Şabāḩ as Sālim, Kuwait
Şabāḩ as Sālim, Kuwait

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Ali H.,Kuwait University | Ali H.,Dasman Diabetes Institute DDI | Bitar M.S.,Dasman Diabetes Institute DDI | Bitar M.S.,Kuwait University | And 4 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2017

Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) emerged as a powerful technology for studying copy number variations at higher resolution in many cancers including colorectal cancer. However, the lack of standardized systematic protocols including bioinformatic algorithms to obtain and analyze genomic data resulted in significant variation in the reported copy number aberration (CNA) data. Here, we present genomic aCGH data obtained using highly stringent and functionally relevant statistical algorithms from 116 well-defined microsatellites instable (MSI) and microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancers. We utilized aCGH to characterize genomic CNAs in 116 well-defined sets of colorectal cancer (CRC) cases. We further applied the significance testing for aberrant copy number (STAC) and Genomic Identification of Significant Targets in Cancer (GISTIC) algorithms to identify functionally relevant (nonrandom) chromosomal aberrations in the analyzed colorectal cancer samples. Our results produced high resolution genomic landscapes of both, MSI and MSS sporadic CRC. We found that CNAs in MSI and MSS CRCs are heterogeneous in nature but may be divided into 3 distinct genomic patterns. Moreover, we show that although CNAs in MSI and MSS CRCs differ with respect to their size, number and chromosomal distribution, the functional copy number aberrations obtained from MSI and MSS CRCs were in fact comparable but not identical. These unifying CNAs were verified by MLPA tumor-loss gene panel, which spans 15 different chromosomal locations and contains 50 probes for at least20 tumor suppressor genes. Consistently, deletion/amplification in these frequently cancer altered genes were identical in MSS and MSI CRCs. Our results suggest that MSI and MSS copy number aberrations driving CRC may be functionally comparable. © 2017 Ali et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.


Walne A.J.,Queen Mary, University of London | Collopy L.,Queen Mary, University of London | Cardoso S.,Queen Mary, University of London | Ellison A.,Queen Mary, University of London | And 15 more authors.
Haematologica | Year: 2016

Dyskeratosis congenita is a highly pleotropic genetic disorder. This heterogeneity can lead to difficulties in making an accurate diagnosis and delays in appropriate management. The aim of this study was to determine the underlying genetic basis in patients presenting with features of dyskeratosis congenita and who were negative for mutations in the classical dyskeratosis congenita genes. By whole exome and targeted sequencing, we identified biallelic variants in genes that are not associated with dyskeratosis congenita in 17 individuals from 12 families. Specifically, these were homozygous variants in USB1 (8 families), homozygous missense variants in GRHL2 (2 families) and identical compound heterozygous variants in LIG4 (2 families). All patients had multiple somatic features of dyskeratosis congenita but not the characteristic short telomeres. Our case series shows that biallelic variants in USB1, LIG4 and GRHL2, the genes mutated in poikiloderma with neutropenia, LIG4/Dubowitz syndrome and the recently recognized ectodermal dysplasia/short stature syndrome, respectively, cause features that overlap with dyskeratosis congenita. Strikingly, these genes also overlap in their biological function with the known dyskeratosis congenita genes that are implicated in telomere maintenance and DNA repair pathways. Collectively, these observations demonstrate the marked overlap of dyskeratosis congenita with four other genetic syndromes, confounding accurate diagnosis and subsequent management. This has important implications for establishing a genetic diagnosis when a new patient presents in the clinic. Patients with clinical features of dyskeratosis congenita need to have genetic analysis of USB1, LIG4 and GRHL2 in addition to the classical dyskeratosis congenita genes and telomere length measurements. © 2016 Ferrata Storti Foundation.


Ali R.H.,Kuwait University | Marafie M.J.,Kuwait Medical Genetics Center | Bitar M.S.,Kuwait University | Al-Dousari F.,Ministry of Interior | And 5 more authors.
International Journal of Molecular Sciences | Year: 2014

Gender-related differences in colorectal cancer (CRC) are not fully understood. Recent studies have shown that CRC arising in females are significantly associated with CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP-high). Using array comparative genomic hybridization, we analyzed a cohort of 116 CRCs (57 males, 59 females) for chromosomal copy number aberrations (CNA) and found that CRC in females had significantly higher numbers of gains involving chromosome arms 1q21.2–q21.3, 4q13.2, 6p21.1 and 16p11.2 and copy number losses of chromosome arm 11q25 compared to males. Interestingly, a subset of male CRCs (46%) exhibited a “feminization” phenomenon in the form of gains of X chromosomes (or an arm of X) and/or losses of the Y chromosome. Feminization of cancer cells was significantly associated with microsatellite-stable CRCs (p-value 0.003) and wild-type BRAF gene status (p-value 0.009). No significant association with other clinicopathological parameters was identified including disease-free survival. In summary, our data show that some CNAs in CRC may be gender specific and that male cancers characterized by feminization may constitute a specific subset of CRCs that warrants further investigation. © 2014 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.


