Laboratory of Food Chemistry and Biochemistry and Leuven Food Science and Nutrition Research Center oe KU Leuven Kasteelpark Arenberg 20 B 3001 Leuven Belgium

Belgium

Laboratory of Food Chemistry and Biochemistry and Leuven Food Science and Nutrition Research Center oe KU Leuven Kasteelpark Arenberg 20 B 3001 Leuven Belgium

Belgium
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Struyf N.,Laboratory of Food Chemistry and Biochemistry and Leuven Food Science and Nutrition Research Center oe KU Leuven Kasteelpark Arenberg 20 B 3001 Leuven Belgium | Van der Maelen E.,Laboratory of Food Chemistry and Biochemistry and Leuven Food Science and Nutrition Research Center oe KU Leuven Kasteelpark Arenberg 20 B 3001 Leuven Belgium | Hemdane S.,Laboratory of Food Chemistry and Biochemistry and Leuven Food Science and Nutrition Research Center oe KU Leuven Kasteelpark Arenberg 20 B 3001 Leuven Belgium | Verspreet J.,Laboratory of Food Chemistry and Biochemistry and Leuven Food Science and Nutrition Research Center oe KU Leuven Kasteelpark Arenberg 20 B 3001 Leuven Belgium | And 2 more authors.
Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety | Year: 2017

Yeast-mediated dough fermentation is an important phase in the bread making process. The fermentative performance of yeast cells during fermentation is of critical importance for final bread quality, since yeast cells produce CO2 and other metabolites that have an influence on dough rheology and bread texture, volume, and taste. Different factors affect the fermentative performance of yeast cells during dough fermentation, including dough ingredients, fermentation conditions, the type of yeast strain used and yeast pregrowth conditions. Bread dough is a complex matrix that contains several ingredients that can affect the fermentation rate of yeast cells. Although the individual effects of sugar availability and salt level on the leavening ability of yeast have been studied extensively, a comprehensive overview of the relationship between bread dough constituents, fermentation conditions and yeast functionality is still lacking. Moreover, the dough environment is highly variable as several types of dough like lean, sweet or frozen doughs are currently produced by commercial bread producers. For optimal fermentation rates in different types of dough, the use of appropriate yeast strains with specific phenotypic traits is required. Therefore, many researchers have focused on the improvement of yeast strains for optimal fermentation in different types of dough like lean, sweet or frozen dough. Against this background, this review summarizes the current knowledge on the interaction between bread dough and baker's yeast and how to improve this interaction, thereby providing a useful background for further research concerning the functionality of yeast in bread dough. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.


Wouters A.G.,Laboratory of Food Chemistry and Biochemistry and Leuven Food Science and Nutrition Research Center oe KU Leuven Kasteelpark Arenberg 20 B 3001 Leuven Belgium | Rombouts I.,Laboratory of Food Chemistry and Biochemistry and Leuven Food Science and Nutrition Research Center oe KU Leuven Kasteelpark Arenberg 20 B 3001 Leuven Belgium | Fierens E.,Laboratory of Food Chemistry and Biochemistry and Leuven Food Science and Nutrition Research Center oe KU Leuven Kasteelpark Arenberg 20 B 3001 Leuven Belgium | Brijs K.,Laboratory of Food Chemistry and Biochemistry and Leuven Food Science and Nutrition Research Center oe KU Leuven Kasteelpark Arenberg 20 B 3001 Leuven Belgium | Delcour J.A.,Laboratory of Food Chemistry and Biochemistry and Leuven Food Science and Nutrition Research Center oe KU Leuven Kasteelpark Arenberg 20 B 3001 Leuven Belgium
Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety | Year: 2016

Proteins play a crucial role in determining texture and structure of many food products. Although some animal proteins (such as egg white) have excellent functional and organoleptic properties, unfortunately, they entail a higher production cost and environmental impact than plant proteins. It is rather unfortunate that plant protein functionality is often insufficient because of low solubility in aqueous media. Enzymatic hydrolysis strongly increases solubility of proteins and alters their functional properties. The latter is attributed to 3 major structural changes: a decrease in average molecular mass, a higher availability of hydrophobic regions, and the liberation of ionizable groups. We here review current knowledge on solubility, water- and fat-holding capacity, gelation, foaming, and emulsifying properties of plant protein hydrolysates and discuss how these properties are affected by controlled enzymatic hydrolysis. In many cases, research in this field has been limited to fairly simple set-ups where functionality has been assessed in model systems. To evolve toward a more widely applied industrial use of plant protein hydrolysates, a more thorough understanding of functional properties is required. The structure-function relationship of protein hydrolysates needs to be studied in depth. Finally, test model systems closer to real food processing conditions, and thus to real foods, would be helpful to evaluate whether plant protein hydrolysates could be a viable alternative for other functional protein sources. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®.

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