their SSA peers living in Africa and European host populations. The reasons for these observations are only poorly understood, but may involve migration-related changes in lifestyle, genetic predisposition as well as peculiarities in perceptions and practises. Contrasting the increasing number of African migrants in Europe, the health status and needs of these populations remain largely unexamined, and have only insufficiently been integrated into national plans, policies and strategies. Implementation of tailored intervention programmes among migrants implicitly requires the identification and the disentanglement of environmental, lifestyle and genetic factors modifying T2D and obesity risk. The RODAM project addresses these fundamental health issues among a homogeneous, and one of the largest SSA migrant groups in Europe (i.e. Ghanaians). RODAM thus aims to contribute to the understanding of the complex interplay between environment, lifestyle, (epi)genetic as well as social factors in T2D and obesity among SSA immigrants, and to identify specific risk factors to guide intervention and prevention and to provide a basis for improving diagnosis and treatment. In a multi-centre study, 6,250 Ghanaians aged >25 years will be recruited in rural and urban Ghana, Germany, the Netherlands, and the UK. The differences in prevalence rates within Ghana on the one hand, and three European countries on the other, will allow us to unravel environmental, lifestyle and (epi)genetic as well as social factors in relation to T2D and obesity. The proposed study will generate relevant results that will ultimately guide intervention programmes and will provide a basis for improving diagnosis and treatment among SSA migrants in Europe as well as in their counterparts in Africa and beyond.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENV.2013.6.1-2 | Award Amount: 11.51M | Year: 2013

Massive economic and population growth and urbanisation are expected to lead to a tripling of anthropogenic emissions in southern West Africa (SWA) between 2000 and 2030, the impacts of which on human health, ecosystems, food security and the regional climate are largely unknown. An assessment of these impacts is complicated by (a) a superposition with effects of global climate change, (b) the strong dependence of SWA on the sensitive West African monsoon, (c) incomplete scientific understanding of interactions between emissions, clouds, radiation, precipitation and regional circulations and (d) by a lack of observations to advance our understanding and improve predictions. The DACCIWA project will conduct extensive fieldwork in SWA to collect high-quality observations, spanning the entire process chain from surface-based natural and anthropogenic emissions to impacts on health, ecosystems and climate. Combining the resulting benchmark dataset with a wide range of modelling activities will allow (a) to assess all relevant physical and chemical processes, (b) to improve the monitoring of climate and compositional parameters from space and (c) to develop the next generation of weather and climate models capable of representing coupled cloud-aerosol interactions, which will ultimately lead to reduced uncertainties in climate predictions. SWA with its rich mix of emissions and diverse clouds is ideal for such a study and many findings and technical developments will be applicable to other monsoon regions. Using a targeted dissemination strategy, DACCIWA will deliver a comprehensive scientific assessment and actively guide sustainable future planning and policy-making for West Africa and beyond. The interdisciplinary and experienced DACCIWA team will build on the scientific and logistical foundations established by AMMA (EU FP6) and collaborate closely with operational centres, international programs (e.g. WCRP, IGBP), policy-makers and users to maximise impact.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP-SICA | Phase: ENV.2010.3.1.1-3 | Award Amount: 2.00M | Year: 2011

The water and sanitation sector is not short of new and emerging technologies, but hardly any have been adopted into national strategies in Sub-Saharan Africa, nor have they been widely taken up by private enterprise. The contribution of new technologies to MDG targets appears therefore to have been minimal in the last 20 years. A key constraint to reaching the sector targets therefore appears to be the lack of systems to assess the potential of a technology and lack of ability to take new appropriate technologies to scale effectively. WASHTech seeks to address the problem through research on an innovatory process for assessing the potential and sustainability of a wide range of new technologies, and for designing successful strategies for scaling up. The overall development objective is for more effective investment in new technologies to achieve MDG targets. The project (WASHTECH) objective is to strengthen sector capacity to make effective investment in new technologies, through development of a framework which assesses the potential of new technologies introduced into innovative de-centralised systems. The project objective would be achieved through research producing two levels of outputs. The first level of outputs will consist of a widely applicable Technology Assessment Framework (TAF) and process that will provide a simple system and criteria for evaluating new technologies and their performance, identifying sustainability issues, and analysing approaches to introduction, innovation, diffusion and scaling up, including establishing of the required capacities in the three countries,: Burkina Faso, Ghana and Uganda. The second level of outputs depends on the TAF development and capacity building. They define strategies for innovation and scaling up, and the time-span and process needed to achieve successful up-take and sustainability.These outputs are both of direct use to the sector and are also an indication of the value and application of the framework

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