Hanna R.M.,Howard Hughes Medical Institute | Marsh S.E.,Howard Hughes Medical Institute | Swistun D.,Howard Hughes Medical Institute | Al-Gazali L.,United Arab Emirates University | And 14 more authors.
Neurology | Year: 2011

Objective: We sought to create a classification system for pediatric corpus callosal abnormalities (CCA) based upon midline sagittal brain MRI. We used the term CCA for patients with structural variants of the corpus callosum, excluding patients with interhemispheric cyst variant or pure dysplasia without hypoplasia. Currently, no system exists for nonsyndromic forms of CCA, and attempts to create such a system have been hampered by highly variable morphology in patients with sporadic CCA. We reasoned that any useful strategy should classify affected family members within the same type, and that phenotypic variability should be minimized in patients with recessive disease. Methods: We focused recruitment toward multiplex consanguineous families, ascertained 30 patients from 19 consanguineous families, and analyzed clinical features together with brain imaging. Results: We identified 3 major CCA classes, including hypoplasia, hypoplasia with dysplasia, and complete agenesis. Affected individuals within a given multiplex family usually displayed the same variant of the class of abnormality and they always displayed the same class of abnormality within each family, or they displayed complete agenesis. The system was validated among a second cohort of 10 sporadic patients with CCA. Conclusions: The data suggest that complete agenesis may be a common end-phenotype, and implicate multiple overlapping pathways in the etiology of CCA. Copyright © 2011 by AAN Enterprises, Inc.


Alhasan A.A.,Northumbria University | Izuogu O.G.,Northumbria University | Al-Balool H.H.,Kuwait Medical Genetics Center | Steyn J.S.,Northumbria University | And 8 more authors.
Blood | Year: 2016

In platelets, splicing and translation occur in the absence of a nucleus. However, the integrity and stability of mRNAs derived from megakaryocyte progenitor cells remain poorly quantified on a transcriptome-wide level. As circular RNAs (circRNAs) are resistant to degradation by exonucleases, their abundance relative to linear RNAs can be used as a surrogate marker for mRNA stability in the absence of transcription. Here we show that circRNAs are enriched in human platelets 17- to 188-fold relative to nucleated tissues and 14- to 26-fold relative to samples digested with RNAseRto selectively remove linear RNA. We compare RNAseq read depths inside and outside circRNAs to provide in silico evidence of transcript circularity, show that exons within circRNAs are enriched on average 12.7 times in platelets relative to nucleated tissues and identify 3162 genes significantly enriched for circRNAs, including some where all RNAseq reads appear to be derived from circular molecules. We also confirm that this is a feature of other anucleate cells through transcriptome sequencing of mature erythrocytes, demonstrate that circRNAs are not enriched in cultured megakaryocytes, and demonstrate that linear RNAs decay more rapidly than circRNAs in platelet preparations. Collectively, these results suggest that circulating platelets have lost >90% of their progenitor mRNAs and that translation in platelets occurs against the backdrop of a highly degraded transcriptome. Finally, we find that transcripts previously classified as products of reverse transcriptase template switching are both enriched in platelets and resistant to decay, countering the recent suggestion that up to 50% of rearranged RNAs are artifacts. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.


PubMed | Kuwait University, Kuwait Medical Genetics Center and Ministry of Interior
Type: Journal Article | Journal: International journal of molecular sciences | Year: 2014

Gender-related differences in colorectal cancer (CRC) are not fully understood. Recent studies have shown that CRC arising in females are significantly associated with CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP-high). Using array comparative genomic hybridization, we analyzed a cohort of 116 CRCs (57 males, 59 females) for chromosomal copy number aberrations (CNA) and found that CRC in females had significantly higher numbers of gains involving chromosome arms 1q21.2-q21.3, 4q13.2, 6p21.1 and 16p11.2 and copy number losses of chromosome arm 11q25 compared to males. Interestingly, a subset of male CRCs (46%) exhibited a feminization phenomenon in the form of gains of X chromosomes (or an arm of X) and/or losses of the Y chromosome. Feminization of cancer cells was significantly associated with microsatellite-stable CRCs (p-value 0.003) and wild-type BRAF gene status (p-value 0.009). No significant association with other clinicopathological parameters was identified including disease-free survival. In summary, our data show that some CNAs in CRC may be gender specific and that male cancers characterized by feminization may constitute a specific subset of CRCs that warrants further investigation.

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